IdNumber of occurencesForms
7122 2  on the basis of plausible scenarios of climate change and use of space for the coming years to 
and assessment aphidiennes agricultural risk related  
7127 3          among the potential ecological impacts of global change, its consequences for the func 
ecological redundancy implies a greater risk of rupture of the interaction and consequently the 
, implying a diversity of mechanisms of impacts of changes. . using hypervariable molecular mar 
7142 1 nges. we propose to study the impact of climate change on vegetation dynamics in the french mou 
7170 1 standing of the history and dynamics of invasion green frogs belonging to the group ridibunda a 
7245 3 es the resolution of the crisis of mass extinction of species and populations is a major societ 
 and marl to establish a mapping of the risk of extinction reptile populations and propose sust 
l to establish a mapping of the risk of extinction reptile populations and propose sustainable  
7264 1 etically, especially during episodes of extinction or radiation  
7279 2 ive models for estimating anthropogenic impacts and climate change on the systems studied. dip  
or estimating anthropogenic impacts and climate change on the systems studied. dip integrate ne 
7285 1  of life history traits under different fire regimes  
7299 1 generated in the environment of harmful pollution, the main effect is, like many abiotic and bi 
7500 1                        some soils, said disease resistant, limit their particular microflora by 
7550 1                                         nitrification is a key function of the nitrogen cycle,  
7586 1 ical characteristics and assessments of disease resistance of the National cichorium collection 
7609 1 mechanism of bacterial evolution to the degradation of chemical pollutants. the"nano genomics"p 
7612 3 alance to monitor the behavior of these heavy metals. in france there are many sites and soils  
sediments have extremely high levels of heavy metals. dredging may thus have negative aspects,  
f toxic elements. the result is intense erosion of certain sites and the propagation of contami 
11864 3  terrestrial catchment. the problems of pollution in lakes are well known as nutrients from fer 
rial entering a lake can be affected by climate change and land management practices. the consu 
ies in the lake can also be affected by invasive species such as the zebra mussel which voracio 
10966 1  isotope records give much insight into climate change but interpretation still tends to rest o 
12585 1 enhancement of carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation and flood protection goals. t 
12716 1 ruses responsible for emerging wildlife disease in amphibians  
10029 2          with rising concerns about the impacts of global climate change, it is important that  
ng concerns about the impacts of global climate change, it is important that we monitor the hea 
11058 2          with rising concerns about the impacts of global climate change, it is important that  
ng concerns about the impacts of global climate change, it is important that we monitor the hea 
12596 4 extraction, release large quantities of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, thereby  
carbon dioxide, thereby contributing to global warming. restoration of these damaged peatlands  
that is, so that they act as a brake on global warming. however, restoration schemes have not c 
and restoration from the perspective of climate change. given the uncertain role of methane in  
13819 1 duction gains while minimising negative impacts upon ecm fungal diversity through altering fert 
15372 1 to accurately forecast the responses to climate change. in this project, we aim to investigate  
13457 2 on fluxes from soils under land use and climate change. despite the known importance of soil mi 
iently enrich for genes involved in the degradation of complex carbon sources, that is up to 20 
15064 2 rmits rapid publication of results. the risk in evaluating a biological model in such a way is  
ability, as well as their likelihood of extinction. in previous work, we showed how the surviva 
10277 1 ich species survived and which suffered extinction. the results of our study will help elucidat 
10288 1 ich species survived and which suffered extinction. the results of our study will help elucidat 
10531 1 ich species survived and which suffered extinction. the results of our study will help elucidat 
13779 1 edicted to experience relatively strong climate change effects with likely negative consequence 
10340 1 species and contexts including pest and disease vector control.  
10994 1 species and contexts including pest and disease vector control.  
9967 1 species and contexts including pest and disease vector control.  
12267 2 on is key to drawing conclusions on the impacts of peat use on climate change. many lca studies 
nclusions on the impacts of peat use on climate change. many lca studies discount biogenic carb 
12455 3  , etc. key customer purpose: develop a risk analysis framework for the identification, assessm 
ssment, management and communication of risk. the framework will increase our capacity to both  
erstand and incorporate uncertainty and risk when making fisheries management decisions.  
14751 2 h prevent both auto-regeneration of the endangered species in their natural habitats and their  
l inoculation for the reintroduction of endangered species and for the ecological restoration o 
12759 1 ll provide information on the potential impacts of geo-engineering activities on biodiversity a 
10812 2 ensitive to humans more likely to be at risk of global extinction relatively little is known ab 
ans more likely to be at risk of global extinction relatively little is known about whether pro 
9961 2 ensitive to humans more likely to be at risk of global extinction relatively little is known ab 
ans more likely to be at risk of global extinction relatively little is known about whether pro 
7685 1 m changes, their interactions and their impacts is critical to any projection of how marine soc 
12027 1 land-use change has contrasting spatial impacts. while all out urbanisation and development of  
10264 1                                         global warming is not the only consequence of rising le 
10075 1 s accelerating tree growth and what the impacts have been on biodiversity behind this change. 1 
11513 1 s accelerating tree growth and what the impacts have been on biodiversity behind this change. 1 
7189 1 nsfers in landscape mosaics; assess the environmental impacts of production methods and landsca 
15165 3 t indirect and direct keys of predation risk around seed-bearing trees will modify seed removal 
hanges in seed shadows due to predation risk will influence the final pattern of holm oak recru 
erimental control of keys of predations risk in field conditions, then measuring the behaviour  
1992 1 ld-wide is alarming with respect to its environmental impact and conservation. at the same time 
539 1  more and more obvious that the current global warming influences ecosystems, and particularly  
11554 1 ct how species introductions and global climate change are likely to affect success of individu 
10709 4 gricultural landscapes. because of this habitat loss, some species are failing to shift and are 
ies that are lagging behind climate are endangered species of high conservation concern. even i 
open up a new avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation 
ew avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation strategies 
14956 1 nce it produces more tolerant plants to drought.  
15053 1 tant acid ph and high concentrations of heavy metals. these unusual conditions are the reason w 
12148 3  project is to study the adaptations of invasive species and their impacts on the ecosystems of 
aptations of invasive species and their impacts on the ecosystems of different complexity and r 
stem level, which could help to predict invasion outcome. our tasks include answering of the fo 
14629 1 s in inland waters system are a serious risk for planktonic photosynthetic microorganisms popul 
11353 4 trial parts of britain; while in rural, pollution free, areas typica remained common. the widel 
n areas with high levels of atmospheric pollution carbonaria is relatively harder to find than  
nciding with the implementation of anti-pollution legislation, lends further support to the cry 
hich the evolutionary response to smoke pollution could not have occurred. do they represent an 
13789 1 ll either force them to local or global extinction, or to evolve and adapt. the capacity of org 
12067 8 cological consequences of anthropogenic degradation is of fundamental importance, particularly  
rvices by accelerating rates of species extinction, especially those that tied the long-term fu 
tems makes them less prone to cope with invasive species . some of which are clearly detrimenta 
ants to crops constitutes an economical risk that will be taken into consideration. in addition 
ddition, the emergence of some tropical disease can be directly linked to the rapid and general 
tly linked to the rapid and generalized degradation of the environment. the modification of the 
ct vectors constitutes an epidemiologic risk of the emergence of endemic disease via a domicili 
ologic risk of the emergence of endemic disease via a domiciliation process, sylvatic vectors i 
2031 1 th increased temperatures due to global climate change. plants, insects and vertebrates respond 
2491 2 na which are due to extreme weather and climate change, and are the rules adequate to effective 
interdisciplinary project responding to climate change: the potential of and limits to adaptati 
12399 3 into the socio-economic consequences of climate change in the marine environment. it will inves 
es and legislation are robust to future climate change, and it will explore decadal-scale varia 
ill explore decadal-scale variations in climate change that might mask the overall warming tren 
15364 3 s in length, frequency and intensity of drought events related to climate change have been asso 
 intensity of drought events related to climate change have been associated to important change 
 forest under different managements and climate change scenarios in order to develop a manageme 
15514 1 neous environments, are particularly at risk because of the predicted increase in aridity and r 
15515 1 neous environments, are particularly at risk because of the predicted increase in aridity and r 
13979 2 ns objectives. we will also examine the vulnerability of these recommendations to uncertainty a 
 case-study for application to regional endangered species management, with potentially great s 
7451 2 nt species are as yet unknown, however, climate change is likely to be an important factor. in  
the salmons range, wild salmon now face extinction. this is in spite of unprecedented managemen 
7051 1 of interactions between pests and their natural enemies, food web analysis provides a versatile 
10639 3 ectiveness of a land-use advocated as a climate change mitigation strategy. the project will sh 
e society to respond urgently to global climate change by providing timely evidence-based recom 
endations to policy makers charged with climate change adaptation and mitigation. moreover this 
7190 1 ic viability of farms. in this context, weeds diverse biological characteristics of weed specie 
7417 1  the syrphid communities, diptera aphid natural enemies of aphids and pollinators, linked to th 
7413 1 of various grain farms to compare their impacts in different contexts agronomic. the presence o 
7703 2 magnaporthe grisea agent most important disease rice blast. acquire new knowledge of the intera 
on and or mineral. yield components and disease will be studied in these systems. the dynamics  
13310 6 o minimise negative direct and indirect human impacts. research will focus on assessment and fo 
sity. in particular, risks arising from climate change, environmental chemicals, biological inv 
limate change, environmental chemicals, biological invasions and pollinator loss in the context 
ental risks subsequent to each of these impacts. this yields an improved understanding on how t 
d to deal with such aspects of combined impacts and their consequences. risk assessments in ala 
ombined impacts and their consequences. risk assessments in alarm will be hierarchical and exam 
13593 3                                         biological invasions are a major component of the ongoi 
he importance of these interactions for invasion success and on the effects of invading species 
the development of tools for predicting invasion success and ecosystem effects of invasions, ap 
11101 1 international agreement to minimise the impacts of alien of otoliths of pikeperch we aim to obt 
2522 2                        introductions of alien species been recognized globally as a major threa 
op monitoring and action plans for this invasive species.  
12016 5 ng acknowledgement of the importance of biological invasion in current biodiversity loss, inter 
tance of biological invasion in current biodiversity loss, international research has recently  
xt. we have studied the impact of alien invasive species in invaded communities, taking the rat 
 understanding of the complexity of the impacts of invasive species when introduced to or remov 
ing of the complexity of the impacts of invasive species when introduced to or removed from isl 
13743 4                                         biological invasions are among the greatest threats to  
pecies when it grows in the vicinity of alien species. the species used in the experiment will  
nation network. to study the ability of invasive species to establish facilitative interactions 
 of importance for our understanding of biological invasions. furthermore, to be able to predic 
11067 4  main determinant of species ranges, so climate change is expected to cause changes in species  
mask latitudinal shifts by delaying the extinction of species at a regional scale. although spe 
s are likely to respond individually to climate change, the overall consequences of these chang 
derstanding of the potential effects of climate change on regional and global biodiversity. thi 
9965 4  main determinant of species ranges, so climate change is expected to cause changes in species  
mask latitudinal shifts by delaying the extinction of species at a regional scale. although spe 
s are likely to respond individually to climate change, the overall consequences of these chang 
derstanding of the potential effects of climate change on regional and global biodiversity. thi 
10527 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
10774 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11051 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11574 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11816 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11817 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11820 1 of the response of the amazon to future climate change.  
11235 1  deforestation, resource extraction and climate change. this proposal is for a 6-month grant to 
10573 5  play a critical role in the cycling of greenhouse gases between the biosphere and atmosphere.  
of future environmental change or human disturbance, and will be useful for future modelling ef 
opical peatlands for current and future climate change. the need for studies like this are part 
s, greenhouse gas emissions and habitat degradation, all of which may act as a positive feedbac 
which may act as a positive feedback to climate change.  
2204 1 e these two wps data to start modelling risk and economy already at an early stage of the progr 
11186 3 hey appear to act as a bell-weather for global warming. in 1998, an estimated 16% of the world  
ure, salinity, ocean circulation, river runoff and sediment discharge over a colony s lifetime. 
l to understanding the impact of future climate change and preparing management strategies for  
11576 1  focus for research into the effects of climate change on weather, climate, water resources, ag 
10650 2 heir botanical composition under future global warming scenarios is uncertain, but research int 
o store carbon during former periods of climate change can provide clues to their potential fut 
14848 1 tity of biological groups vulnerable to extinction. in front of the biological, ecological and  
12703 4 nd land management decisions concerning climate change and protected sites, and considerations  
r evidence of signals of the effects of climate change. there is also a project that is assessi 
is also a project that is assessing the impacts of climate change on ornithological interest of 
roject that is assessing the impacts of climate change on ornithological interest of uk special 
1085 7 ological mechanisms which influence the invasion of mediterranean sand dune ecosystems by alien 
ate the degree of naturalisation of the exotic species and their position concerning naturaliza 
heir position concerning naturalization-invasion processes. this project aims at setting up a g 
 to analyse the diversity of native and alien species in the different plant community types gr 
wing on coastal dunes. furthermore, the invasion processes of the sand dune systems will be mon 
dels which can predict the diffusion of alien species and to analyse invasion processes current 
ffusion of alien species and to analyse invasion processes currently in progress in sand dune e 
10232 1 bution changes under alternative future climate change scenarios.  
10498 1 bution changes under alternative future climate change scenarios.  
11512 1 bution changes under alternative future climate change scenarios.  
11613 1 bution changes under alternative future climate change scenarios.  
15038 12                                         biological invasions are important elements of global c 
resent an important component of marine exotic species, ranging between 10 and 40% of the total 
tween 10 and 40% of the total number of introduced species. naturalization and, fast and wide e 
on of some of these species mean a high risk for marine ecosystems, as seaweeds may function as 
the ecosystems, further than the direct impacts by the invasive species, such as changes in spe 
 further than the direct impacts by the invasive species, such as changes in species compositio 
oubt the most effective defence against biological invasions is prevention, for which, recently 
early detection systems to estimate the risk of invasions in the present climatic scenario and  
enario and in new climatic scenarios of global warming, identifying special sensitive regions t 
dentifying special sensitive regions to invasive species and, with them specific communities. u 
will be faced, considering as model the invasion of the red seaweed asparagopsis taxiformis on  
cies is considered one of the 100 worst invasive species in europe and in the mediterranean sea 
15143 1       nowadays, habitat destruction and fragmentation are major threats to the biodiversity con 
13415 1 on programme aims to prevent process of extinction, to provide descriptive information about th 
13600 2                           the effect of disturbance on ecosystems is one of the key questions i 
in forest ecocsystem response to canopy disturbance. the field site is subjected to four differ 
7630 2 on compensation "in kind" to offset the environmental impacts to the natural environment is sta 
ifferent configurations can have strong impacts on the functioning and effectiveness of the dev 
15333 2                            the loss and fragmentation of habitat caused by agriculture, forestr 
the same time, will be investigated the impacts of the argentine ant on other arthropods and th 
15575 7 l landscapes, including destruction and fragmentation of natural habitats, reduction in habitat 
tat diversity, and increases in habitat disturbance and agrochemical application. agricultural  
 is considered a major driver of global biodiversity loss, and has important effects on many ec 
ication. the diversity and abundance of natural enemies and natural enemy attack rates have oft 
 where the trophic interactions between natural enemies, pests and alternative prey are determi 
ultural pests, predatory and parasitoid natural enemies and their alternative prey/hosts as it  
urope, and the most important groups of natural enemies of these aphids as well as their non-pe 
7034 1 ding to a change in driving forces like climate change.  
14663 2 iods with high irradiance combined with drought or low temperatures. the imbalance between ligh 
m-oak regeneration by resprouting after fire.  
11022 1          although the era following the extinction of the dinosaurs is often referred to as the 
12490 9 iliser use. ammonia can have a range of impacts on the environment and human health, including  
 nitrate and its subsequent leaching; - pollution of ground water and drinking water due to nit 
inking water due to nitrate leaching; - eutrophication of surface waters due to nitrogen enrich 
ce waters due to nitrogen enrichment; - global warming due to emission of nitrous oxide and met 
pproach which considers these ecosystem impacts in isolation is not viable. the additional comp 
er from terrestrial systems - so called pollution swapping. for example, techniques to reduce a 
rous oxide emissions that contribute to climate change. in the uk to date, most effort has been 
rvices more comprehensively in terms of impacts, value of ecosytem services and links to human  
nvolve different types of potential for pollution swapping. the project will also identify pote 
12516 3  assess alternative methods of pest and disease management in organic and low input apple orcha 
ntial for successful management of this disease. finally a review of the effects of calcium on  
st to improve fruit quality, reduce the risk of physiological disorders and prolong storage lif 
11863 1 , or were present in stores that caught fire. charred grains of wheat and barley are often foun 
7035 2 d photooxidation by uv-radiation on the degradation of putatively recalcitrant compounds. new u 
s predicted to be particularly prone to global warming. this ecosystem-level information, coupl 
11663 4  ascertaining if an emergent infectious disease is spreading and if that spread is mediated by  
s a fundamental component of infectious disease risk assessment, indentified as a deliverable i 
amental component of infectious disease risk assessment, indentified as a deliverable in nerc s 
rary record of the spread of a wildlife disease through british common frog populations. the fr 
11636 2 ed and not expressed in the presence of nitrification inhibitors. the project therefore will th 
 important soil ecosystem process, soil nitrification.  
10070 3 tened worldwide by ectomycorrhizal tree invasion. the trees shade out native heath shrubs and e 
 century, largely due to birch and pine invasion, both of which are obligately ectomycorrhizal  
imed at addressing ectomycorrhizal tree invasion of heathlands.  
10429 1 cal ecosystems are major sources of the greenhouse gases . the proposed research will greatly a 
10967 1 cal ecosystems are major sources of the greenhouse gases . the proposed research will greatly a 
11699 1 cal ecosystems are major sources of the greenhouse gases . the proposed research will greatly a 
14952 1                                         biological invasions have become so widespread to const 
14540 2 ginal from america, which behaves as an invasive species, outcompeting the autochthonous artemi 
 as possible the presence of the exotic invasive species. the research on life span for specime 
7151 1  a business perspective. the reality of climate change, notably that of the increase in the ave 
13875 4 rosa rugosa from ne asia is an invasive exotic species in n europe and ne north america. it con 
ly, r. rugosa may have escaped from its natural enemies , which limit population growth and pla 
ar species, and the introduction of new invasive species. the project will test for quantittive 
hesis by reducing general herbivory and disease under field conditions with competitive neighbo 
12590 1 clear. therefore, it is likely that the impacts of any specific mitigation measures cannot curr 
12342 1 discard mortality will be to reduce the risk that unsustainable fishing practices or quotas wil 
12291 13  sustainable management of agricultural weeds by i proposed changes to eu pesticide legislation 
creased invasions of novel agricultural weeds as a result of climate and other environmental ch 
ng incidence of herbicide resistance in weeds. herbicide resistance evolves in weed species fol 
order to deliver sustainable control of weeds. a key objective of this research is to develop a 
 a computer model that will predict the impacts of changes in herbicide availability on the con 
erbicide availability on the control of weeds in uk arable cropping rotations. as it will not b 
it will not be possible to consider all weeds, we have chosen to focus on blackgrass, the most  
 model has been used to demonstrate the impacts of changing pesticide legislation, a series of  
will help to direct future defra-funded weeds research. in particular, the development of alter 
rch to better understand the biology of weeds, so that this knowledge can be used to inform the 
ect will consider the potential for new weeds to invade and spread in the uk. there is increasi 
 there is increasing evidence that some weeds that are serious agricultural problems in their n 
o quantify and mitigate future risks of invasion.  
10840 1                                         eutrophication is at present affecting global freshwate 
7485 2  produce robust equipment and implement risk adverse operations. the prevent escape project wil 
more successful, genetic and ecological impacts should diminish.  
14109 4 st century have resulted in significant fragmentation of plant populations causing the loss of  
se species fitness and increase species vulnerability to environmental changes. in contemporary 
d to counteract the negative effects of fragmentation. the role of such elements enabling gene  
ave been shown to be most vulnerable to fragmentation, and ditch verges in agricultural landsca 
12550 6 overy. alternatively in cases of higher disease levels, the only course of action is to destroy 
 use of antibiotics to achieve improved disease control of efb. shook swarm involves transferri 
usative organism of european foul brood disease, within colonies prior to and post the shook sw 
ken from apparently healthy colonies in disease free counties of england and wales to attempt t 
pt to map geographical incidence of the disease causing organisms and threshold levels of bacte 
ead to development of clinical signs of disease. all samples of adult bees and brood will be ta 
10865 1 hat is world-leading in ecosystem based ocean acidification research using natural analogues. t 
14816 1 ive models of future distributions in a climate change scenario. we will also extract the perti 
10311 7 nusually dry conditions, a second major drought in 5 years, a pattern which is remarkably simil 
ming century as a consequence of global climate change. whether or not long-term climate change 
limate change. whether or not long-term climate change is already involved the current event ca 
o helping assess the potential scale of impacts as the amazon climate dries. our team has a lar 
llent opportunity to measure the actual impacts of drought. we already did this with the severe 
tunity to measure the actual impacts of drought. we already did this with the severe 2005 droug 
e already did this with the severe 2005 drought the infrastructure installed to allow local col 
9953 6  last few months there has been extreme drought in amazonia. this may be related to warming of  
yclones since records began. the amazon drought may have been a similarly unusual event. in wes 
rly this may have been the most intense drought since weather records began in this region in t 
in for an additional year following the drought so that we can understand in more detail how am 
ail how amazon forests recover from the drought. together with this intensive fieldwork and sub 
ude, intensity, and distribution of the drought, and also satellite-based measurements of fores 
9985 6  last few months there has been extreme drought in amazonia. this may be related to warming of  
yclones since records began. the amazon drought may have been a similarly unusual event. in wes 
rly this may have been the most intense drought since weather records began in this region in t 
in for an additional year following the drought so that we can understand in more detail how am 
ail how amazon forests recover from the drought. together with this intensive fieldwork and sub 
ude, intensity, and distribution of the drought, and also satellite-based measurements of fores 
10067 5                    proliferative kidney disease and will significantly contribute to fundamenta 
nderstanding is crucial for identifying risk factors associated with disease outbreaks and the  
dentifying risk factors associated with disease outbreaks and the susceptibility of wild fish p 
tional monitoring and minimising future disease impacts.  
onitoring and minimising future disease impacts.  
10156 7 been a surge of interest in the role of disease on individual health and its effects on host po 
se studies and, indeed, the majority of disease control programmes of humans and domestic anima 
sign of truly effective and sustainable disease control programs. if control approaches only co 
e may be unpredictable consequences for disease caused by other, co-infecting parasites. howeve 
e a vital tool for developing long-term disease control strategies in other host species, such  
estic animals or wildlife threatened to extinction by infectious diseases. it is gradually bein 
nding of the factors affecting parasite invasion, transmission, persistence, and control. this  
11676 7 been a surge of interest in the role of disease on individual health and its effects on host po 
se studies and, indeed, the majority of disease control programmes of humans and domestic anima 
sign of truly effective and sustainable disease control programs. if control approaches only co 
e may be unpredictable consequences for disease caused by other, co-infecting parasites. howeve 
e a vital tool for developing long-term disease control strategies in other host species, such  
estic animals or wildlife threatened to extinction by infectious diseases. it is gradually bein 
nding of the factors affecting parasite invasion, transmission, persistence, and control. this  
12341 2 is necessary to collect evidence on the risk of capture and the survivorship of caught & discar 
develop a qualitative assessment of the vulnerability of stocks to fisheries , and forecasting  
12615 3  soil, mainly resulting from industrial pollution. government has a wide range of policies spec 
event new contamination is centred on a risk based framework, recognising that whilst contamina 
 due to the different circumstances and risk scenarios at each site. it is therefore the case t 
10992 1 rsity and the impact of factors such as climate change, this project aims to provide a small-sc 
419 2 ears to be one of the most sensitive to climate change. the potential impacts of these changes  
sitive to climate change. the potential impacts of these changes could have tragic consequences 
7136 2 be one of the most sensitive regions to climate change. the potential impacts of this change co 
egions to climate change. the potential impacts of this change could have dramatic consequences 
12272 12 s that influence the sustainability and environmental impacts of arable crop production. this p 
 ripening to measure stem, root and pod disease levels. as for the wheat survey, a questionnair 
cted by fusarium head blight which is a disease caused by a complex of at least five pathogen s 
 monitoring the annual severity of this disease, measure changes in prevalence of each species  
 practice and provide data to assist in risk analyses for mycotoxin contamination in grain. the 
olicy making which aims to mitigate the impacts of crop diseases and pests and unsustainable ma 
 are also a key resource for monitoring impacts of climate change on uk agriculture by measurin 
 key resource for monitoring impacts of climate change on uk agriculture by measuring indicator 
tly these data were used to examine the impacts of revisions to directive 91/414/eec, affecting 
vision of data for investigation of the impacts of issues including food security, climate chan 
acts of issues including food security, climate change, environmental protection, uk and eu gov 
evelopment and validation of models for disease and pest forecasting and identification of sust 
7457 3       as the evidence for human induced climate change becomes clearer, so too does the realiza 
 realization that its effects will have impacts on natural environment and socio-economic syste 
s of life. the proposal will assess the impacts of a changing climate on the quantity and quali 
12252 1 itself causing point source and diffuse pollution and impacting on habitats and biodiversity. t 
12153 1 rmance, animal welfare, farm economics, environmental impact and landscape. the potential impac 
7667 1 earch teams have been interested in the impacts of human activities on function of the ecosyste 
7619 3 s using the plant for the management of soil erosion. the french association of biological engi 
gical engineering for the management of soil erosion. french position this association with a e 
 plant technology for the management of soil erosion  
7426 1      for septoria, predominantly foliar disease of wheat, varietal resistances available are pa 
14699 1 to higher relevance alterations such as global warming. nevertheless, no systematic compilation 
11040 1 urements that tell us about the rate of climate change and its effects. our work will increase  
10002 4 hat alter surface ocean conditions like climate change, fishery activity, or ocean iron fertili 
t into how spatially pervasive temporal climate change impacts might be, a significant input fo 
ially pervasive temporal climate change impacts might be, a significant input for ecosystem and 
et modelling. our effort will also have impacts on future national survey capability and the ab 
15370 1 l as through the reduction of predation risk of nest contents. however, avian nests in general, 
10285 1 rize winning intergovernmental panel on climate change. it will be accompanied by a 2-way inter 
14511 1 populations as well as the influence of heavy metals on the eel susceptibility to infections, a 
15153 1 on networks highly resistant to species extinction. the main objective of this project is to te 
400 1 ate changes, aquaculture activities and habitat loss. fisheriesinduced selection is a serious t 
10281 6  the coastal zone are increasing due to global warming, with sea-level expected to rise by 0.5  
orminess is expected to enhance coastal erosion. in england alone, the management of flood and  
ne, the management of flood and coastal erosion risk costs £600 million per year, a figure that 
management of flood and coastal erosion risk costs £600 million per year, a figure that is expe 
 as the best form of protection against erosion as they form a natural buffer against incoming  
re made in our ability to predict beach erosion and accretion. the results will be published in 
13482 2 e consequences for growth and predation risk and that it can be altered instantaneously and con 
 resources wisely while confronted with climate change and increased maritime activities.  
15487 2 cation of behaviour to reduce predation risk to quantify the effects of predation and brood par 
fects of predation and brood parasitism risk on reproductive success and survival as fitness es 
14717 3 esses are also affected by differential extinction rates and behavioural flexibility has been h 
ty has been hypothetised to reduce this risk, we will also test whether or not flexible clades  
r not flexible clades are less prone to extinction when facing environmental changes. second, b 
14974 2 in their environment, animals can avoid extinction through the development of behavioural adjus 
 threats such as habitat destruction or climate change. using this two-level approach, we hope  
12606 1 ial negative environmental and economic impacts of each practice identified will also be consid 
11595 1 e resistance to antibiotics; industrial pollution led to the evolution of dark forms of the pep 
14996 2 udies in which it is tried to carry out risk maps and epidemiological surveillance on the disea 
and epidemiological surveillance on the disease in the zones mentioned in this project.  
7249 3 ing environmental contamination and its impacts on the ecosystem. the biological indices curren 
 temporal variability of contamination, invasive species now widely present in temperate aquati 
rritory in terms of modification of the runoff, sources of micro and ecotoxicological impact on 
14200 2                                     the pollution of freshwater ecosystems by potentially hazar 
give the scientific basis for realistic risk assessment of hazards of chemicals for aquatic eco 
15347 1 heir walls and mortars, as well as rock erosion and crumbling. due to the fact that some tombs  
13335 1        the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystems are major scientific and soci 
2492 2 ased forecasts predicting high rates of extinction over the coming 100 years. however, such pre 
empo and mode of population response to climate change, as well as to evaluate, adjust and impr 
2493 2 hat these changes have disproportionate impacts on demographic parameters of predators that exp 
e hypotheses tested that pertain to the impacts of climate and land-use changes on biodiversity 
7104 2 t the zonal measures for exclusion from human impacts are to be reconsidered in the banal space 
e believe, around the lethal effects of human impact on the natural environment versus environm 
11774 2 ill focus specifically on the potential impacts of climate change, which has been identified as 
pecifically on the potential impacts of climate change, which has been identified as a major st 
11514 3 ed research will examine the effects of biodiversity loss in the marine environment by using a  
 manipulative experiments will simulate biodiversity loss in two trophic levels, the dominant p 
o provide a predictive understanding of biodiversity loss in the marine environment.  
9925 3 ed research will examine the effects of biodiversity loss in the marine environment by using a  
 manipulative experiments will simulate biodiversity loss in two trophic levels, the dominant p 
o provide a predictive understanding of biodiversity loss in the marine environment.  
15337 1 ransmitted by arthorpods as vectors. in endangered species pv infection has ecological and cons 
13947 4                         destruction and fragmentation of natural habitats is predicted to cause 
to cause unprecedented rates of species extinction in the near future. here we will investigate 
e response of ecological communities to species loss is most likely affected both by local proc 
unity viability analysis that generates risk assessments: the probability that the number of sp 
521 1 the biodiversity in their plots and the impacts caused by their practices. the achievement of t 
14114 3 imals, the ostracods. amongst the major extinction events of the phanerozoic, the end ordovicia 
 of the phanerozoic, the end ordovician extinction is of crucial importance to the understandin 
ordovician period ends with a series of extinction events . past environmental, lifestyle and b 
7158 1 the variability of species richness and extinction rates and local turnover will be greater for 
14821 2 elopment has led to a series of adverse impacts and most are showing serious signs of degradati 
s and most are showing serious signs of degradation. the pego- oliva marjal, located in the are 
9933 2                                         eutrophication is perhaps the most important threat to  
ersity reduction caused by regional air pollution was actually occurring. stevens et al. provid 
2137 4                                     the impacts of pronounced climate change are now apparent a 
              the impacts of pronounced climate change are now apparent at various sites in the 
ll develop theoretical framework of the impacts of the global warming on the soft-bottom marine 
retical framework of the impacts of the global warming on the soft-bottom marine biodiversity i 
7030 1 tinct scientific field is threatened by extinction because the number of alpha-taxonomists dras 
14419 1 al environmental challenges cause rapid erosion of biological diversity in most parts of the wo 
7286 4 eractions, the negative consequences of fragmentation of plant populations that tends to increa 
 populations that tends to increase the risk of extinction. a floristically diverse surrounding 
ions that tends to increase the risk of extinction. a floristically diverse surrounding communi 
assemblage of insects would reduce this risk by being a source of pollinators for fragmented po 
7153 2 mechanisms in animals, in situations of human impacts quantitatively and qualitatively differen 
t in an attempt to model the effects of human impact on animal biodiversity in a time scale ran 
14716 1 t the same time avoiding the ecological risk of introducing epn strains from other countries. t 
13485 1 stions regarding which lakes are in the risk of becoming eutrophicated, which p compounds are i 
11672 1 n gases, some of which are important in global warming. while a lot of work has been done to me 
11794 1 n gases, some of which are important in global warming. while a lot of work has been done to me 
14937 1 orted worldwide due to global trade and climate change. this project will study the biogeograph 
11728 1 rial populations, and for environmental/climate change. this research will develop analytical p 
14115 3 multiple response of natural systems to human impact and economic importance of monitoring acti 
w a direct threat to wildlife, but this extinction is also an indirect threat to future human w 
for evaluation of air and precipitation pollution distribution . 2.develop and implement biolog 
15264 1 ate seriously a previous situation of a disease in the stranded animals, at the time that can d 
12036 5 processes at play during invasions most biological invasions are a threat to biodiversity, huma 
imental limitations. the description of biological invasions is difficult because its early sta 
 stages designed to infer the routes of invasion have been developed and made available to the  
ave highlighted an original scenario of invasion which applies to three invasive species consid 
ario of invasion which applies to three invasive species considered: the invasive bridgehead sc 
14743 3                                         invasive species can pose a major threat to the biotic  
establishment and eventual expansion of invasive species in aquatic systems are not well unders 
the integration of these factors into a risk assessment protocol for use across spain.  
15120 2  the environmental constraints, such as drought in temporary ponds or confinement in coastal la 
 ecosystems: temporary ponds, where the drought is a determining factor; and confined coastal l 
12681 3  process for collating and reporting on climate change induced trends in the abundance and dist 
species and habitats most vulnerable to climate change. it will identify, develop and update in 
ntify, develop and update indicators of climate change induced trends which will be available o 
14703 1 ariations can be accentuated because of climate change effects. discharge changes drive biogeoc 
14421 6                                         invasive alien species . bulgaria is among the countrie 
ribution, biology, ecology and paths of invasion of the invasive alien species in the bulgarian 
y, ecology and paths of invasion of the invasive alien species in the bulgarian flora and contr 
 introduction and spread of the studied invasive species and their impact on the local biodiver 
 a book on the invasive and potentially invasive species in the bulgarian flora. 9. a web-site  
b-site for the invasive and potentially invasive species in the bulgarian flora. project result 
14575 1                                         biological invasions have become so widespread to const 
14494 1 l to forget that it seems to approach a climate change that could involve an increase of the su 
14788 4 t accumulators of metals and respond to pollution in a sensitive and measurable manner being wi 
dely used as sentinels of environmental pollution in soils. several authors suggested that slug 
s and other molluscs are used in marine pollution monitoring programs to design a worldwide slu 
ased on the biomarker approach for soil pollution monitoring.  
11601 1 owledge on how global change, including climate change and human modifications of the earth s s 
10797 2 ey factors in its occurrence today. the disease can be caused by any one of five related bacter 
can also be infected, especially if the disease is caught by eating or drinking infected foods. 
11565 2 ey factors in its occurrence today. the disease can be caused by any one of five related bacter 
can also be infected, especially if the disease is caught by eating or drinking infected foods. 
15087 4                          a quantitative risk assessment based only on exposure and toxicity is  
ld be useful in exposure assessment and risk prediction in populations of raptors. in the secon 
ch inhabit areas of known environmental pollution could allow us to identify exposure ranges an 
pulation management, protected areas or endangered species must be taken. in the third place, t 
7613 3 ctivities are generating strong organic pollution to environmental impacts. a significant fract 
 generating strong organic pollution to environmental impacts. a significant fraction of these  
or decision support in the treatment of pollution. these indicators may be biosensors consist o 
13313 4  with tools that are able to assess the impacts from community policies on biodiversity in a co 
this tool will be applied for assessing impacts and effectiveness of community policies based o 
 data as well as for forecasting future impacts based on existing scenario studies. the bioscor 
e tool for the purpose of assessing the impacts of key drivers and pressures on biodiversity; - 
10459 1 anging forms. the benthic foraminiferal extinction at the paleocene/eocene boundary appears the 
1083 2 ally expressed by changes in speciation/extinction rates, turnovers and stability, require inve 
ory punctuated by accelerated radiation/extinction rates, turnovers, relatively long intervals  
10977 4                                         climate change over the last million years has seen rap 
e possible ramifications of the current global warming trend. the impact of such changes was fe 
tion of dwarf mammals in the context of climate change, because there are few reliable dates to 
 become extinct, perhaps due to further climate change did the same thing happen repeatedly in  
11166 4                                         climate change over the last million years has seen rap 
e possible ramifications of the current global warming trend. the impact of such changes was fe 
tion of dwarf mammals in the context of climate change, because there are few reliable dates to 
 become extinct, perhaps due to further climate change did the same thing happen repeatedly in  
9890 4                                         climate change over the last million years has seen rap 
e possible ramifications of the current global warming trend. the impact of such changes was fe 
tion of dwarf mammals in the context of climate change, because there are few reliable dates to 
 become extinct, perhaps due to further climate change did the same thing happen repeatedly in  
12017 1 ration horizons, which may provoke mass extinction of pelagic calcifiers within decades. coccol 
10571 2 ain a unique perspective on current-day climate change and the issues affecting life on earth.  
 this project aims to identify two mass extinction events in the boreal realm, and to ascertain 
6919 1 um head blight mean serious food safety risk. therefore the breeding of more resistant cultivar 
6829 2                             breeding of drought resistant vine varieties more important tasks:  
ortant tasks: 1. finding of sources for drought resistance 2. breeding of hybrid material and i 
6728 2 ave not yet such complex resistance. in drought the water use efficiency of green peas is more  
ance to fusarium and high crop quality. drought tolerance of these breeding lines have also bee 
6927 2 ions, lodging-resistance, above-average drought resistance, early ripening, excellent yield pot 
nd spatial diversification of leaf spot disease dominancy will be evaluated. the major properti 
13572 2 vironmental problem, probably caused by climate change. we will analyze the magnitude, time cou 
l be modeled under various scenarios of runoff, doc-losses from soils and in-lake doc processin 
14117 5 mental sciences. the loss of taxons and fragmentation of distribution areas is a challenge to a 
 part of bryoflora consists of rare and endangered species. their reaction to climate change an 
d endangered species. their reaction to climate change and management may be much different fro 
s flagship species to certain groups of endangered species. if the reason for their vulnerabili 
ngered species. if the reason for their vulnerability is explained, conservation of many more s 
15430 6                                  global climate change is a fact acknowledged by the scientific 
ain systems are especially sensitive to climate change since climatic conditions drastically ch 
 can be very useful as bioindicators of climate change: because of their poikilohiydric conditi 
 substrate make them more vulnerable to climate change, in addition, they have rapid responses  
ing the responses of these organisms to climate change is of vital importance. nevertheless, th 
s. bearing in mind the threat of global climate change to the biodiversity of the planet, we pr 
11064 3  has been used to predict the effect of habitat loss through port development, and the most eff 
mitigating the negative effects of this habitat loss through habitat creation schemes. the mode 
by developers to compare the ecological impacts of alternative port construction sites, or by c 
15221 1 ticularly due to two of its components: climate change and shifts in the uses of the land, whic 
6916 1 will reveal the process of burial. wood degradation and diagenetic processes will be assessed.  
12419 1 ures facing the coast from development, climate change, and competition for space between marit 
14764 2 an shrublands and forests. - effects of climate change in plant ecophysiology and the structure 
n the plants. evaluation of atmospheric pollution effects through biological indicators. -isoto 
11116 3                                         climate change is a cause for concern in the 21st centu 
ships between lake sediment proxies and disease incidence, that may be related to climate, or v 
e and its links to climate, vegetation, disease and human society may therefore be extremely re 
11244 1 ore people today become concerned about global warming and the effect that humans are having on 
11321 1 ore people today become concerned about global warming and the effect that humans are having on 
7025 1 y natural disturbances or anthropogenic impacts, which involve altered water regimes or a chang 
11102 6  involves the study of colonisation and extinction of populations of a species over whole lands 
ovement of individuals, causes of local extinction, and the patterns of habitat patches in a la 
understanding and predicting particular human impacts on biodiversity, such as habitat loss and 
 human impacts on biodiversity, such as habitat loss and fragmentation, the ability of species  
 biodiversity, such as habitat loss and fragmentation, the ability of species to respond to cli 
n, the ability of species to respond to climate change and the spread of non-native species. ho 
13777 7                                     the impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are 
                         the impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are already ev 
icant irrespective of which of the ipcc climate change scenarios that comes true. thus, strateg 
 resilience of ecosystems threatened by climate change. this project tests whether ecological r 
ive way to increase their resilience to climate change effects. as more of precipitation falls  
es from the upper and lower ends are at risk of extinction. by relating the presence of riparia 
the upper and lower ends are at risk of extinction. by relating the presence of riparian plant  
10045 2 y, it also adds to the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and hence increases  
osphere and hence increases the rate of climate change: deforestation of tropical forests contr 
15422 3                    the proliferation of invasive species is, together with habitat destruction, 
 habitat destruction, the main cause of biodiversity loss in marine ecosystems. alien species a 
biodiversity loss in marine ecosystems. alien species are considered invasive when they negativ 
10086 2  carbohydrates, the rates and nature of degradation of this organic material by microbial metab 
microbial taxa involved in carbohydrate degradation will be identified.  
14612 10 e response of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change and to understand their role in the glob 
obal carbon cycle. two major aspects of climate change are the increase in mean global temperat 
. one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change is the mediterranean basin. several mode 
hese areas. this would be of particular risk for arid and semiarid ecosystems such as those in  
se in the province of almeria where the risk of desertification is high. despite the extension  
e province of almeria where the risk of desertification is high. despite the extension of arid  
ables that control them under different climate change scenarios. at the same time, we will exp 
on of the expected results into current desertification models, in such a way that these could  
 these could be used to improve current desertification models by incorporating variables that  
es in carbon stocks and fluxes not only erosion factors.  
10939 1 al and assess different models for mass extinction at this time.  
14118 5 pheric carbon dioxide concentration and disturbance regimes have been occurring for decades in  
in it. it is expected, that with future climate change the frequencies, intensities and severit 
 will change and with that also natural disturbance processes and the responses of ecosystems t 
esponses of ecosystems to disturbances. fire is one of the most important natural disturbance i 
re is one of the most important natural disturbance in boreal forest. forest fires and the reco 
10891 3 possible detrimental effects of species extinction has led to a large research effort in recent 
etermine how ecosystems are affected by species loss. most of these studies have manipulated th 
 novel information about the effects of species loss on ecosystems and the mechanisms by which  
12710 2 e application of theoretical models and climate change adaptation principles in the landscape a 
at will enable biodiversity to adapt to climate change. •to provide a short best practice guida 
12723 2 e application of theoretical models and climate change adaptation principles in the landscape a 
at will enable biodiversity to adapt to climate change. •to provide a short best practice guida 
12480 2 s of water resource availability, flood risk, air quality, transport and biodiversity. however, 
d for different types of analyses, e.g. impacts of different policy options on ecosystem servic 
2154 1 potheses have been suggested, including eutrophication and climatic events. the saccharina proj 
14928 14 them become invasive in the new region. invasive species may monopolize local resources and out 
e, the understanding of determinants of biological invasions is a major research area of intern 
sibility, together with consequences of biological invasions. in the last decades it has been a 
plain the high propagation potential of invasive species, while less attention has been paid to 
 ability of successful establishment of exotic species in new regions. regarding the vulnerabil 
c species in new regions. regarding the vulnerability of ecosystems to be invaded, literature s 
 that environmental scenarios promoting biological invasions are frequently specific to each in 
vasions are frequently specific to each invasion event. finally, the effects of many plant inva 
the main hypotheses to be tested are: 1 alien species whose phenological pattern differs from t 
 for alien plants to get established. 5 invasive plants alter nutrient cycles and consequently  
s will be tested on a list of 100 alien invasive species of the iberian peninsula, while the re 
 be checked for particular but relevant invasion events in the inner iberian peninsula. the res 
bute to an early detection of potential invasive plants, to assess environmental impacts of pla 
of potential invasive plants, to assess environmental impacts of plant invasions, and will prov 
10687 1 many of these sudden episodes of severe global warming coincided with so-called mass extinction 
10731 3 is better. larger body size reduces the risk of being consumed by predators, and can also lead  
ood availability due to factors such as climate change. the proposed research will examine musc 
s of compensatory growth for individual risk-taking behaviour and reproductive success. finally 
14819 14                                    soil degradation due to human activity affects the quality o 
strial ecosystems and consequently, its biodiversity loss. this project tries to understand the 
e factors that have an influence on the biodiversity loss, to evaluate the interrelations betwe 
at integrate soil genesis aspects, soil degradation and its use with the biodiversity thematic. 
among the loss of organic material, the pollution caused by heavy metals and pesticides, and th 
ganic material, the pollution caused by heavy metals and pesticides, and the soil biological ac 
ject is to study the effect of the soil degradation on the biodiversity loss on different soils 
e effect of the soil degradation on the biodiversity loss on different soilsystems in the medit 
a that have suffered different sorts of degradation. the effect of organic material loss in soi 
er by agriculture or deforestation, the pollution by heavy metals on agroecosystems with alread 
ture or deforestation, the pollution by heavy metals on agroecosystems with already known accum 
 within the objective 3.1.causes of the biodiversity loss. habitats loss and fragmentation: eff 
he biodiversity loss. habitats loss and fragmentation: effects of soil degradation on ecosystem 
loss and fragmentation: effects of soil degradation on ecosystem functioning and biodiversity  
7671 1 l new suitable habitat may develop with climate change. the models output will play a central r 
13848 5 stem processes in the great lakes after invasion of this and similar species complement the stu 
per has changed substantially after the invasion. with the central role of this species in the  
pelagic food web, this implies that the invasion by cercopagis has resulted in a general food w 
e. to provide essential information for risk assessment of the invasion, further studies will e 
 information for risk assessment of the invasion, further studies will evaluate the potential i 
12309 3 ed threats from diseases as a result of climate change, which will bring milder, wetter winters 
mphasised the importance of arable crop disease control for climate change mitigation .  
ance of arable crop disease control for climate change mitigation .  
10788 3 ry for examining ecosystem responses to climate change, and it is vital that the biological cha 
ble to microbes and plants, and whether global warming will alter the nitrogen dynamics of anta 
k directly underpins policy relating to climate change and biodiversity in polar regions. the w 
10804 3 ry for examining ecosystem responses to climate change, and it is vital that the biological cha 
ble to microbes and plants, and whether global warming will alter the nitrogen dynamics of anta 
k directly underpins policy relating to climate change and biodiversity in polar regions. the w 
12014 4 ntal modifications such as those due to climate change could then be altered. changes in the co 
bay of biscay and guyana cases. greater impacts in the biscay case could be explained by heavie 
ity could be attributed only to fishing impacts as the temporal variability of the upwelling ma 
ing ecosystem effects of fishing and of climate change, the studied fisheries were able to part 
440 1 ecies across environmental gradients of disturbance and resource availability. to test this hyp 
6945 2 unities can also be a good indicator of degradation of karst environments due to human impacts. 
egradation of karst environments due to human impacts.  
10349 2 involved will help us to understand the impacts of changing dynamics on biodiversity and climat 
f changing dynamics on biodiversity and climate change  
11786 2 involved will help us to understand the impacts of changing dynamics on biodiversity and climat 
f changing dynamics on biodiversity and climate change.  
10818 1 ing water infiltration and evaporation, erosion and gas exchange. current regulatory guidelines 
11476 3 ations suggest that the initial step in degradation of mebr occurs via novel methyltransferase  
edge of the mechanisms of methyl halide degradation is at present limited to methyltransferases 
 characterise the initial steps in mebr degradation pathways. methyltransferases and related en 
10228 2 ictive models of processes essential to invasion success that can be used to underpin current p 
emediation and mitigation techniques of alien species in the uk and beyond.  
11625 3                                    wind erosion is a serious problem in many semi-arid environm 
erably in space and time. existing wind erosion models cannot easily be applied over several sc 
ability of remote sensing data for wind erosion models.  
13465 3 y several factors, including pathogens, biological invasions, climate change and pollution. hon 
luding pathogens, biological invasions, climate change and pollution. honeybees, and the plants 
iological invasions, climate change and pollution. honeybees, and the plants that rely on them, 
14514 1 es which are endangered or in danger of extinction. related to this model, germoplasm banks .  
15181 8 s thought to be the cause of the severe disease that affects pyrenean chamois populations. mort 
tudied. since 2001, severe outbreaks of disease have been reported in three important protected 
n other areas, we have not observed the disease or there have been only isolated cases of disea 
 there have been only isolated cases of disease. we have studied more than 100 affected chamois 
the epidemiological surveillance of the disease. the objectives are: 1. epidemiological surveil 
 epidemiological surveillance of border disease virus infection in the population of chamois fr 
ith monoclonal antibodies of the border disease virus isolated from diseased chamois. the resul 
 epidemiological characteristics of the disease.  
7509 1 o precisely characterize the outside of disease reproduction toxicity test animals. this incurs 
15334 1 ing, promoting reduction of fitness and extinction risks. bearing that in mind, eventual collec 
14588 1 elopment, under extreme temperature and drought. more than 80 olive varieties exists in extrema 
12404 4 ure in relation to chemical hazards and impacts in the marine environment. this will be in 5 mo 
 sampling; emerging contaminants; flood risk sediments; modifiers to chemical risk and human ex 
d risk sediments; modifiers to chemical risk and human exposure to chemical contaminants key cu 
 customer purpose: understanding of the impacts of chemicals in the marine environment remains  
15147 1 oduction and the assessment of predator risk. in particular, recent experimental and field stud 
13530 2 creased in frequency with anthropogenic impacts such as coastal eutrophication as likely contri 
h anthropogenic impacts such as coastal eutrophication as likely contributing factors. despite  
12365 1 waters and the prediction of biological impacts relevant to the uk marine environment and fishe 
14316 1 er environment. the possible links with climate change and global indices could help in designi 
15090 1 rm the chronic sediment bioassays for a risk assessment based on the bioaccumulation.  
7036 1 s of tertiary diversification and range fragmentation and pleistocene extinctions and range shi 
12675 1                  to assess the expected impacts of increasing the fees charged for cites licenc 
14157 3  study of the urban environment and the environmental impact of urbanisation, applying life cyc 
, substance and energy flux, methods of ecological footprint and spatial analysis. expansive la 
wellers is expressed in the increase of ecological footprint, special consumption of resources  
2079 1 g spawning herring was driven almost to extinction in the early 1970s, with significant social, 
10494 5 limate zone is more sensitive to global climate change than model predictions suggest and ecolo 
nah biomes to be extremely sensitive to climate change. however, the dynamics of how tropical v 
 of how tropical vegetation responds to climate change remains controversial. to explore the re 
 change through periods of known global climate change, e.g. through glacial-interglacial cycle 
ore vegetative response to rapid global climate change, e.g. heinrich events, during the period 
14231 2                                         global warming, along with a fast-growing agricultural  
ct the future response of vegetation to climate change and changing land use. to investigate th 
2013 10 tion. within the deforestation process, fire is used as a cheap tool to eliminate biomass, rele 
ap tool to eliminate biomass, releasing greenhouse gases such as co2 and ch4 to the atmosphere. 
2 and ch4 to the atmosphere. the use of fire is for a large part restricted to periods when fue 
s when fuels are dry enough to burn, so fire can only be used on a large scale when there is a  
mber can be significantly higher due to drought in the tropics, and humans taking advantage of  
cs, and humans taking advantage of this drought to more efficiently use fire to eliminate bioma 
of this drought to more efficiently use fire to eliminate biomass. most deforestation studies h 
practices, because of the importance of fire. i propose to further investigate links between cl 
r investigate links between climate and fire-driven deforestation using satellite measurements  
imate enhances or diminishes the use of fire as a tool for deforestation, influencing the build 
2030 4 is to understand how species respond to climate change and to predict consequences for communit 
e of top-down control, the release from natural enemies and subsequent evolution of increased c 
however, enemy release and evolution of invasive plants have been rarely, if ever, considered f 
ences in mobility between plants, their natural enemies and the predators of the enemies. in or 
13615 1                                  due to climate change the ranges of many plant species will sh 
9835 5                                         climate change is one of the major threats currently fa 
 biodiversity. predicting the impact of climate change for species requires the development of  
essary to integrate them with models of climate change impacts. i will use black-tailed godwits 
rate them with models of climate change impacts. i will use black-tailed godwits, for which is  
or model to predict the consequences of sea level rise and associated coastal management strate 
10007 3 h has responded to millions of years of climate change and can be an invaluable means to invest 
y how old the sediments are that record climate change. we will do this by looking at the magne 
ely investigating critical intervals of climate change. we will collaborate with scripps instit 
1105 2 disseminated to promote knowledge about climate change and the mitigating effect, that agro-for 
hat agro-forestal systems might have on climate change to an large and diverse audience. the pr 
10850 1                          the effects of climate change in a dynamic competitive interaction bet 
10476 12                one of the most striking impacts of human development is the replacement of natu 
d increasingly isolated. this so called habitat fragmentation causes many problems for wildlife 
f ecosystem services. not surprisingly, habitat fragmentation has become one of the most intens 
biology. despite the existence of major disturbance phenomena in marine ecosystems, the effects 
na in marine ecosystems, the effects of habitat fragmentation in marine systems have barely bee 
ispersal. although the lack of study of habitat fragmentation in marine ecosystems is understan 
vation agenda, primarily because of the impacts of climate change. in 1998, for example, unusua 
da, primarily because of the impacts of climate change. in 1998, for example, unusually high se 
oral reefs, the constraints to studying fragmentation in marine systems have recently been lift 
he four key ingredients needed to study climate change impacts on marine habitats. these are .  
redients needed to study climate change impacts on marine habitats. these are . lastly, we unde 
s of the model by simulating the actual disturbance histories of reefs since 1950 and comparing 
10044 1  uncertainly regarding the influence of climate change on structure of marine fish assemblages, 
10895 4         the world is experiencing rapid climate change with a predicted rise in global average  
s. among a range of predicted ecosystem impacts, one already documented is a temperature-driven 
, disperse slowly cannot adapt to rapid climate change within the lifespan of individuals. fore 
be among the first habitats impacted by climate change, a realisation driving the search for ap 
11708 4         the world is experiencing rapid climate change with a predicted rise in global average  
s. among a range of predicted ecosystem impacts, one already documented is a temperature-driven 
, disperse slowly cannot adapt to rapid climate change within the lifespan of individuals. fore 
be among the first habitats impacted by climate change, a realisation driving the search for ap 
7479 10 g the precise nature and rate of future climate change, even the most moderate scenarios predic 
sociated major environmental and social impacts. to prepare society for the necessary mitigatio 
synthesis of eu research results on the impacts of climate change on the marine environment and 
f eu research results on the impacts of climate change on the marine environment and to make th 
pean research results on the effects of climate change on marine environment. an up-to-date ove 
wledge and perception on the effects of climate change on marine environments and their socio-e 
ies. enhancement of public knowledge on climate change impacts on the marine environment, inclu 
t of public knowledge on climate change impacts on the marine environment, including the socio- 
o communicate with european citizens on impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems.  
te with european citizens on impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems.  
12660 4 the uk on the strength of links between climate change and migratory species’ behaviour, abunda 
distribution and passed a resolution on climate change, which amongst other things, called for  
ection and monitoring of climate-change impacts on migratory species, so that information acros 
g the threats to migratory species from climate change.  
2000 2 e. virtually nothing is known about how climate change and changes in atmospheric n deposition  
to investigate the long-term effects of climate change on plant species composition and carbon  
14737 4  studies have considered the effects of climate change on ecosystem functioning, and on plant a 
ore effort is needed to investigate the impacts at community level, particularly in forests. at 
icularly in forests. at regional scale, climate change may produce modifications in species dis 
st that abrupt changes may appear after drought thresholds are achieved. these experiments will 
14823 2 es that ecotones are very vulnerable to climate change. environmental limitations to the distri 
e for better management of forest under climate change conditions  
482 1 ronmental change: for example, regional extinction rates of european butterflies have exceeded  
12592 2                                         climate change has been identified by the draft soil st 
 be directly and indirectly impacted by climate change, but the consequences of such effects ar 
7673 1 stems resources, and how this behaviour impacts biodiversity. the abms will be used to prospect 
10889 5                                         climate change is now recognized as having major impact 
hange is now recognized as having major impacts on the ecology of terrestrial, freshwater and m 
the timing of this bloom as a result of climate change have been demonstrated and shown to have 
ly and are also sensitive indicators of climate change. their larvae are also important compone 
ous nerc grant to understand effects of climate change on adult populations of benthic organism 
13587 1 water quality management in the face of climate change.  
2056 3                                         climate change scenarios predict that arctic regions wi 
nd changes anywhere on the globe due to global warming in the coming decades. this is of great  
ve model to assess the impact of future climate change on these animals and the ecosystem they  
1997 9 nfluential hypotheses: the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, the chaos and biodiversity hypo 
pothesis. according to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis', biodiversity is highest at int 
biodiversity is highest at intermediate disturbance levels. climatic variability is an importan 
ariability is an important component of disturbance in aquatic ecosystems. climate change can t 
t of disturbance in aquatic ecosystems. climate change can thus be expected to affect biodivers 
 to affect biodiversity by changing the disturbance regime. according to the chaos and biodiver 
diversity. according to this hypothesis climate change is likely to affect biodiversity by chan 
ty composition as well as biodiversity. climate change may potentially push these ecosystems to 
tools to assess the potential impact of climate change on aquatic biodiversity. the integrative 
1999 3 nfluential theories: - the intermediate-disturbance hypothesis - the chaos & biodiversity hypot 
 to predict different relations between global warming and biodiversity. to explore the potenti 
tools to assess the potential impact of climate change on aquatic biodiversity.  
1998 4 heories as guidance: - the intermediate-disturbance hypothesis - the chaos & biodiversity hypot 
 to predict different relations between global warming and biodiversity. this is a first indica 
 and genetic adaptation, and changes in disturbance regimes will affect biodiversity in these t 
tools to assess the potential impact of climate change on aquatic biodiversity.  
2179 2 id moths constitute the most pronounced disturbance factor in sub-arctic birch forest that some 
birch forest under various scenarios of climate change.  
14665 4 ntains transitional climate zones where climate change may have the greatest effects. in the ar 
s highly variable in space and time and drought phenomenon often occurs climate change plays a  
ime and drought phenomenon often occurs climate change plays a decisive role on the dynamics of 
stems. in this context, the analysis of climate change and its variability is of great interest 
2078 3 nd species-composition as a response to climate change it is important to consider comparable i 
f organisms differ in their response to climate change. this enables an identification of areas 
 a particularly high economic andnature vulnerability.  
2109 1  order to predict the effects of future climate change in this ecotone. we plan to provide info 
13612 4 m model-based predictions on how future climate change will affect european biodiversity. curre 
pecies distribution models suggest that climate change will cause habitats to shift or contract 
wards, and will result in high rates of extinction for the coming 100 years. however, such pred 
empo and mode of population response to climate change, as well as to evaluate, adjust and empl 
15565 4 m model-based predictions on how future climate change will affect european biodiversity. curre 
pecies distribution models suggest that climate change will cause habitats to shift or contract 
wards, and will result in high rates of extinction for the coming 100 years. however, such pred 
empo and mode of population response to climate change, as well as to evaluate, adjust and empl 
10413 3 ronmental change: for example, regional extinction rates of european butterflies have exceeded  
nt insects such as ants that have major impacts on all other species in their environment. here 
here we propose to measure the combined impacts of human-induced changes in climate and habitat 
13747 1 ronmental change: for example, regional extinction rates of european butterflies have exceeded  
15566 1 ronmental change: for example, regional extinction rates of european butterflies have exceeded  
14140 1 stem changes taking into account future climate change projections.  
6736 4 ent cardiac arrhythmias and an incresed risk of sudden cardiac death. the genetic research on c 
 these include not only to find all the disease associated genetic loci and subsequently the in 
stand the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. however, our current knowledge on these disord 
tion would represent invaluable tool in risk stratification, which is incomplete at the moment. 
12588 2 l carbon levels related to land use and climate change are highly uncertain, so evidence-based  
 data on soil carbon and the release of greenhouse gases in relation to land management. this w 
10137 4 he oceans have restricted the extent of global warming by taking up approximately 50% of the co 
ers ambient ph in a phenomenon known as ocean acidification . an important facet of ocean acidi 
n acidification . an important facet of ocean acidification is a decline in the concentration o 
future warming by emitting more or less greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrous oxi 
11019 4 he oceans have restricted the extent of global warming by taking up approximately 50% of the co 
ers ambient ph in a phenomenon known as ocean acidification . an important facet of ocean acidi 
n acidification . an important facet of ocean acidification is a decline in the concentration o 
future warming by emitting more or less greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrous oxi 
15028 2                               while the impacts of fishing on fish populations and demersal and 
 documented for commercial fishing, the impacts of artisanal and recreational fishing -as well  
14318 1 emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries program. un-redd+ w 
15583 2 and ecological landscapes are evolving. climate change, deforestation, and degradation critical 
ing. climate change, deforestation, and degradation critically influence their biodiversity, in 
13455 1 eefs have been damaged by trawling, and ocean acidification is a developing threat for the reef 
13578 3 es dominated by forestry. anthropogenic climate change may further reduce their abundance. the  
y of forestry-sensitive species. during climate change, high colonizing ability is essential to 
lonization is also crucial to cope with forest fragmentation and the shifting mosaic of a lands 
13462 2 ves, e.g. colonization capacity. during climate change, high colonizing capacity is essential t 
lonization is also crucial to cope with forest fragmentation and the shifting mosaic of a lands 
15321 2 tors that will provide new insight into climate change in regions as sensitive to global warmin 
imate change in regions as sensitive to global warming as are deserts.  
15327 3   the recent intergovernmental panel on climate change report predicted large temperature incre 
on attention needs to focus not only on global warming and each of the other stressors individu 
ssential services they provide. current impacts on stream ecosystems will most likely interact  
9857 1 are currently experiencing accelerating climate change. the layers of ocean sediments in these  
9892 1 are currently experiencing accelerating climate change. the layers of ocean sediments in these  
14149 5  the project is to measure the combined impacts of environmental variability on the structure a 
g abiotic processes we study mechanical disturbance, current flow, water stratification, sedime 
on, oxygen deficiency, salinity regime, pollution, and among biotic processes the introduction  
ng biotic processes the introduction of invasive alien species, primary and secondary productio 
de the knowledge base of the integrated impacts of multiple pressures and to support innovative 
14898 8 . moreover, due to their sensibility to climate change and habitat alteration and fragmentation 
imate change and habitat alteration and fragmentation, are widely used as bioindicators. howeve 
cies, some of them endemic and/or under risk of extinction, is still limited to the point that  
me of them endemic and/or under risk of extinction, is still limited to the point that the prec 
selected according to their endemicity, risk of extinction, unresolved taxonomy, and possible e 
 according to their endemicity, risk of extinction, unresolved taxonomy, and possible existence 
e studied. iolana is cataloged as under risk of extinction in spain. 3. pyrgus alveus/bellieri. 
d. iolana is cataloged as under risk of extinction in spain. 3. pyrgus alveus/bellieri. the pre 
11836 1 daptation to water stress/physiological drought, or are connected with withstanding heavy metal 
15252 3  that tropical amphibians are at higher risk of extinction to global warming since their enviro 
opical amphibians are at higher risk of extinction to global warming since their environmental  
ans are at higher risk of extinction to global warming since their environmental temperatures a 
15403 1  the consequences that this type of bio-invasion has had on other islands devoid of large herbi 
13709 1 ntial as a tool for control of pest and disease insects. by using whole genome sequencing and c 
10525 2 riatoma infestans-is a vector of chagas disease, transferring disease causing trypanosomes to h 
 vector of chagas disease, transferring disease causing trypanosomes to humans. in understandin 
15137 1 le responses of each species studied to climate change.  
7662 8                    for two decades, the vulnerability of aquatic species is observed in estuari 
ts strongly anthropised. processing and habitat loss are probably the major cause of loss of bi 
diversity. context for two decades, the vulnerability of aquatic species is observed in estuari 
ts strongly anthropised. processing and habitat loss are probably the major cause of loss of bi 
of water bodies. beside this, the water pollution by chemicals, the result of massive industria 
also human health. the effects of multi-pollution are still not well known on continental aquat 
l relevance therefore has to assess the vulnerability of a species. However, genotoxicity integ 
he zebra mussel. the zebra mussel is an invasive species widely distributed in temperate aquati 
12617 4          the extent of feedback between climate change and the terrestrial carbon cycle is one  
 uncertainties in predictions of future climate change. soil carbon dynamics are a key element  
across all types of land use, a link to climate change was suggested. subsequent studies have s 
uggested. subsequent studies have shown climate change probably was in part responsible, but th 
14202 1 e useful for estimation of the relative risk of human and livestock zoonoses as well as for eva 
14656 2  a consequence of the action of diverse impacts both of a global and local character. local phe 
 the combined effect of uv-b with other impacts  
7720 2 be. however, if we observe that genetic erosion of food plants most often the result of a cultu 
nts most often the result of a cultural erosion men, we still do not know quantify. this projec 
10181 3  warbler. although once on the verge of extinction this species now has three healthy populatio 
ly changing environment - either due to climate change or habitat loss.  
nment - either due to climate change or habitat loss.  
7490 2  consequences for outbreaks of pests or invasive species. soilservice will link ecological and  
il ecosystem services are vulnerable to disturbance.  
13337 1 l processes which may result in genetic erosion. wp4 will provide a decision matrix module to a 
15241 1  least, it is also caused by knlowledge fragmentation. in effect, most research is oriented to  
7433 1 wetlands. it will: -d'établir levels of vulnerability of different wetland types in terms of ge 
7155 2 ones and increase of agricultural land. habitat loss and fragmentation resulting from this land 
 of agricultural land. habitat loss and fragmentation resulting from this landscape transformat 
10267 2 sources from them and potentially cause disease. the parasite has a set of genes that makes it  
higher temperatures, and hence a higher risk of infection in the population. the current propos 
15000 2  may have higher growth rates and lower extinction risks. however, there are different ways lea 
ility can reduce individual fitness and risk population viability. as most habitats in our plan 
7220 1  level. eventually, we hope to stop the erosion of biodiversity of marine birds in the region w 
7471 1 l processes which may result in genetic erosion. wp4 will provide a decision matrix module to a 
225 1 st important aspects in conservation of endangered species. on the other hand, species consist  
9916 1  an essential tool in the management of endangered species such as the green turtle . in order  
14829 5                 the genetic analyses of endangered species can contribute to the knowledge of t 
 determinants of population decline and fragmentation, to determine the contribution of genetic 
f genetic factors to the probability of extinction and to optimize conservation and management  
uous and intense process of decline and fragmentation, leaving the species on the verge of exti 
on, leaving the species on the verge of extinction. during the last years several conservation  
13414 1 on programme aims to prevent process of extinction, to provide descriptive information about th 
13412 2 is one of the cattle breeds with a high risk of extinction. project has been launched in 1995 b 
f the cattle breeds with a high risk of extinction. project has been launched in 1995 by genera 
12174 1 eeks to review current knowledge of the impacts of widely practised vegetation management on th 
6959 3 tem resistance to disturbances, such as climate change, and, in certain biotopes, it has been s 
een shown to provide protection against invasive species. the aim of this project is the evalua 
 due to intensification of land use and climate change in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems wi 
2526 1  experts in ecology, ecotoxicology, and risk assessment from 16 institutes and 8 nations. it is 
10436 2 trinsic processes such as predation and disease to determine the match between patterns of cons 
e habitat for populations of consumers. habitat loss is one of the principal causes of species  
2014 1 ific seeds through the action of shared natural enemies , context-dependent seed predation, and 
12611 4  and have high environmental and social impacts. a number of different methods will be used to  
ded benefits in terms of costs or wider environmental impacts they could bring. this will be us 
essment of the environmental and social impacts and benefits of each remediation technique will 
include direct costs and wider economic impacts and benefits. understanding these aspects will  
10404 1 ividuals in a community has significant impacts on plant productivity by affecting competitive  
7414 1  surfaces headland including highlights biodiversity loss through a lessening of honey resource 
12746 1  of biodiversity and the key drivers of biodiversity loss. it contains a succinct overview of t 
14888 1 ffective agents that cause the allergic disease, being in spain the most frequent cause of rhin 
10315 4 abilise the global climate by absorbing greenhouse gases and it supplies some of the key nutrie 
 a whole. there is strong evidence that risk posed by climate change is more severe and imminen 
e is strong evidence that risk posed by climate change is more severe and imminent for the sout 
ojections of the biological response to climate change. the second workshop, for which we are r 
7515 1 pulations of dusky groupers, iconic and endangered species of the mediterranean, in a dual obje 
2483 1 t 60% of the world's coral reefs are at risk from human activity. we currently do not understan 
12662 1                    to assess the likely impacts on business .  
11436 1  assumption underlying the evolution of disease resistance is that the maintenance and activati 
12667 4 , cap reform, agri-environment schemes, environmental impact assessment, air pollution impacts, 
s, environmental impact assessment, air pollution impacts, water framework directive, soil stra 
mental impact assessment, air pollution impacts, water framework directive, soil strategy and c 
 framework directive, soil strategy and climate change programme. new methods of data collectio 
10042 1 . the ability of corals to recover from disturbance is highly dependent on the abundance of the 
7195 3 lations are particularly affected. this erosion is primarily due to a combination of habitat lo 
on is primarily due to a combination of habitat loss and degradation of habitat quality. the in 
ue to a combination of habitat loss and degradation of habitat quality. the interactions betwee 
444 3   among current global changes, habitat degradation is the principal cause of biodiversity loss 
t degradation is the principal cause of biodiversity loss. the aim of this project was to study 
ndependent bird survey dataset. habitat disturbance affecting landscapes between 1992 and 2002  
11387 4                                         eutrophication of freshwaters is a serious problem in m 
rished invertebrate fauna by the 1980s. eutrophication-driven biodiversity loss is a concern in 
una by the 1980s. eutrophication-driven biodiversity loss is a concern in many uk reservoirs wh 
cological benefit and design options. a risk assessment will be made relating to the spreading  
2116 1 ive. in the project we will compare the vulnerability of agriculture to goose grazing in two sp 
12200 1 nd monitoring the direct and cumulative impacts of environmental stewardship on landscape chara 
15522 1 e to reduced water availability owed to global warming, which is further enhanced by increased  
12143 1 mpact on patterns of species migration, invasion and adaptation.  
13316 17                    effective control of invasive alien species has been hampered by: a the lack 
mpered by: a the lack of monitoring for alien species at frequent enough intervals in regions o 
tions, and warn of new sightings; and c risk assessments that predict the likelihood of a parti 
 of detection, quantifying the possible risk, and warning managers before a respective alien sp 
nd warning managers before a respective alien species spreads beyond its point of initial intro 
alert regional managers an inventory of alien species against which invasive alien species can  
nventory of alien species against which invasive alien species can be determined, a european in 
rly detection and monitoring system for alien species in response to these requirements, daisie 
ropean one-stop-shop for information on biological invasions in europe. it will bring together: 
e. it will bring together: the european alien species expertise registry: a directory of resear 
ry of researchers and research european alien species database: including all known naturalized 
tabase: including all known naturalized alien species in europe european invasive alien species 
alized alien species in europe european invasive alien species information system: descriptions 
system: descriptions of all naturalized alien species known to be invasive in europe species di 
tial analysis: distribution maps of all invasive alien species in europe known or suspected of  
ted of having environmental or economic impacts. daisie will be a pivotal instrument in develop 
ress the need for a regional network of invasive alien species information.  
12565 3 the wild, and investigate the potential impacts of theses changes in the freshwater environment 
d and stocked fish. study the potential impacts of light pollution with the aim of developing a 
h. study the potential impacts of light pollution with the aim of developing an appropriate res 
12237 5  previously funded annual monitoring of disease and pest levels and agronomic practice in winte 
olicy making which aims to mitigate the impacts of crop diseases and pests and unsustainable ma 
 are also a key resource for monitoring impacts of climate change on uk agriculture by measurin 
 key resource for monitoring impacts of climate change on uk agriculture by measuring indicator 
evelopment and validation of models for disease and pest forecasting and identification of sust 
10302 1 to discussions of cultural responses to climate change. while its specific meaning will probabl 
13788 2                   forest management and fire suppression cause significant changes in the chemi 
 is possible that some are dependent on fire-affected wood or other deadwood qualities resultin 
10646 2 t climate models used to predict future climate change. detailed reconstruction of lead-lag rel 
etween regions in the context of global climate change. here we use an annually laminated sedim 
13856 2 hanges of predation rates through human disturbance of natural environments could disrupt the f 
 species to behaviourally influence the risk of predation, a question that has received little  
1993 4 ers, as it contributes to assessing the environmental impact of projected climate change in aqu 
g the environmental impact of projected climate change in aquatic systems. the anticipated resu 
will be well-founded predictions on the risk of cascading effects due to climate change and the 
on the risk of cascading effects due to climate change and the potential for adaptation to rest 
7302 5              anthropogenic accelerating extinction rates makes urgent the identification of the 
s urgent the identification of the most endangered species and risk factors. island avifauna ha 
tion of the most endangered species and risk factors. island avifauna have strongly suffered fr 
ve strongly suffered from the impact of invasive species. this project, which includes the cons 
 assessment of the role of invasions in extinction events and rarefaction of indigenous birds,  
12465 1 jectives, preferences, and attitudes to risk.  
11440 8 ent is known as the permo-triassic mass extinction and was the greatest calamity that ever befe 
ant gap in our understanding of how the extinction in the oceans and on land were linked. two e 
 at almost exactly the same time as the extinction. volcanic eruptions such as this are often a 
ocumented event that coincides with the extinction is the loss of dissolved oxygen from the oce 
ropped drastically just before the mass extinction whilst the amount of hydrogen sulphide rose  
ig mixing event that coincides with the extinction in the oceans. this huge mixing of the ocean 
ulphur was in the atmosphere during the extinction event, where it came from, and what effect i 
as around, prior to and during the mass extinction event. we will also measure its stable isoto 
12246 1 ctions in the context of adaptations to climate change and model predicted  
12637 3 agment across the uk, and tackling soil degradation threats by 2030, this project will provide  
h half of england’s farmers having seen soil erosion on their land, which costs british agricul 
the annual cost of flooding due to soil degradation has been conservatively estimated at betwee 
11113 2                                         degradation of complex dissolved organic matter . this  
iety, pressure of coastal resources and climate change.  
12222 2 ng pesticide use and minimising diffuse pollution. the first specific objective of this project 
t. the modules are: weed manager, wheat disease manager, oilseed rape manager - pests and disea 
15106 3                                         fire is widely accepted as one of the underlying factor 
s project, we will explore whether post-fire regeneration mode between populations under simila 
 mode between populations under similar fire regimes.  
15107 3                                         fire is widely accepted as one of the underlying factor 
s project, we will explore whether post-fire regeneration mode between populations under simila 
 mode between populations under similar fire regimes.  
541 3 d the way environmental variability and climate change have affected and will affect ecosystems 
 marked animals to study the effects of climate change on a range of vertebrate populations and 
 recommendations to efficiently address impacts of climate effects on vital rates in natural ve 
7126 2 sis to compare the potential effects of climate change on vertebrates with contrasting life his 
r groups are more likely than others to climate change according to their population strategy,  
7187 1 ke it an exceptional model for studying biological invasions usually. in this project, we have  
1990 5            parasites defined broadly as disease causing organisms - are ubiquitous and exercise 
determine the incidence and severity of disease, and thus a deep understanding of the way disea 
nd thus a deep understanding of the way disease shapes host population structure stands to enha 
efforts to mitigate damaging effects of disease and pests. despite the strong selection by para 
t in a deeper understanding of the ways disease shapes host genetic structure and of those conf 
12772 2                        diffuse sediment pollution causes a number of negative impacts on freshw 
t pollution causes a number of negative impacts on freshwater ecology including fish and macroi 
12626 27                                         soil erosion in england and wales was not considered to 
ations in england and wales to quantify erosion or to establish the risk of erosion occurring i 
to quantify erosion or to establish the risk of erosion occurring in the future. though on a gl 
ify erosion or to establish the risk of erosion occurring in the future. though on a global sca 
f these studies underline the fact that soil erosion rates may not be high, the consensus in th 
the consensus in the literature is that soil erosion in england and wales often occurs at an ac 
ent techniques have been used to assess soil erosion in england and wales. these include: direc 
. these include: direct measurements of erosion features through surveying, remote sensing and  
and aerial photography of the extent of erosion, monitoring of erosion plots' and catchments to 
of the extent of erosion, monitoring of erosion plots' and catchments to observe erosion, traci 
rosion plots' and catchments to observe erosion, tracing soil erosion using geochemical and rad 
 catchments to observe erosion, tracing soil erosion using geochemical and radionuclide analysi 
 radionuclide analysis and modelling of erosion using a suite of different software. thus, the  
t software. thus, the evidence base for erosion is extensive, but is made up of many lines of e 
eed, different techniques to understand erosion are appropriate in different environments. the  
different environments. the large-scale erosion of peaty uplands, for example, has been studied 
eys and aerial photography, whereas the erosion from intensively-managed grasslands has best be 
hesis of all the information describing soil erosion in england and wales and a framework that  
llow us to improve our understanding of erosion both in terms of future predictions but also in 
 objectives to improve understanding of soil erosion in england and wales and to develop a way  
and to develop a way forward to monitor soil erosion. objective one will be to deliver an in-de 
y world-leading experts in the field of soil erosion, who have already contributed dozens of re 
ed dozens of research papers describing soil erosion in england and wales to the research liter 
a consensus as to how we should monitor soil erosion in the future. objective two will bring to 
 will bring together a wide spectrum of erosion experts, including scientists as well as stakeh 
to refine our understanding of previous erosion research and suggest a feasible approach that w 
 national-scale monitoring programme of erosion in the future.  
12770 2 these species are acutely vulnerable to human impacts, and in the case of eps found in the uk,  
 case of eps found in the uk, it is the impacts of lawful activities, rather than persecution,  
14572 3   during the last decades, the study of biological invasions has been structured in turn of a c 
the biotic resistance of communities to invasion, which emphasizes the negative biotic interact 
ich makes them especially vulnerable to biological invasions.  
15460 1 hat shape the viability, persistence or extinction of small populations, under a frame of habit 
15128 3                             accelerated climate change and other important environmental change 
system is one of the most vulnerable to climate change. the purpose of this project is to study 
ell as their relevance as a response to climate change; and 4 identify phenological, physiologi 
10968 1 n zooplankton production, examining how climate change may alter secondary production. although 
11779 1 w alterations in bacterial biodiversity impacts on ecosystem functions such as the mineralizati 
11813 1 fish. indeed, in the current context of climate change and overfishing, coastal seas are threat 
10565 2 rstanding important processes including disease spread, information transmission, and food-web  
 their environments and, in the case of disease transmission, important for developing preventa 
12375 2 ist we begin to recognise the potential impacts of increasing acidification in our seas we have 
ementation of a monitoring programme. a risk based approach will be adopted and the models deve 
11680 1 ecies. this process is sometimes called invasion and it is regarded as one of the major threats 
12292 2                             sclerotinia disease caused by the plant pathogenic fungus sclerotin 
o has negative environmental and social impacts. an alternative approach is to investigate the  
12683 3 es and locations of coastal habitats at risk from effects of climate change, and to identify la 
oastal habitats at risk from effects of climate change, and to identify large scale opportuniti 
reat sites under different scenarios of sea level rise.  
12679 1 ies in great britain. •a measure of the impacts of invasive non-native species.  
12528 3 knowledge about the epidemiology of the disease, nor by predictive modelling of how interventio 
cales of the epidemic so as to optimise disease control and management • how do intervention st 
he prevalence and further spread of the disease • how does uncertainty about pathogen biology a 
7570 1  important and necessary because of the risk of loss of knowledge and memory of these collectio 
11118 1 a technique by which controlled thermal degradation of a macromolecule is achieved, thereby pro 
11282 2 ophic mires, are extremely sensitive to climate change. precipitation is the only source of wat 
mperatures given the current debates on global warming. where macrofossils are unidentifiable i 
12532 1 mide as soon as possible. the increased risk of movement of economically damaging pests on the  
11134 4 cern about the impact of diffuse source pollution on river, estuarine and coastal water quality 
rd to non-compliance of bathing waters. climate change, and particularly more intense storms in 
e occurrences at amroth and rhyl. hydro-environmental impact assessment modelling studies, regu 
mulations, which can lead to erromneous environmental impact assessment outcomes. these shortco 
12245 1 ck products to be produced with minimal environmental impact. the ifm wheel' is widely adopted  
14600 2 his gap, this project aims to develop a risk-based methodological tool for the integrated manag 
he development of the tool will combine risk assessment . this project will help assess the rel 
6960 1 distribution, 6. resistance to invasive weeds, 7. indicator moth species. these cover a wide ra 
14615 1 ns to a critical state. one of the main impacts on cetaceans, and in particular on dolphins, po 
163 1 s the attitudes of local people and the impacts of land use changes to the bird fauna will be a 
7678 3  land-use patterns. plant canopies have impacts on local climates and air movement patterns via 
nd water vapor and on turbulence. these impacts are also influenced by neighboring canopies, to 
 zones with microclimates favorable for disease, and 2 estimate the potential for aerial dissem 
7498 1 nobacter alcalivorax and high potential degradation. these bacterial genera appear to play an i 
2019 1 our knowledge of normal development and disease, including congenital malformation and abnormal 
10652 1 and forest engineers: identification of endangered species or groups of species. those tools wi 
11832 1 and forest engineers: identification of endangered species or groups of species. those tools wi 
7702 1  ecosystems and deep expertise of their vulnerability to an intensification of wood samples. th 
14431 1 ic ohrid lake; 2. the first evidence of human impact on the lake environment in remote mountain 
11459 2 eep-sea fauna was depauperate following extinction events associated with past global climate c 
tion events associated with past global climate change causing, for example, deep-ocean oxygen  
11031 2 at crust of those ages was destroyed by erosion, a process we can see happening today. the data 
al age peaks were produced primarily by erosion. our research focuses on the isotope 187os, bec 
11061 1 ormation is important to understand the risk of farmed fish to wild stocks. we will answer this 
1962 1 vores have potential harmful effects on natural enemies, and hence could lead to incompatibilit 
10338 4 arth became extinct in the largest mass extinction in over 600 million years. this worldwide ev 
o possible causal events such as global climate change, asteroid impacts and volcanism. establi 
such as global climate change, asteroid impacts and volcanism. establishing absolute ages of ro 
s could be constructed to study the p-t extinction and other key events in earth history. recen 
12023 1 be either direct, via a modification of disturbance regimes and of soil fertility, or indirect, 
6719 2 ious diseases of stone fruits. the most endangered species are: sour cherry, apricot, plum and  
 plum and - recent years - almond. this disease can cause significant loss of yield in epidemic 
13603 2 e activities associated with crustacean disease diagnosis across the european union and ensure  
molecular effect of the juvenile higher disease prevalence and the assumed high mortality cause 
15503 1 aphy, structure and quality of habitat, human impact or historical climate changes affect the d 
1936 1 e insight in the potential dispersal of endangered species and the sustainability of the restor 
12149 1 for mitigation measures to stop further invasion and to reduce impact on ecosystems.  
6871 1  of algae. in the same time flood, as a disturbance factor plays a key role in community organi 
2479 4                                         alien species represent a growing threat to marine envi 
nked among the world's most detrimental invasive species, was first observed in northern europe 
dation on mnemiopsis, and the cascading impacts of abundant juvenile and mature mnemiopsis on d 
succession in pelagic ecosystems due to invasive species and/or increased numbers of gelatinous 
12056 1                                 context climate change , was created and a complete phylogeny o 
15524 2 mus, which putatively confront a higher risk of extinction. finally, always in a phylogenetic c 
ch putatively confront a higher risk of extinction. finally, always in a phylogenetic context,  
7410 1 ional genes, and evolution of microbial degradation capacity of organohalogen compounds in the  
7533 2 aphically distant but sets currently at risk of food insecurity comparable, madagascar, island  
f ​​cultivation of yams in west africa. fragmentation of communities leading to a diversificati 
14675 1 tion to nutrient uptake, improvement of drought tolerance and to the facilitation process. ther 
421 1 use intensity and biodiversity also has impacts on soil communities, leading to an expected com 
15520 1 nse to adverse conditions, particularly drought. 4 analysis of mortality and regeneration rates 
11874 1 ry for examining ecosystem responses to climate change, and it is vital that the biological cha 
10034 3 ible for nitrogen cycling in acid soils nitrification is essential to the cycling of nitrogen t 
idisers. although an essential process, nitrification can also have deleterious consequences. a 
can be readily leached resulting in the pollution of groundwaters that may be used to supply dr 
10255 4                       concentrations of greenhouse gases are rising as a result of continued in 
cosystems to perturbations under future climate change and important potential impacts on globa 
 climate change and important potential impacts on global biodiversity impacts.  
otential impacts on global biodiversity impacts.  
11464 1  e.g. reduction in water quality due to pollution. we will use our model to test whether lake t 
11799 1  e.g. reduction in water quality due to pollution. we will use our model to test whether lake t 
10189 4 ods of co-occurrence. hence introducing natural enemies can be an effective biological control  
ly generalist, it has been assumed that introduced species can associate as effectively with in 
zal partners cannot be an impediment to invasion success. new evidence undermines these assumpt 
t into the causes of variation in plant invasion success.  
10736 1 derstand how organisms respond to metal pollution, and the molecular mechanisms underlying eith 
13610 1 nderstanding of non-linear responses to eutrophication and regime shifts in aquatic systems, bu 
13790 1 iometry will help to predict effects of eutrophication and loss of riparian vegetation on benth 
11604 2         captive breeding programmes for endangered species run the risk of both genetic drift a 
ogrammes for endangered species run the risk of both genetic drift and inbreeding depression. h 
10345 1 e marsh or freshwater species. although eutrophication has been cited as one of the reasons for 
10241 1  for example by habitat degredation and fragmentation. the programme therefore accords with the 
11100 1  for example by habitat degredation and fragmentation. the programme therefore accords with the 
2169 1 r threats in the near future. these are invasive species. the project focuses on terrestrial ve 
15389 1 rends suggest that one of the most hard impacts on aquatic resources will be both the reduction 
11492 6 resource management under anthropogenic climate change and for understanding the earth system,  
e sub-types of c4 photosynthesis confer drought tolerance, whilst others are linked with drough 
olerance, whilst others are linked with drought sensitivity or are these correlations unrelated 
direct effect of c4 physiology on plant drought tolerance, will be tested with phylogenetically 
 influences plant water relations under drought. our second hypothesis, that there is an import 
 an important phylogenetic component to drought tolerance in the c4 grasses, will be tested wit 
10693 1 cycle, which is of great importance for global warming. it is important to know exactly how muc 
9880 5 irals of environmental change, zoonotic disease and poverty emerge, and the thresholds and tipp 
 an african-european dynamic drivers of disease in africa consortium - the dddac - positioned t 
nderstandings of the dynamic drivers of disease in african settings, and their interrelationshi 
yered analysis of regions and people at risk , relating the localised experiences of different  
oaches to mitigate negative environment-disease dynamics and help build resilience and adaptive 
7463 1 ndscape and regional predictions of the impacts of global change, acid deposition, and land use 
15319 3 opulations may be highly susceptible to extinction due to environmental stochasticity and the l 
ty and the loss of genetic variability. extinction risk is even higher if interaction among ind 
loss of genetic variability. extinction risk is even higher if interaction among individuals is 
15391 5                         the decline and fragmentation of populations implies an increase in gen 
e in turn may affect the probability of extinction through associated decreases in adaptive pot 
 relevant to counter risks arising from disease, is that involved in immune response. the effec 
 reproduction and becomes an additional risk factor for the persistence of the species. the pro 
onservation genetics and contributes to risk assessment and to the design of effective strategi 
14602 7 orest-type vegetation. in this context, fire dynamics play a critical role given than an increa 
 regeneration of natural vegetation and fire. the general objective of the project is to be abl 
ndscapes originate land abandonment and fire dynamics will be essential to establish future con 
o a useful evaluation tool of potential impacts of global change on biodiversity patterns in dy 
atterns in dynamic landscapes driven by fire in mediterranean. the particular specific objectiv 
ments of open habitat created by forest fire impact. 2- assessment of the patterns in distribut 
erent scenarios of landscape change and fire regime.  
13880 1 uccess and behaviour connected to human disturbance of birds on protected and unprotected islan 
7147 1  western europe paleogene of the recent human impact in the last millennia. geochemical analyze 
10125 18 g of the ecology of species decline and extinction is imperative in the current age of escalati 
in the current age of escalating global biodiversity loss. however, although meta-analyses have 
tantial new insights into correlates of extinction risk in well-studied vertebrate groups, rela 
 insights into correlates of extinction risk in well-studied vertebrate groups, relatively litt 
 known about fundamental aspects of the extinction process, such as the biogeography of range c 
hy of range contraction and collapse in endangered species. in particular, existing databases t 
tions, and so contain biases which make extinction-proneness studies difficult to interpret. la 
lt to interpret. large-scale studies of extinction that also incorporate data from the recent p 
ghts into key patterns and processes of extinction and hence inform both early warning systems  
an population density, resource use and environmental impacts, and also on changing patterns of 
ollapse, regional extirpation or global extinction, previous studies have addressed holocene ma 
ctions of mammal species in response to human impacts. insights gained from comparative studies 
onmental shifts driven by anthropogenic impacts and future climate change. the proposed project 
ven by anthropogenic impacts and future climate change. the proposed project will combine data  
and drivers of mammal range decline and extinction in response to increasing anthropogenic thre 
ast mammal distributions and associated human impacts from the literature and from examination  
n patterns exist for range contraction, fragmentation and/or refugium formation. statistical in 
tigating whether critical thresholds of human impact, e.g. human population density, can be ide 
426 3 f a double interest in the study of the impacts of global change on ecosystems: on the one hand 
arch program, we propose to work on the impacts of climate change on the dynamics of vegetation 
m, we propose to work on the impacts of climate change on the dynamics of vegetation in the for 
12353 1 equirements, methods, data, results and impacts in order to make recommendations for monitoring 
7261 1 ation process in the mediterranean this invasive species complex. for this we will develop a ne 
15532 2 major environmental problems related to desertification. but the causes of woody vegetation dyn 
ern spain is particularly vulnerable to desertification. over the last decades, woody vegetatio 
15150 1  elucidate the role and interactions of fire, climate and human activities in the evolution of  
2081 1                                         climate change will be used as input data for the model 
14319 3 wever, human-induced changes, including climate change, can have significant effects on primary 
has undergone recent changes induced by alien species introduction and possibly climate change, 
alien species introduction and possibly climate change, which have affected the lakes biodivers 
11685 1 we will consider the highly novel, high risk, but very low cost option of using a modular cubes 
11700 1 we will consider the highly novel, high risk, but very low cost option of using a modular cubes 
9894 1 we will consider the highly novel, high risk, but very low cost option of using a modular cubes 
15584 1 are complex and manifold. the resulting impacts on human societies and options for ecological m 
15351 1 rities to implement actuations to limit disease transmission.  
15568 2 across europe under the joint impact of climate change and human-induced shift in land use. one 
aneously in much of europe in the 1990s impacts on demographic parameters of predators that exp 
2018 8 el the mechanisms of plant responses to habitat fragmentation and environmental change. plant b 
osses are generally explained by either habitat fragmentation or environmental change. however, 
f the greatest challenges in explaining biodiversity loss is to assess, not only the individual 
ironmental factors. evidence shows that habitat fragmentation results in smaller populations wi 
creased genetic variation and increased risk of inbreeding. moreover, it was shown that inbreed 
 of the most important drivers of plant biodiversity loss. i will take these results forward by 
e nitrogen sensitive and suffering from habitat fragmentation, will be used as model species. i 
y knowledge for evaluating the relative impacts of environmental and genetic threats to biodive 
15530 3 mate changes, and associated effects on disturbance frequency and severity. understanding the r 
ystems, and identify critical points of degradation-agradation dynamics, as well as to investig 
tem functioning, that will also address fire resistance and resilience functions and carbon seq 
12040 1 liable early warning systems for marine invasive species.  
7182 4 er eradication of witch - claws lies in soil erosion phenomena that occur when the slope is ste 
 can therefore be a cure worse than the disease, if ecological healing operations using native  
nducted in parallel. in the case of the invasion of carpobrotus spp. in the mediterranean, taki 
insular perspective - suggests that the invasion of carpobrotus spp. is a complex and evolving  
10152 1 ty to shift distribution in response to climate change. exploring the relative importance of th 
11496 1 ty to shift distribution in response to climate change. exploring the relative importance of th 
13466 6 imate models there will be an increased risk of future forest fires in boreal forests. it is th 
tic effects occur during the first post-fire year, events in 2007 are of crucial importance for 
l importance for understanding the post-fire developments. fire focuses on the documentation of 
derstanding the post-fire developments. fire focuses on the documentation of baseline condition 
ve factors at different spatial scales. fire will be performed within burnt 100 ha sites each i 
ent unburnt forests as reference sites. fire will increase our understanding of the importance  
7635 10 i have the characteristic to accumulate heavy metals in large quantities in their vacuoles. the 
cts and quality of water. moreover, the"heavy metals"are among the most harmful and are not bio 
ns to rehabilitate soil contaminated by heavy metals. it consists in covering the soil with pla 
the soil with plant species tolerant to heavy metals, for immobilizing metal pollution using pl 
to heavy metals, for immobilizing metal pollution using plants hyperaccumulating heavy metals,  
ollution using plants hyperaccumulating heavy metals, can contain more than 1% of their dry mat 
 ecological engineering, to address the human impacts on the environment. it allows the rehabil 
mical recovery plant species containing heavy metals. this fundamental green chemistry program  
olerant plants and hyperaccumulators of"heavy metals"are a natural reservoir of transition meta 
gy from ores. it also has a significant environmental impact. ecochim engineering program aims  
14963 1 ing a maximum output power from glucose degradation, although this high power is at the expense 
10471 4           fuelled by concerns about the environmental impact of human activities, climate chang 
vironmental impact of human activities, climate change and its affect on the diversity, abundan 
ely investigating critical intervals of climate change, and will collaborate with the us funded 
. thirdly, i want to know whether rapid climate change today or at the petm is important in con 
10049 1  living systems, and for predicting the impacts of human activity on those systems, is to under 
2502 4      the rate and absolute magnitude of climate change in the last 150 years is expected to be  
are likely to be profoundly affected by climate change because human impacts have already under 
ndly affected by climate change because human impacts have already undermined their resilience  
increasing temperatures associated with global warming. the proposal will contribute toward a p 
10164 1 dict the impact and progression of this disease throughout european amphibian populations.  
11247 1 dict the impact and progression of this disease throughout european amphibian populations.  
9859 1                                         invasive species are a major threat to global biodivers 
11784 1 nge of invertebrates, most famously msx disease of oysters. the evolutionary relationships of b 
13480 5 . examples of such disturbances include climate change, overexploitation of natural resources,  
 overexploitation of natural resources, invasion of alien species and destruction and fragmenta 
ation of natural resources, invasion of alien species and destruction and fragmentation of natu 
on of alien species and destruction and fragmentation of natural habitats. the aims of the pres 
he structure and robustness of the post-disturbance communities. to accomplish this task we wil 
10638 1 uency of extreme events and presence of alien species, may change evolutionary pathways. the ty 
10722 3 a process which is often referred to as eutrophication. both base cation deficiency and eutroph 
cation. both base cation deficiency and eutrophication are known to be mechanisms involved in t 
tats, species and locations at greatest risk from n deposition. we will use a combination of la 
7632 8 l calculate crop areas with and without climate change. within an interdisciplinary group of la 
r the regulation of changes produced by climate change on crop areas. the idea is to imagine in 
 a changing world. habitat destruction, invasive species and climate change are the most import 
bitat destruction, invasive species and climate change are the most important threats to the bi 
y of ecosystem services. in particular, global warming is affecting forest ecosystems at multip 
th the speed of the current warming and fragmentation of the landscape, plants can not migrate  
them. today it is essential to know the vulnerability of forests to these changes for forest ma 
eir environmental aspirations face this climate change. it is essential to choose, design and i 
13721 1 r some circumstances lead to population extinction. genetic variability in adaptive traits, the 
7700 2 ing into account interest ambivalence - risk and the definition of partial indicators for diffe 
ing into account interest ambivalence - risk and the definition of partial indicators for diffe 
7717 1 cause of the threats of deforestation / degradation and / or significant mobilization costs of  
11071 2 ent aims to highlight the importance of climate change in relation to the ecology and viability 
e following issues: to what extent does global warming impact on the biology of particular spec 
2527 3      the rate and absolute magnitude of climate change in the last 150 years is expected to be  
are likely to be profoundly affected by climate change because human impacts have already under 
ndly affected by climate change because human impacts have already undermined their resilience  
14891 1      the direct and indirect effects of climate change are likely to affect the distribution of 
13929 4  system - willow leaf beetles and their natural enemies - with exceptionally good opportunities 
place every 3rd to 5th year, a relevant disturbance frequency when trying to quantify the role  
stant stands we will add low numbers of natural enemies, in the other half high numbers. equal  
tion dynamics of leaf beetles and their natural enemies in a number of willow stands, using dat 
15294 13 a high socio-economic value, but severe degradation produces physical, chemical and biotic chan 
 activity is one of the major causes of disturbance to the soil. discharges and wastes have a m 
ent and they are a continuous source of risk for heavy metal pollution to soil, air, surface wa 
ntinuous source of risk for heavy metal pollution to soil, air, surface water and groundwater.  
and metalloids, commonly referred to as heavy metals, are found in nature as part of pedogeneti 
ckground levels may represent a serious risk to human health and the environment, and the eu pr 
its content in soil in order to develop risk assessment systems. the risk caused to organisms i 
to develop risk assessment systems. the risk caused to organisms in the presence of metals depe 
tor to take into account when assessing risk is the reactivity of metal species with soil facto 
 in soil is the first step to determine risk level. however, chemical analysis alone is not ade 
 not provide a precise diagnosis of the risk of toxicity in soil, and the extrapolation of the  
ation of metals in soil and assess your risk, carries a high budget for soil analysis and requi 
 a system for evaluating the ecological risk caused by the dispersion of metal species from min 
15295 1 ecial protection in order to prevent it degradation and contamination due to toxic substances.  
14230 2 s increasingly clear that environmental degradation and scarcity play a key role in conflicts a 
 in the fields of environmental policy, environmental impact assessment, management and educati 
15108 1 cture-function of aquatic ecosystems to climate change.  
10062 10 s. we will collect data documenting the impacts of a past invasion on ecosystem patterns in thr 
 data documenting the impacts of a past invasion on ecosystem patterns in three landscapes. we  
ime. we will focus our attention on the invasion of scots pine into the western highlands of sc 
 8800 and 5800 years ago. prior to this invasion the forests of this region generally had mixed 
 the landscape pine invaded and how its invasion impacted upon ecosystem patterns and overall l 
t vegetation model to simulate the pine invasion. this model uses as inputs, amongst other thin 
c conditions during the period when the invasion took place. we will compare simulated changes  
s on the landscapes associated with the invasion with patterns reconstructed from the palaeoveg 
to simulate the consequences of such an invasion. this is important because such models provide 
l to simulate one such potential future invasion of a canopy dominant tree into these landscape 
7203 4 ngly challenged because of its negative impacts on the environment and on human health. moreove 
hogens they are vectors, but also their natural enemies is required. it is also appropriate to  
s, pathogens they are vectors and their natural enemies; this knowledge will help identify risk 
mies; this knowledge will help identify risk factors for the protection of plants and offer the 
14163 2                                         climate change is able to initate modifications in mari 
ne marine management baselines at which eutrophication level might impair critical functions of 
6739 3  the past. accidentally or deliberately introduced species, after successful colonization may b 
 from nurseries and greenhouses. global climate change can also facilitate dispersal and probab 
 also facilitate dispersal and probable invasion of exotics. these changes are fast on an evolu 
14124 5  grasslands has been to protect rare or endangered species that are characteristic to these com 
on and management experimental study of endangered species has been an inevitable part of activ 
lishment and further growth of selected endangered species will be studied in a series of field 
ocused on the aspects of the ecology of disturbance-related herbs. our working hypotheses are:  
play a major role in the recruitment of endangered species. the results of our research will be 
15033 6 with current trends of climatic change, invasive species are predicted to become more numerous  
ies in the future. as such the study of exotic species to predict their invasion potential and  
tudy of exotic species to predict their invasion potential and the impacts associated with them 
redict their invasion potential and the impacts associated with them has taken on a new urgency 
t it is debated if we can predict which exotic species may become invasive and if there are par 
 provide new insights to the ecology of biological invasions in general.  
2037 1 human health implications and ecosystem impacts. some of the ideas will be applied in a case st 
2203 5 icy instruments which generate explicit invasion targets at minimum costs, or, equivalently, fo 
on in social costs from aquatic species invasion. the ultimate purpose of this wp is thus to id 
he best management strategy for species risk management. this, in turn, requires three classes  
of this project: 1. assessing risks and impacts on ecosystem functioning from invading species. 
means of mitigating risks and ecosystem impacts and calculating their costs. an example is redu 
12513 1 ly-based understanding of the potential impacts of business and policy decisions on producers a 
14970 1  capacity of these species to cope with climate change. this main objective will be reached by  
14433 1 e may be applied for the development of drought-tolerant agricultural species.  
13870 1 asing occurrence of toxic algal blooms, eutrophication and the increasing level of uvb radiatio 
2208 1 nce of alternative states including the risk of catastrophic collapses. • develop methods for a 
2514 1 or present day climate and for a future climate change scenario. eco-harvest control rules for  
10720 2 iginal vegetation cover left. grassland degradation has important economic and environmental co 
in grassland ecosystems and any further degradation of this fragile ecological environment, wit 
15482 3 f its potential to quantify and predict degradation stages. recent studies indicated that slow  
ion, facilitative interactions and soil degradation and how this, in turn, determines the spati 
lant interaction and soil nutrients and runoff connectivity over a climatic gradient under two  
11402 4 ces in semi-natural grasslands, and its vulnerability to changing management, can be explained  
microbial functional diversity, and its impacts on carbon and nitrogen turnover. vital aims to  
hange, including extreme changes. their impacts on ecosystem services will be modelled using bo 
ing ecosystem services delivery, and of impacts of management change. their feedbacks and perce 
481 2 nctional responses to management, their impacts on microbial functional diversity, and their co 
hange, including extreme changes. their impacts on ecosystem services will be modelled using bo 
10141 1  ecosystem services in response to high risk natural hazards and accelerated environmental chan 
11169 1  ecosystem services in response to high risk natural hazards and accelerated environmental chan 
7675 2 nder combined scenarios of land-use and climate change for the grenoble urban region in the fre 
rities, and downscaling of land-use and climate change projections. we will engage stakeholders 
12594 1 case study sites in different states of degradation and assess the information available on the 
7629 3 rban areas are characterized by extreme human impacts on the structure of habitats, biotic homo 
h as ecological engineering in 2010 pir fragmentation of habitats, biotic homogenization throug 
y native species or the introduction of exotic species reach extreme values ​​in urban areas. w 
15116 1  would be able to avoid or minimize the human impacts on ecosystems. it is expected to provide  
15117 1  would be able to avoid or minimize the human impacts on ecosystems. it is expected to provide  
13741 1 roject aims at assessing the effects of forest fragmentation on biodiversity with focus on bore 
14625 2                                         habitat fragmentation causes biodiversity loss, threate 
           habitat fragmentation causes biodiversity loss, threatening plant species persistenc 
11669 2 england, driven by the effects of smoke pollution on the relative visibility of the two morphs  
esses of selection and dispersal, whose impacts on genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium 
14434 1 vironment, studies on natural habitats’ fragmentation become more intensive. there are only few 
13806 3                                         climate change will lead to shifts in species distribut 
ation models. finally, we will identify extinction thresholds for a red-listed moss as a functi 
d turnover under different scenarios of climate change. predictions of future species distribut 
2068 1 shift in the pollinator fauna will have impacts on the plant species composition and diversity  
14814 2 ation aiming to mitigate the effects of climate change, and for land managers to establish appr 
 in europe and are highly vulnerable to climate change.  
14754 1 ysiology and the original habitat of an endangered species erica andevalensis cabezudo & rivera 
13818 2 c deposition has not been treated as an eutrophication process since p is generally regarded as 
 investigate if n-deposition has caused eutrophication of naturally n-limited lakes in southern 
13614 2 in order to minimize overestimations of extinction/colonisation rates, the project will focus o 
dicator of changing conditions than the extinction of a single species. thus, the project will  
2172 1 he forest-alpine transition zone due to global warming. since steep temperature-productivity gr 
416 2 otentially threatened by the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activity. indeed, l. d 
creasing under the effect of population fragmentation, no direct harvesting effect could be dis 
2002 1 tial growth, dead moss decomposability, drought resistance and length growth per unit mass incr 
15100 2 ring the next decades. these effects of climate change are likely to affect the functioning and 
eciduous oaks to analyze the effects of climate change on vegetative growth and acorn productio 
14920 2 nal response of peatlands ecosystems to global warming and, therefore, will reduce uncertainati 
, will reduce uncertainaties for future climate change predictions.  
15397 3 onents of the ecosystem are affected by climate change. in the present project, variation in li 
mediterranean ecosystems. 4. effects of climate change on demographic parameters of coexisting  
in wetlands and their implications in a climate change scenario.  
2080 5                                         climate change may have profound effects on insects tha 
ead tree mortality and have significant impacts on forest ecosystems. the spruce bark beetle .  
g of how climatic factors influence the risk of bark beetle outbreaks through tempo-spatial ana 
. the distribution of bivoltism and the risk of damages by the spruce bark beetle will be estim 
be estimated under various scenarios of climate change. the results will be made available for  
13855 4 f this project is to explore effects of biodiversity loss and eutrophication on local diversity 
xplore effects of biodiversity loss and eutrophication on local diversity processes, trophic in 
zer/predator presence. although coastal eutrophication changes both light and nutrient availabi 
, to detect possible cascade effects of eutrophication on ecosystem function and biodiversity.  
10814 11 is period will set the magnitude of the extinction wave that is presently building. what we do  
r lost worldwide largely as a result of climate change, overexploitation and pollution. we urge 
of climate change, overexploitation and pollution. we urgently need to understand the process o 
 need to understand the process of reef degradation in order to develop tools and strategy with 
 on the global front line of coral reef degradation. it is also the world centre of shallow wat 
hell trade. this will help us determine vulnerability to biodiversity loss, both of philippine  
will help us determine vulnerability to biodiversity loss, both of philippine reefs, and by ext 
 unpromising regions of the world where human impacts are severe. we are convinced there are af 
fordable and feasible solutions to reef degradation. it is the aim of this pilot project to gat 
 attention on the problem of coral reef degradation, the consequences of biodiversity loss for  
l reef degradation, the consequences of biodiversity loss for today s and future generations, a 
11682 1 pe variables, as well as the history of disturbance within a site.  
13441 5 at protecting the area from detrimental disturbance, it remains under threat due to seasonal bu 
ilience. it is crucial to ascertain how disturbance affects the structure and function of the e 
 strategies and to assess the potential environmental impacts of the delta´s principal conserva 
, seedling establishment in relation to fire regime and herbivore pressure. these data should i 
the independent and combined effects of fire and herbivory.  
423 2  the three last decades, in relation to climate change and effects of fishery. during the ninet 
d species are less sensitive to fishing impacts because of the gear selectivity and because the 
7140 4                                     the impacts of fishing and climate change on ecological pro 
             the impacts of fishing and climate change on ecological processes in maintaining e 
es of observed changes and identify the impacts on fisheries. The diversity in terms of spatial 
ding to the effects of fishing and / or climate change. changes in commercial fisheries of the  
14966 3 can experiment a growing variability in runoff as a result of the global change in rainfall int 
r extension of periods with low flow or drought and the occurrence of flow intermittency and th 
 to the comprehension of the effects of climate change on mediterranean stream ecosystems.  
13967 4 his project will investigate effects of fragmentation and invasion on pollination service to fo 
nvestigate effects of fragmentation and invasion on pollination service to forbs in marginal gr 
creased visitation rates with increased fragmentation or invasion status. the effects of pollen 
n rates with increased fragmentation or invasion status. the effects of pollen limitation on ma 
14469 3                                         habitat fragmentation, that is the reduction of a conti 
iversity of terrestrial ecosystems. the fragmentation of habitats and the resulting isolation o 
cies; to identify spatial thresholds of fragmentation that are necessary to maintain genetic di 
13849 5                                         habitat fragmentation caused by dams and road passes ca 
level. to increase our understanding of fragmentation effects we will quantify extinction and c 
 fragmentation effects we will quantify extinction and colonization rates. extinction rates as  
tify extinction and colonization rates. extinction rates as a function of habitat size will be  
 that can be used to predict effects of fragmentation and introductions we will use data on the 
7125 2 ntext, essential to tackle the issue of climate change impacts on biodiversity and functioning  
l to tackle the issue of climate change impacts on biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecos 
540 2 ing forces. understanding the impact of climate change on these ecosystems, the management of t 
the north sea . on the other hand, both climate change and the improvement of trophic status in 
15245 4 by land use change is a major driver of biodiversity loss, but little is known about the effect 
s of spatial and temporal components of habitat loss, fragmentation and restoration on plant an 
nd temporal components of habitat loss, fragmentation and restoration on plant and pollinator c 
hip often provides a partial picture of biodiversity loss because not all species are equally a 
13953 5 project aims to estimate the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on biodiversity of macro 
stimate the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on biodiversity of macrofauna using musse 
na using mussel beds as a model system. habitat loss is a main cause for species extinctions an 
ctions and biodiversity declines, while habitat fragmentation model data and results obtained t 
versity, and the relative importance of habitat fragmentation and different population processe 
12177 3 ervation, stock management, shelter and erosion control. the hedgerow network may also play an  
important future role in adaptation for climate change by facilitating the movement of species  
her research. it is recognised that the impacts of management regimes are likely to take many y 
11066 2 elow which the parasite cannot persist. extinction of a parasite in one host population may onl 
erest, because it could explain why the risk of becoming infected varies between different plac 
14741 1 cal status and to minimize the negative impacts.  
11547 1 ity of natural populations to cope with disease, presenting important implications for the cons 
13944 3 mon but often overlooked consequence of biological invasions, on patterns and processes at the  
tem that has received a large influx of exotic species. the relative importance of local and re 
sights in the long-term consequences of biological invasions on biodiversity and ecosystem func 
14718 3 d as one of the most affected by global climate change. in the particular case of spain, it cou 
 and simulated models on the effects of climate change on species distribution and abundance. s 
enarios of simultaneously landscape and climate change on habitat suitability for the studied s 
14833 7  present the evidence of the effects of climate change on calluna heath is very limited. howeve 
however, an increase in temperature and drought are likely to affect their distribution and com 
 ones. likewise, the increase in summer drought produces an increased risk of fire with possibl 
in summer drought produces an increased risk of fire with possible alterations in heathland beh 
r drought produces an increased risk of fire with possible alterations in heathland behaviour,  
ed project is to analyse the effects of climate change, land use and forest fires on biodiversi 
ed, and on a large scale as a result of climate change, which can displace current conditions t 
14832 7  present the evidence of the effects of climate change on calluna heath is very limited. howeve 
however, an increase in temperature and drought are likely to affect their distribution and com 
 ones. likewise, the increase in summer drought produces an increased risk of fire with possibl 
in summer drought produces an increased risk of fire with possible alterations in heathland beh 
r drought produces an increased risk of fire with possible alterations in heathland behaviour,  
ed project is to analyse the effects of climate change, land use and forest fires on biodiversi 
ed, and on a large scale as a result of climate change, which can displace current conditions t 
15218 1 yfish constitutes a textbook example of biological invasion and has expanded over the doñana na 
2515 1 le negative consequences of near future ocean acidification scenarios on the copepod calanus fi 
14184 2     recognizing the increasing chemical pollution of the environment, more agricultural farms a 
ut still may result in partial or total extinction of the population later. experiments with th 
13739 2 ramatic reduction in biodiversity and a degradation of ecosystem functioning. here, we intend t 
n hypothesis is that relative predation risk differs between habitats seasonally and during win 
1088 3 ter quality, decomposers, soil factors, pollution and global warming, but the role of biodivers 
ecomposers, soil factors, pollution and global warming, but the role of biodiversity remains ef 
aluation and discussion on the possible impacts of biodiversity changes on ecosystem processes  
15446 5 proliferate studies within the scope of climate change. we will be able to discern changes in e 
hanges in ecosystem processes caused by climate change from those of natural variability if we  
 a national action on adaptation to the climate change is enough to understand that it is very  
of temperature on earth. the effects of climate change on ecosystems, the headwater streams inc 
n stream ecosystems under the projected climate change scenarios.  
15517 4                                  global climate change is one of the principal threats to the c 
otentially important in quantifying the impacts of climate change, since it could lead to consi 
important in quantifying the impacts of climate change, since it could lead to considerable und 
e and phenology compared with estimated impacts based on the assumption that species show homog 
14790 1 species communities, if it is favouring exotic species or endangering native species, and if th 
15099 3 also expected a greater duration of the drought period which could counteract the first effect  
gh the induction of different levels of drought intensity. the specific projects of this propos 
proposal are: to analyse the effects of climate change on the dynamics of growth and acorn prod 
14636 1 etermine the ecological consequences of invasion by s. muticum. in addition, we will determine  
11393 1 ects of moorland patch burning on basin runoff quantity and quality, through examination of riv 
12045 2 t diseases through modeling for linking climate change, forest density and disease levels . sta 
king climate change, forest density and disease levels . statistical analysis were performed us 
10734 2   as organisms that can cause death and disease in their hosts, parasites are forms of life tha 
 environments we can understand whether climate change or human movement by trade or travel has 
13762 1 nown of these diseases is the dutch elm disease new knowledge about the resistance mechanisms o 
14655 1 or detecting and assessing the level of pollution in freshwater ecosystems. in order to achieve 
10661 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
10912 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11158 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11170 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11420 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11421 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11701 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
11702 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, and the potential to replace imported s 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
9896 2  benefits to the environment, including climate change, the potential to replace imported sourc 
es will have both negative and positive impacts on these services. positive aspects may include 
12478 1 ty to identify and deal with cumulative impacts and trade-offs. adoption and implementation of  
14839 3 ses of plants to high concentrations of heavy metals by using bioactive compounds. assays will  
rder to improve their behaviour against heavy metals. secondly, endemic plant species formerly  
ethodologies useful for preservation of endangered species and for phytoremediation programmes. 
462 3  show the recent epidemics of arbovirus disease that have touched them. little recent informati 
recent events of epidemics of arbovirus disease have affected human populations. we will analyz 
 - following the results, draw up human risk maps in relation to habitats  
10677 2  and can be directly implicated in mass extinction. the geological history of this event, and r 
climate interactions as a cause of mass extinction and provide the first global perspective of  
14922 1 onents of the ecosystem are affected by climate change. in the present project, variations in l 
15417 1 mporal changes. modelling the potential impacts that these changes would have on available wate 
7701 2 induced effects. especially in light of climate change, the contribution of livestock activitie 
vestock activities in the production of greenhouse gases is widely highlighted. a wide variety  
14587 1                          a quantitative risk assessment based only on exposure and toxicity is  
14971 2  comparing the effects of the light and drought, both under two levels, about the response of t 
identify a putative local adaptation to drought, and a higher thermotolerance, from the populat 
7306 3 l carbon stocks is likely to accelerate global warming. - evaluate, using the model, the impact 
he ability of a agrosystem to limit air pollution, and groundwater. the aim is to assess how th 
libration of the model - predicting the impacts of different farming systems on the operation o 
14150 1 cial interest in the context of ongoing global warming.  
12184 1 . this study will consider whether some climate change mitigation methods would be more suited  
11593 3 ral and anthropogenic stressors such as global warming and ocean acidification might result in  
ic stressors such as global warming and ocean acidification might result in a dramatic loss of  
ion of existing genes. however, current climate change happens over an unprecedented short peri 
7221 1 ods. - according to the results, sketch risk maps for humans based on habitats  
11643 2 nder debate. a reduction in atmospheric greenhouse gases is one possibility; another , might ha 
utstanding questions about this ancient climate change event.  
7017 5 sity is regulated, and how biodiversity impacts ecosystem functioning, is still unclear. this i 
lear that the linked population patches disturbance experiments will use as the disturbance the 
disturbance experiments will use as the disturbance the replacement of entire basins with in a  
zation. both the scale and frequency of disturbance will be experimentally manipulated. the exp 
nding of how competition, predation and disturbance influence diversity and biomass when the en 
15228 1    infectious keratoconjunctivitis is a disease affecting domestic and wild ruminants, mainly c 
10813 7 first cases of a new form of infectious disease - a kind of pox - were reported from common bir 
wise very little is known about how the disease is transmitted and what effects it has on birds 
t high frequency. in may 2010, this new disease appeared in a long-term study population of the 
 rare to study the emergence of a novel disease from the first cases, and this research aims bo 
s both to understand the effect of this disease on birds, but also to study the factors determi 
lect further data on the spread of this disease in 2011. infectious diseases can represent seri 
both to assess the threat that this new disease poses to common uk garden birds, as well as to  
12536 3 bination of more favourable climate and introduced species and hybrids has lead to the establis 
ort . all these plants pose a very high risk to the integrity of uk aquatic ecosystems. the aim 
 method of control, without any adverse environmental impact.  
7157 3 ural constraints of the environment and human impacts. it is obviously the case of particularly 
 to be good indicators of environmental disturbance, but also a bacterial culture collection th 
rial biodiversity, such as point source pollution by hydrocarbons or pesticides  
13320 1  the main actions on a eu level to halt biodiversity loss. therefore it is a prerequisite to ev 
13321 1 odels for assessing and forecasting the impacts of climate and anthropogenic forcing on food-we 
13322 4 , under stress from land-use change and pollution, face additional pressures from climate chang 
llution, face additional pressures from climate change, directly and through interaction with o 
ese will take into account the probable impacts of future climate change and the need for a hol 
 account the probable impacts of future climate change and the need for a holistic approach to  
2517 2  agenda. nothing is known regarding the vulnerability and resilience of microbial communities a 
 traits in order to predict response to disturbance from community composition. the latter is o 
7011 1 antly, test theories from landscape and invasion ecology on microbial terrain.  
9878 3 yed under natura 2000. furthermore, the impacts of global climate change on beech forest ecosys 
000. furthermore, the impacts of global climate change on beech forest ecosystems are assessed. 
ts as well as to evaluate the impact of climate change on beech growth across its range. the ec 
12396 1 the evidence base for assessment of the eutrophication status in the uk. the infrastructure cre 
7456 3 overall goal of the european project on ocean acidification related to ocean acidification at s 
oject on ocean acidification related to ocean acidification at scales ranging from sub-cellular 
ibe the state change and the subsequent risk to the marine environment and earth system should  
7242 2 fish communities, such as fight against eutrophication, erosion of biodiversity, trivialization 
, such as fight against eutrophication, erosion of biodiversity, trivialization of communities  
13784 1  a simultaneous increased resistance to degradation by protozoa and human macrophages. if this  
10354 5                                    both climate change and tropical deforestation have regularl 
environments. however, we now know that human impacts on the environment, such as rising air te 
al forests, while in concert with other human impacts the implications are likely to be stagger 
ne is predicted to cause the sixth mass extinction in evolutionary history. recent research sho 
l to increase the rate and magnitude of climate change secondly, as tropical forests house more 
12220 3 development of policy by predicting the impacts of policy decisions on land-use and biodiversit 
diction, at the ecosystem level, of the impacts of changes in farming systems and land manageme 
re appropriate for predicting ecosystem impacts of changes to farming systems and land manageme 
10336 1 l for improved interpretation of global climate change effects on coral reefs e.g bleaching or  
12444 1 r understanding and take account of the impacts of environmental change on commercial fish stoc 
13768 4                                         habitat loss is a great threat to biodiversity. still m 
work remains to quantify the effects of fragmentation. the main aim of this post-doctoral proje 
 its response to different scenarios of climate change. t. opacus will be surveyed on hollow oa 
troductions, and different scenarios of climate change.  
13373 1  were lost due to severe winterkill and drought and 2525 of these material were identified by u 
14597 2 ns and technological improvement on the introduced species response. from that evaluation, simp 
a pilot demonstration project to combat desertification. the proposal focusses on mediterranean 
14586 1 ith the identification of biomarkers of pollution in areas with high biodiversity. the research 
13807 1  the models will be used to predict the extinction risks of lichens given different conservatio 
7415 1 n agro- ecosystems, causing significant erosion of all biodiversity compartments hosted by thes 
2537 1  and potentially has evolved as an anti invasion strategy rather than an elaborate and potentia 
15449 1 effects of predation and parasitization risk on the evolution of sexual signals, and the behavi 
7581 2  limit introgression between varieties. erosion of diversity"adaptive"could be at work in the s 
ms. the effective demonstration of this erosion is through the identification of molecular poly 
1103 1      the climatic change induced by the global warming is expected to modify the agricultural a 
13978 2                         with increasing habitat fragmentation and isolation, the cost for an in 
ntial of range expansion in response to climate change.  
7491 1                                     the invasion of new territories by new species is the subje 
14488 2 vel in several insectivorous birds in a climate change scenario in the mediterranean area. all  
on the effect of food availability in a climate change scenario. 4. determine the geographic an 
10178 3 etic correlations between melanism and: disease resistance. this approach to examining the adap 
y facilitate further examination of the disease resistance hypothesis for the evolution of mela 
us to examine the costs of melanism and disease resistance.  
11652 3 etic correlations between melanism and: disease resistance. this approach to examining the adap 
y facilitate further examination of the disease resistance hypothesis for the evolution of mela 
us to examine the costs of melanism and disease resistance.  
11072 3 environment is central to understanding disease and infectiousness, as well as providing a fram 
 in evolutionary biology and infectious disease research: how do reproductive parasites in the  
ontrol measures influence the spread of disease.  
10306 2 cause of the threat posed to species by climate change. species have evolved by natural selecti 
 causing a reduction in numbers or even extinction. natural selection is a phenomenon that acts 
433 2  evolution has important socio-economic impacts on cultivation methods. in this study, we perfo 
nvironmental data to assess the role of climate change in this case.  
14867 1 rstand these introgressive processes in invasive species and its putative role in speciation. e 
15476 2 tial in the assessment of the effect of climate change based on ecological niche modelling. a l 
, taking into account the speed at with global warming is happening.  
2064 1  have mainly focused on introduction of exotic species. however, introductions across smaller g 
15293 2  field populations subjected to chronic pollution. acclimation or adaptation to long exposures  
hose organisms adapted to metal chronic pollution that survive after being eventually subjected 
10470 2 nisms with large genomes are at greater risk of extinction, are less adaptable to living in pol 
th large genomes are at greater risk of extinction, are less adaptable to living in polluted so 
11415 2 nisms with large genomes are at greater risk of extinction, are less adaptable to living in pol 
th large genomes are at greater risk of extinction, are less adaptable to living in polluted so 
10472 2 ement of biodiversity in the context of climate change and human impacts.  
ty in the context of climate change and human impacts.  
13502 3                             the current global warming induces selection on natural populations 
 adapt, or if they will dwindle down to extinction. this is part of a more general question, na 
rtance for the prediction of effects of climate change.  
10388 1 veal not simply the immediate impact of ocean acidification but the potential consequences of t 
10273 5 al for species to evolve in response to climate change. the overall aim of this study is to und 
an be expected to evolve in response to climate change. the study is based on a classic example 
ample of the ecological consequences of climate change, namely the association between global w 
 change, namely the association between global warming and the earlier onset of breeding activi 
edicting the ecological consequences of climate change. the project also investigates factors t 
12069 1 es in species distributions mediated by climate change often rely on the assumption that specie 
13424 1 breeds so that they are at the brink of extinction. it is believed to be beneficial for country 
11258 4 us, it has been recognised that all the extinction events of the past 300 million years coincid 
dying a unique example of the volcanism-extinction link from 260 million years ago when lavas a 
 fossils and evidence of a catastrophic extinction. by studying these chinese rocks it will be  
o study directly both the volcanism and extinction story in the same place. the work will be su 
11391 4 us, it has been recognised that all the extinction events of the past 300 million years coincid 
dying a unique example of the volcanism-extinction link from 260 million years ago when lavas a 
 fossils and evidence of a catastrophic extinction. by studying these chinese rocks it will be  
o study directly both the volcanism and extinction story in the same place. the work will be su 
470 1 ion of some thermophilous elements, and invasive plants, the representation of which in the pre 
13766 2 , gene flow, species distributions, and invasion of exotic species, this research field is seve 
 species distributions, and invasion of exotic species, this research field is severely hampere 
11537 2 iths should be influenced by their post-fire location on the hydrological gradient. hypothesis  
cies distribution observed late in post-fire succession. the sensitivity of the model outputs t 
11363 1 ses and the viability of populations of endangered species. recent pilot analyses that we have  
15401 1 iation as a viable option to treat soil pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons . the fin 
10511 1 ypic and ecological consequence of soil pollution to be linked.  
10203 2 the geological past have been linked to global warming. global methane production in marine sed 
 as being a sensitive trigger for rapid climate change. surprisingly, we know relatively little 
10547 1 hreats facing marine biodiversity, from climate change to overfishing, occur over very large ar 
12196 3 nputs, improved soil structure, reduced soil erosion and run-off, enhanced pollinator services  
increased resilience of biodiversity to climate change impacts.  
ience of biodiversity to climate change impacts.  
7301 1 optera and can lead people goulotées in extinction vortex. . despite the importance of this sce 
14228 7 nthropogenic influence and accompanying degradation, area loss and fragmentation of natural hab 
accompanying degradation, area loss and fragmentation of natural habitats are considered to be  
lonize deteriorated habitats. thus, the extinction of habitat specialist species does not neces 
capacity and community resistance, both extinction and colonization can be delayed. extinction  
nction and colonization can be delayed. extinction debt and colonization credit can occur simul 
n historical species pools to study the extinction and colonization patterns in altered grassla 
se the derived diversity and propel the extinction of original species. we will study the effec 
11384 15 tifying populations with high threat of extinction is important for deciding how we target cons 
redicting the ecosystem consequences of species loss. the majority of what is known about mecha 
ty of what is known about mechanisms of extinction focuses on species in isolation. for example 
arger bodied species can suffer greater extinction risk, due to lower reproductive rates slowin 
d species can suffer greater extinction risk, due to lower reproductive rates slowing recovery, 
bout what types of species are prone to extinction, and the underpinning ecological theory, has 
ation schemes and predictors of species extinction risk, such as those used in the iucn red lis 
es and predictors of species extinction risk, such as those used in the iucn red list of threat 
s. many of these predictors reflect the vulnerability of individual species to effects of envir 
o effects of environmental change. such impacts can be direct: for example a small population i 
e a small population is more is at high risk of extinction through direct effects of environmen 
l population is more is at high risk of extinction through direct effects of environmental vari 
y role in developing classifications of risk that are used by international agencies such as th 
bd. their evidence based development of risk classification systems has previously involved ref 
inform us about the utility of existing risk classifications and how they may be improved.  
14634 2 ow them to survive in such systems. the invasion of dune ecosystems by exotic species and their 
ems. the invasion of dune ecosystems by exotic species and their incorporation to the current e 
14589 2 es some degree of management including: fragmentation of populations, extreme deviations of sex 
 vulnerable category due to the serious risk of genetic alteration despite its numerical abunda 
13597 2 bacterial communities and the effect of disturbance intensity and frequency on bacterial commun 
lience of bacterial communities after a disturbance event.  
14746 2                            biodiversity degradation is one of the most important anthropogenic  
ish community is not an exception. land erosion has modified fish habitats and threatens specie 
10294 1 e is currently 1.8 ppm and about 20% of global warming has been attributed to this potent green 
11660 4 ther in order to determine the rates of degradation and the processes of diagenesis. this proje 
 to solve the reasons behind this rapid degradation. the combination of the right team of exper 
he reasons for and processes behind the degradation. the study will provide a unique opportunit 
rmed decision about the rapidity of the degradation of the site and therefore recommended mitig 
12511 2 h. for example when measuring potential impacts of heavy metals and pesticides on the soil biot 
ple when measuring potential impacts of heavy metals and pesticides on the soil biota. however, 
12600 2 r air. construction work results in the disturbance of large volumes of soil resources annually 
ity of the vegetated areas but can have impacts off-site such as on flooding, aquifer recharge  
10657 1 tive to regional and potentially global climate change, the bering sea is one of the source reg 
11491 1 e is clearly increasing. whereas global sea level rise during the previous century was ~1.8 mm/ 
2184 3 s for forecasting ecological effects of climate change, ii climate change scenarios for case st 
cological effects of climate change, ii climate change scenarios for case study systems and iii 
 will promote recruitment to ecological climate change forecasting by including a phd position  
13971 2 collapses coincided with the mnemiopsis invasion. ecosystem effects depend on complex food web  
ght environment changes, for ex. due to eutrophication. effects on fish by contemporary changes 
13769 3                     the introduction of exotic species is considered a major threat to global b 
 to global biodiversity and the ongoing climate change could alter species distributions. this  
ms to assess feeding characteristics of invasive species and to find out if species with wide f 
15042 1 nt of these environments, threatened by desertification processes.  
12221 1 ling for the abundance and diversity of weeds and invertebrates using fse-standard methods. the 
10529 1 ion of du from real contaminated soils. impacts of plant growth on du distribution and chemical 
15505 4 genetic structure of plant communities. fire also stamps a genetic fingerprint on primary produ 
s proposal it is intended to survey the fire-induced shifts in the soil microbial genomes, biog 
ecular basis of adaptation to recurrent fire is essential for revealing evolutionary and ecolog 
g can be altered through the increasing wildfire frequency caused by temperature rise.  
13757 23                                         fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and 
                      fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and grassland ecosyst 
 origin and maintenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean  
intenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean and boreal bio 
th mediterranean and boreal biomes that impacts the biodiversity of ecosystems, species and gen 
systems, species and genetic structure. fire-ecosystem relationships are altered by changing cl 
y changing climate and earlier european fire regimes are now heavily modified by human activiti 
omic problems. intense or inappropriate fire can wreak enormous damage and following recent ext 
ous damage and following recent extreme fire years in parts of europe, there is an urgent need  
d for a co-ordinated european policy on fire management. the main aim of fireman is to generate 
gement tools for the appropriate use of fire to foster biodiversity in three major european eco 
opean ecosystems. fireman will focus on fire-biodiversity-society relationships in engage with  
l evaluate societal preferences towards fire and biodiversity management and develop economic m 
tcomes will be characterised ‘base-line fire regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodive 
e regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodiversity-climate relationships that are used t 
ts of reactions of local communities to fire and biodiversity management. these tools will be d 
elp with the european target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. the european environmental a 
rds the 2010 goal and reported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several  
ported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several types of forest in europ 
m a biodiversity perspective, effective fire suppression may threaten species that depend on ha 
ecies that depend on habitats formed by fire, which is the case in the boreal and the mediterra 
ion of an integrated approach to forest fire management is crucial, and starts with landscape a 
s advice with an integrated approach to fire management through modelling and a focus on landsc 
9881 22                                         fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and 
                      fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and grassland ecosyst 
 origin and maintenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean  
intenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean and boreal bio 
th mediterranean and boreal biomes that impacts the biodiversity of ecosystems, species and gen 
systems, species and genetic structure. fire-ecosystem relationships are altered by changing cl 
y changing climate and earlier european fire regimes are now heavily modified by human activiti 
omic problems. intense or inappropriate fire can wreak enormous damage and following recent ext 
ous damage and following recent extreme fire years in parts of europe, there is an urgent need  
d for a co-ordinated european policy on fire management. the main aim of fireman is to generate 
gement tools for the appropriate use of fire to foster biodiversity in three major european eco 
opean ecosystems. fireman will focus on fire-biodiversity-society relationships in engage with  
utcomes will be characterised base-line fire regimes and local and regional models of fire-biod 
egimes and local and regional models of fire-biodiversity-climate relationships that are used t 
ts of reactions of local communities to fire and biodiversity management. fireman will help wit 
elp with the european target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. the european environmental a 
european environmental agency reported: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several  
gency reported: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several types of forest in europ 
m a biodiversity perspective, effective fire suppression may threaten species that depend on ha 
ecies that depend on habitats formed by fire, which is the case in the boreal and the mediterra 
ion of an integrated approach to forest fire management is crucial, and starts with landscape a 
s advice with an integrated approach to fire management through modelling and a focus on landsc 
473 20                                         fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and 
                      fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and grassland ecosyst 
 origin and maintenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean  
intenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean and boreal bio 
th mediterranean and boreal biomes that impacts the biodiversity of ecosystems, species and gen 
systems, species and genetic structure. fire-ecosystem relationships are altered by changing cl 
y changing climate and earlier european fire regimes are now heavily modified by human activiti 
omic problems. intense or inappropriate fire can wreak enormous damage and following recent ext 
ous damage and following recent extreme fire years in parts of europe, there is an urgent need  
d for a co-ordinated european policy on fire management. the main aim of fireman is to generate 
gement tools for the appropriate use of fire to foster biodiversity in three major european eco 
opean ecosystems. fireman will focus on fire-biodiversity-society relationships in engage with  
l evaluate societal preferences towards fire and biodiversity management and develop economic m 
tcomes will be characterised ‘base-line fire regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodive 
e regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodiversity-climate relationships that are used t 
ts of reactions of local communities to fire and biodiversity management. these tools will be d 
elp with the european target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. the european environmental a 
rds the 2010 goal and reported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several  
ported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several types of forest in europ 
m a biodiversity perspective, effective fire suppression may threaten spe  
15569 23                                         fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and 
                      fire is a natural disturbance agency of many forest and grassland ecosyst 
 origin and maintenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean  
intenance to burning, and fire is a key disturbance agency in both mediterranean and boreal bio 
th mediterranean and boreal biomes that impacts the biodiversity of ecosystems, species and gen 
systems, species and genetic structure. fire-ecosystem relationships are altered by changing cl 
y changing climate and earlier european fire regimes are now heavily modified by human activiti 
omic problems. intense or inappropriate fire can wreak enormous damage and following recent ext 
ous damage and following recent extreme fire years in parts of europe, there is an urgent need  
d for a co-ordinated european policy on fire management. the main aim of fireman is to generate 
gement tools for the appropriate use of fire to foster biodiversity in three major european eco 
opean ecosystems. fireman will focus on fire-biodiversity-society relationships in engage with  
l evaluate societal preferences towards fire and biodiversity management and develop economic m 
tcomes will be characterised ‘base-line fire regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodive 
e regimes, local and regional models of fire-biodiversity-climate relationships that are used t 
ts of reactions of local communities to fire and biodiversity management. these tools will be d 
elp with the european target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. the european environmental a 
rds the 2010 goal and reported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several  
ported in 2006: fire is a major natural disturbance factor for several types of forest in europ 
m a biodiversity perspective, effective fire suppression may threaten species that depend on ha 
ecies that depend on habitats formed by fire, which is the case in the boreal and the mediterra 
ion of an integrated approach to forest fire management is crucial, and starts with landscape a 
s advice with an integrated approach to fire management through modelling and a focus on landsc 
2209 1 and impact of human activities, and for risk analysis. adaptive management of natural resources 
2201 4                                    in a risk analysis of ecosystem effects of introduced exotic 
eriences and data both from releases of exotic species in sweden as well as doing comparative a 
g aquaculture mediated introductions of alien species and to build a conceptual model regarding 
 ecosystem function in some areas where alien species have established will be described and an 
2200 3                   1. identify phases of invasion , and characterize species, habitats and fish  
e baltic sea. 2. analyze the effects of disturbance on susceptibility to non-indigenous fishes  
 - assessing the effects of fishery and eutrophication on the susceptibility for non-indigenous 
11677 1 al other factors low oxygen and chronic pollution can cause the sudden mortality of a species a 
15585 2 r more suitable habitats after a pulsed disturbance. thus, the connectivity of the system large 
ve effects on biodiversity by hindering invasive species dispersal and providing refuges in iso 
12066 3           the world is entering a major extinction crisis, the so called sixth extinction and t 
 extinction crisis, the so called sixth extinction and this is particularly true for freshwater 
likely to lead to different patterns of vulnerability.  
222 3 ial changes in ecosystems accompany the habitat loss – fragmentation, increase in isolation and 
ecosystems accompany the habitat loss – fragmentation, increase in isolation and increase in ed 
calists and generalists. we assume that habitat loss will have more negative impact to habitat  
14794 1 dentify suitable biomarkers of fluoride pollution in inland aquatic ecosystems.  
11269 1 or challenges from socio-ecological and climate change.  
11416 1 or challenges from socio-ecological and climate change.  
11501 4                          predicting the impacts of global change on rural communities at local  
he social sciences, economics, ecology, risk management, spatial planning, climate change and c 
ogy, risk management, spatial planning, climate change and complexity sciences to design and in 
the link between ecosystem services and impacts on nutritional and socio-economic status and ma 
13371 2 nserve forage crop species in danger of erosion and extinction thus to serve this material to r 
e crop species in danger of erosion and extinction thus to serve this material to researchers a 
210 1 use of the need to reverse the damaging impacts of modern agricultural practice on biodiversity 
2106 1 l foraging areas in order to assess the impacts of bearded seal feeding on the benthic communit 
11877 2                    our vision: to impel climate change mitigation action by motivating private  
ng, modelling and quantification of the risk of forest carbon loss, and investor s confidence i 
7145 1 lative incidence of ancient customs and climate change on the biodiversity of the tree layer. * 
14504 11              on august 2003, a woodland fire affected several headwater mediterranean streams i 
a. in this project we want to study the fire effects on the aquatic biota and its recovery proc 
 while mediterranean rivers reaction to fire is still unknown, although their higher exposure t 
nown, although their higher exposure to fire events. headwaters are key areas for freshwater bi 
 its isolation as consequence of stream fragmentation due to downstream pollution. so we consid 
 stream fragmentation due to downstream pollution. so we consider very important to define the  
very important to define the effects of fire disturbance in small headwater streams and its res 
important to define the effects of fire disturbance in small headwater streams and its resilien 
of having already information about pre-fire communities in some of the proposed areas; in some 
allow us to establish the reference pre-fire conditions and to recognize when the total recover 
 pretend to analyse and follow the post-fire evolution of general physicochemical parameters .  
14972 3  been fragmented along the world due to human impact. the lost of forests might be great conseq 
al is to evaluate the effect of forests fragmentation on the biodiversity along a stress gradie 
to evaluate the effect of beech forests fragmentation on epiphytic lichen communities along a s 
7710 1 f the population, especially in case of invasion by china truffle. an important knowledge trans 
15404 6                                         habitat loss and fragmentation are thought to be major  
                       habitat loss and fragmentation are thought to be major drivers of the on 
biodiversity crisis. a central tenet of fragmentation theory, the extinction threshold hypothes 
tral tenet of fragmentation theory, the extinction threshold hypothesis, states that fragmentai 
t fragmentaion agravates the effects of habitat loss, making more habitat necessary to avoid ex 
 research have the potential to benefit fragmentation theory, to improve numerical techniques t 
10009 1 eas uninformed management has increased erosion and flooding, and degraded the water quality an 
12038 12 ne of the best known taxa, namely fish, habitat loss, flow modification, industrial pollution,  
tat loss, flow modification, industrial pollution, eutrophication and introduction of non-nativ 
low modification, industrial pollution, eutrophication and introduction of non-native species a 
est diversity threats worldwide. global climate change may further regionally amplify habitat l 
e change may further regionally amplify habitat loss through chronic reduction in water availab 
r built and used an empirically derived extinction-area curve to project future rates of freshw 
project future rates of freshwater fish extinction following variations in river drainage area  
ver drainage area resulting from global climate change. we predict that only few, and narrowly  
should suffer an increase in population extinction rates from drainage area loss by 2090. moreo 
m drainage area loss by 2090. moreover, habitat loss in these drainage basins will hasten natur 
ese drainage basins will hasten natural extinction rates by only 1.47 times. this result strong 
ce to counteract actual and future fish species loss by preferentially focusing conservation ac 
1972 2 ferent effects on phytophages and their natural enemies. here we propose to analyse the molecul 
. additionally, we will analyse how the natural enemies of the aphids are affected by the diffe 
2539 1 xamine the effects of anthropogenic and climate change. the life histories of african lepidochr 
10773 1 timates and variations in anthropogenic risk. this software will also lend itself well to publi 
2195 5 f the key fucus species and natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes. processes generating 
l and the correlations observed between disturbance patterns of fucus and different natural and 
is structure will change with different disturbance scenarios. • to evaluate whether the declin 
he key stone species fucus, natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes and species and funct 
d predict relationships between natural disturbance and biodiversity of fucus biotopes. • to te 
10263 3 pparent in the last decade due to rapid global warming. the possible implications of a gradual  
uenced by a reduction of sea ice due to global warming. despite the significance of polar sea i 
 ice but also the predicted outcomes of global warming in polar oceans because ice free waters  
7641 1 ed environments by methods little or no disturbance of local ecosystems is a challenge today. a 
15474 1 with the highest adaptive value against climate change. such approach must be complemented with 
2009 2 ional plant traits related to shade and drought tolerance. the association of co-evolved plant  
al forest conservation, management, and climate change mitigation efforts. the classification o 
11329 4 erns of biodiversity and predicting the impacts of climate change. in this application, we prop 
diversity and predicting the impacts of climate change. in this application, we propose to inve 
ructure in response to past episodes of climate change, the turnover of grass species compositi 
cological adaptation to temperature and drought, and evolutionary history may each play an equa 
7020 2 ed to continue over the coming decades. human impacts on biodiversity take place against a back 
research recognises the consequences of biodiversity loss for the services and goods ecosystems 
15251 1                                  global climate change is perhaps the most pervasive threat for 
169 1 species which react in a similar way to disturbance and the role of functional traits in specie 
13738 2 rine sediments, i.e. mineralisation and nitrification-denitrification rates, are positively cor 
ities will be used and their ecological impacts on the biogeochemical processes analysed. for e 
14573 1 ication of the phenotypic plasticity of invasive species. the work plan of objective 1 includes 
1953 1 dynamics that affect the probability of invasion of a new trait or preference mutant.  
12034 2 osphorus from soil organic matter under drought conditions. il also appears that the contributi 
ibution of ectomycorrhizal fungi to the degradation of forest litters have to date been underes 
10832 2  c. arvense is one of the world s worst weeds and all attempts to use insects or pathogenic fun 
tect the plant against insects, then in weeds, we can start to manipulate fungal occurrence, so 
10187 1  be used in biological control of plant disease.  
12684 1                     •annual updates and climate change on butterfly populations  
13558 1 funds for this position, and there is a risk that the position will be retracted. because biodi 
7437 1 project aims to assess the magnitude of habitat fragmentation at two plant species restricted t 
11240 1 ion in the extent of the sea ice due to global warming. in view of the importance of the specie 
11497 1 ion in the extent of the sea ice due to global warming. in view of the importance of the specie 
15305 4                                      as invasive species spread through a new environment they  
latitude a few years after the american invasion supplied strong evidence that environmental la 
sting a directional response to current climate change. yet, the generality of seasonal changes 
 been employed to monitor the impact of climate change on the genetic constitution of populatio 
14652 1 nsequence of habitat destruction, water pollution, climatic change, and emerging infectious dis 
14541 3 opulations of three vegetal endemic and endangered species from the canary islands: myrica riva 
luate the genetic causes and factors of erosion in the natural population, as well as estimate  
of the natural populations of the three endangered species analysed.  
15025 1 uence becomes more evident. the current climate change proceeds inexorably and its negative inf 
11015 1 y act to help one another, they run the risk of disruptive cheaters that do not pay their fair  
9991 1 y act to help one another, they run the risk of disruptive cheaters that do not pay their fair  
10131 1 tween the origin of new species and the extinction of existing ones determines the current leve 
11417 1 tween the origin of new species and the extinction of existing ones determines the current leve 
14781 3                                         invasion by non-native species is second only to habita 
by non-native species is second only to habitat loss as a threat to global biodiversity. the br 
l in the establishment and expansion of invasive species.  
7166 2  What is the phylogenetic origin of the invasion c. raciborskii in France * what are the adapta 
nditions * what is the extension of the invasion of France and what types of water bodies are v 
2111 2 ld be of importance also for regulatory risk assessment. the replacement of traditional fish fe 
the present framework for governance of risk of ge in aquaculture. this project extends and bro 
15462 1 s, reduced census number and population fragmentation have important genetic consequences that  
6904 6 stations, severity and prognosis of the disease. consequently, lupus may appear in different cl 
forms. sle, the term for this colourful disease, collects heterogeneous subgroups. our knowledg 
n of immune system, are associated with disease susceptibility or with particular organ involve 
ents, such as those with severe or mild disease, those with and without kidney involvement and  
 and also those with active or inactive disease. we use two methods: 1./ analysis of different  
fferent subgroups of this heterogeneous disease. genetic pattern can be used in the future foll 
14653 2 d to genes associated to cardiovascular risk, and check the specific role of the diversity foun 
ity found in the susceptibility to that disease from a genetic association  
15183 1              freshwater colonization by invasive species has huge ecologic and economic consequ 
14870 1                          populations of endangered species have to be often maintained in capti 
14869 1                          populations of endangered species have to be often maintained in capti 
10948 1            the earth currently faces an extinction crisis unprecedented in its history. identif 
6806 1 th respect to the pathomechanism of the disease and the penetrance of the mutations. - the read 
10838 2            the response of organisms to climate change may be limited by evolution at the range 
ion structure during rapid responses to climate change.  
6743 1 y contribute to effective protection of endangered species.  
13847 1  relation to the biotic environment and climate change.  
13871 4 ill focus on the detrimental effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation that tend to erode  
, small population size, inbreeding and extinction risk. the ultimate goal of the research is t 
ulation size, inbreeding and extinction risk. the ultimate goal of the research is to study asp 
 of the research is to study aspects of habitat fragmentation and its role for loss of genetic  
15255 2 ersion polymorphism started well before global warming became an issue of major concern, but th 
 of populations is responding to recent climate change. as numerous loci are located within dro 
14547 3                                         habitat fragmentation is one of the most ubiquitous and 
 the genetic and demographic effects of habitat fragmentation, and the implications for populat 
vestigate the genetic effects caused by fragmentation of steppe habitats using as models the le 
10578 1 butes to the biobanking of samples from endangered species and to the reduction of the number o 
11046 1 ssfully in situ to the expected rate of climate change.  
11287 1 ssfully in situ to the expected rate of climate change.  
11243 2              scientists are certain the global warming is occurring at an alarming rate, but we 
as well as helping us to understand how global warming will affect rare species.  
11060 1 ually applicable to, for example, human disease genes showing advantageous variants in a popula 
9869 4 rm reasonable predictions of the likely impacts of environmental change on tree species, then w 
cant, and demographic processes such as extinction and recolonisation may confound local adapta 
duction quality, particularly under the climate change scenarios currently affecting adaptive o 
he project promises high impact for low risk and with significant potential for downstream rese 
10286 2 edback on global climate. or will rapid climate change trigger a shift to peatland types that a 
n store will fare in the face of future climate change.  
10539 2 edback on global climate. or will rapid climate change trigger a shift to peatland types that a 
n store will fare in the face of future climate change.  
11043 2 edback on global climate. or will rapid climate change trigger a shift to peatland types that a 
n store will fare in the face of future climate change.  
15498 3 egion is the mediterranean heathland, a fire-prone shrubland community type associated to nutri 
ill contribute to ascertain the role of fire as an intrinsic element of the mediterranean heath 
project will unveil an intrinsic higher vulnerability of the mediterranean heathland in the sca 
14969 1 ll be used as indicators of response to climate change. response to climatic variation, mostly  
10154 1  lifeforms and detailed records of past climate change. examination of these contents requires  
10423 1  lifeforms and detailed records of past climate change. examination of these contents requires  
11773 1  lifeforms and detailed records of past climate change. examination of these contents requires  
10666 1 ing industry will be less vulnerable to climate change than we have feared. in which case, kril 
10668 1 ing industry will be less vulnerable to climate change than we have feared. in which case, kril 
10983 1 ing industry will be less vulnerable to climate change than we have feared. in which case, kril 
11016 1 ing industry will be less vulnerable to climate change than we have feared. in which case, kril 
12043 2 om overfishing, with direct or indirect impacts on the marine ecosystems in the southern ocean, 
ion and dispersion patterns for several endangered species. glides had important scientific imp 
10644 3 ause they assess the scope for managing climate change on reefs throughout the world. those reg 
gement to address the problem of global climate change. as such, we anticipate a broad impact u 
e science of sustainable management and climate change.  
10424 1 based on species-richness, endemism and extinction threat, respectively. such hotspots pose man 
10665 1 based on species-richness, endemism and extinction threat, respectively. such hotspots pose man 
10683 1 based on species-richness, endemism and extinction threat, respectively. such hotspots pose man 
9899 1 based on species-richness, endemism and extinction threat, respectively. such hotspots pose man 
11041 5 his crisis is known as the permian mass extinction event. while the factors underlying this cri 
ge suffered a remarkable collapse. this extinction is the most dramatic of all large-scale biol 
that were poorly represented before the extinction, the emergence of new groups, and the establ 
eks to assess the impact of the permian extinction on terrestrial vertebrate communities. some  
s, but the patterns and dynamics of the extinction require detailed scrutiny. this project ther 
7144 1 area. the data show that the effects of climate change are recorded in the various components o 
7212 1 icular study the effect of land use and climate change on the abundance, diversity and function 
15416 1 reen vs deciduous species and native vs invasive species.  
2008 2                                         climate change at high latitudes is predicted to be gre 
ing the responses of vascular plants to climate change, very little is known about the response 
15171 2 for knowing and understanding how these impacts can affect the dynamics of its ecosystems. thes 
ystem and its response to anthropogenic impacts. however, the responses of various groups again 
15408 3 ve rather than additive. in particular, climate change and human-driven fragmentation are expec 
icular, climate change and human-driven fragmentation are expected to interact by both hamperin 
th hampering migration routes following climate change and by modifying local selective pressur 
14534 3 atic change as well as the antropogenic pollution, in which the research team has a borad exper 
ition.the reconstruction of atmospheric pollution recorded in ombrotrophic peats is also propos 
 limits of the intensity of the present pollution.the starting point supposes that the signals  
11069 9  robust and credible information on the impacts of climate change across the global domain; a g 
 credible information on the impacts of climate change across the global domain; a global persp 
spective also places local and regional impacts in context, and helps identify potential hotspo 
ect assesses the global-scale impact of climate change using a range of linked impact modules a 
les and impact indicators, representing impacts on water resources, flood risk, food production 
nting impacts on water resources, flood risk, food production, biodiversity and human health an 
identification of the risks of specific impacts occurring at different rates of climate change. 
impacts occurring at different rates of climate change. the methodology and results of the proj 
e a framework for the assessment of the impacts of defined climate policies. first, it allows d 
13802 1 and less optimal conditions the further global warming goes - unless birds rapidly adapt to the 
15367 6 lation of our planet and the increasing global warming produced by the greenhouse effect. this  
not only species but also ecosystems at risk. many scientists have remarked that the magnitude  
have remarked that the magnitude of the biodiversity loss seen today has only been recorded fiv 
 we could be going towards a sixth mass extinction. among all animals, vertebrates, above all a 
an communities turnovers caused by past global warming episodes of a comparable magnitude to cu 
al changes reflect a unique response to global warming or if these changes fall inside what we  
10064 2 lobal challenges of climate, fisheries, pollution, and ocean acidification. the funding request 
s of climate, fisheries, pollution, and ocean acidification. the funding requested is to pump p 
11405 3  such as escherichia coli o157 how will climate change, shifts in land use and extreme events a 
tors might increase a person s level of vulnerability how should planning and health protection 
ractions with soil and water; catchment risk assessment; water resource management; human healt 
11584 3  such as escherichia coli o157 how will climate change, shifts in land use and extreme events a 
tors might increase a person s level of vulnerability how should planning and health protection 
ractions with soil and water; catchment risk assessment; water resource management; human healt 
7250 4 rway on biodiversity. the fight against climate change, the erosion of biodiversity process is  
. the fight against climate change, the erosion of biodiversity process is the second major the 
s expected to locate areas of potential vulnerability based on their accessibility. - for each  
tive, it would better identify expected impacts on biodiversity. cartographic representation to 
7476 2  rainfall pattern trends, due to global climate change, add to this already serious situation:  
ater scarcity due to several factors as climate change, growing urbanisation of coasts, tourism 
12623 8 ey can contribute to attempts to offset climate change due to fossil fuel burning, steadily dra 
e destabilised by poor land-management, pollution, warming or drying, they can release co2 back 
o2 back to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate change. in addition, peatlands `leak` some of t 
unstable, for example through the gully erosion seen in areas such as the peak district. at pre 
se gas methane, this will contribute to global warming. by establishing how much of the total r 
tal river carbon flux is converted into greenhouse gases, we hope to be able to complete our un 
to global climate by helping to lock up greenhouse gases. to determine the fate of the riverine 
ultimately emitted to the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, and to identify methods of managing t 
11230 1 g cost-effectiveness and distributional impacts of mitigation policy. there is strong interest  
14154 1 ion is expected to accompany the global climate change in several parts of the world including  
7311 2 rmation on the status of the technical, environmental impacts and uncertainties. in other words 
 * produce a set of future scenarios of climate change; * fuel discussions within the energy mo 
7141 1 last 20 millennia in relation to global climate change. as part of this project, we set out to  
12707 1 rs, with reference to issues concerning climate change and wetlands, linking as appropriate to  
1932 8 otion that when studying the effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on biodiversity, it 
 general hypotheses that as a result of habitat fragmentation and isolation the stability of mu 
evel iv these processes are enforced by habitat fragmentation and isolation. more specifically  
sitoids or predators are susceptible to habitat fragmentation compared to their hosts leading t 
in fragmented populations and a greater extinction risk of the system as a whole. therefore, in 
ed populations and a greater extinction risk of the system as a whole. therefore, in this proje 
on the sensitivity of the hervbivore to fragmentation. as a model system we will use senecio ja 
he component species and the effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on the dynamics of  
11365 5                                         habitat fragmentation is one of the greatest threats to 
l data from the field on the effects of fragmentation on species interactions and the structure 
s are scarce. a replicated, large-scale habitat fragmentation experiment involving bracken habi 
in patches representing three levels of fragmentation. a series of hypotheses about the impact  
eries of hypotheses about the impact of fragmentation on community structure, food web statisti 
15262 3 ms around the world. the main causes of biodiversity loss and the so-called global change are c 
oss and the so-called global change are climate change and habitat loss and transformation. the 
ed global change are climate change and habitat loss and transformation. there is a large conse 
13602 7 ation on the order of disassembly after habitat loss and fragmentation, and assess if the speci 
r of disassembly after habitat loss and fragmentation, and assess if the species traits that pr 
ation success are the same that predict extinction risk. this project will contribute to our ge 
ss are the same that predict extinction risk. this project will contribute to our general under 
neral understanding of colonization and extinction processes in fragmented and restored landsca 
 stressors such as land use conversion, invasive species and climate change.  
nd use conversion, invasive species and climate change.  
15139 5 us to take into consideration that most invasive species are not in equilibrium with the enviro 
ay not reflect their total capacity for invasion, and thus will help us to assess what their fu 
me in spain, we will be able to develop risk maps of habitat invasion. we will alos generate di 
be able to develop risk maps of habitat invasion. we will alos generate distribution maps of in 
will alos generate distribution maps of invasive species for current conditions but also for fu 
15084 1  on populations. a complete analysis of impacts will permit rehabilitation, restoration and mit 
10162 1 environment that may be changing due to global warming. it will also give us some indication ab 
2115 1 st harvest strategies that minimize the risk of loss of genetic variation. furthermore, a poten 
14377 1 d a lot of public concern regarding the vulnerability of these unique heathland ecosystems to u 
14679 1 tant acid ph and high concentrations of heavy metals. these unusual conditions are the reason w 
7217 2 ring systems, source of biodiversity or pollution buffer has been demonstrated in other regions 
iodiversity; 2 / quantify the impact of human impacts on seagrass. the expected products are al 
7434 1 tions for managers in a context of high fragmentation and global changes. 2. develop a composit 
13325 1 s integrated governance policy enabling risk assessment, management, conservation and rehabilit 
13340 2 se ecosystems are now being affected by climate change and impacted by man through fishing, res 
ce extraction, seabed installations and pollution. to design and implement effective governance 
11168 6                                         climate change has been described as one of the most pr 
tific advisor to the government and its impacts are to be seen both in terrestrial and marine e 
nic water circulation controls regional climate change in north west europe and also affects ma 
ade emissions. if attempts to model the impacts of future climate change on marine ecosystems a 
attempts to model the impacts of future climate change on marine ecosystems and associated fish 
ons in determining how predicted future climate change is likely to impact marine ecosystems an 
10270 1 due to historic and current atmospheric pollution, inappropriate land management and wildfires, 
13341 1 cosystem, livelihoods and institutional impacts assessed through participatory monitoring and e 
7481 1 cosystem, livelihoods and institutional impacts assessed through participatory monitoring and e 
11640 8 ity is experiencing a dramatically high extinction rate unprecedented in its severity, and huma 
rate unprecedented in its severity, and human impact now ensures that extinction continues to t 
rity, and human impact now ensures that extinction continues to threaten our remaining species  
s to a species decline towards eventual extinction. experiments using model species, either in  
deal set of species with which to study extinction, because a large proportion of hawaiian bird 
oss this time period, we can examine if extinction of the o o involved a period of small popula 
between levels of genetic diversity and extinction. the projects findings will be interpreted a 
o conservation science, and recovery of endangered species.  
2135 3 es in precipitation, as consequences of global warming, are predicted to affect both terrestria 
tation are predicted as consequences of global warming, and increases in winter precipitation w 
redicting the consequences of different climate change scenarios on freshwater ecosystem in the 
15215 1 nges that may be enhanced by the coming climate change. the baseline of ecosystems in gran cana 
10130 2 climate that will be affected by future global warming, such as ice sheet volume ocean circulat 
lationships between oceanic terrestrial climate change, to enable future soil conditions water  
10416 2 climate that will be affected by future global warming, such as ice sheet volume ocean circulat 
lationships between oceanic terrestrial climate change, to enable future soil conditions water  
11698 2 climate that will be affected by future global warming, such as ice sheet volume ocean circulat 
lationships between oceanic terrestrial climate change, to enable future soil conditions water  
9889 2 climate that will be affected by future global warming, such as ice sheet volume ocean circulat 
lationships between oceanic terrestrial climate change, to enable future soil conditions water  
11333 1  studies on modern peatland ecology and fire will provide generic skills training attuned to rc 
14531 1 nellis eagle hieraaetus fasciatus is an endangered species that is declining in all europe. the 
10924 2 itional environments, and environmental/climate change, has been largely unrealised. however, t 
t can be usefully applied as markers of climate change.  
10234 1  the mechanisms by which communities of natural enemies develop around invading or introduced p 
10433 1  the mechanisms by which communities of natural enemies develop around invading or introduced p 
10018 8 erstanding the spatial heterogeneity of disease. the risk of parasite infection in wild populat 
e spatial heterogeneity of disease. the risk of parasite infection in wild populations varies i 
, or inherent spatial processes such as disease clustering. does a site have a high level of di 
ering. does a site have a high level of disease infection due to the local environment, or beca 
 predict the distribution and spread of disease that take account of this spatial dimension pro 
st dispersal, maternal immunity and the risk of malaria infection in generating the spatial pat 
n in generating the spatial patterns of disease we see in our study population. these models wi 
e increasing our wider understanding of disease.  
10290 8 erstanding the spatial heterogeneity of disease. the risk of parasite infection in wild populat 
e spatial heterogeneity of disease. the risk of parasite infection in wild populations varies i 
, or inherent spatial processes such as disease clustering. does a site have a high level of di 
ering. does a site have a high level of disease infection due to the local environment, or beca 
 predict the distribution and spread of disease that take account of this spatial dimension pro 
st dispersal, maternal immunity and the risk of malaria infection in generating the spatial pat 
n in generating the spatial patterns of disease we see in our study population. these models wi 
e increasing our wider understanding of disease.  
15178 5  explorative to hesitant, neophobic and risk aversive. such differences in personalities can be 
 behavior may have consequences for the risk of acquiring parasites and hence for the transmiss 
sites and hence for the transmission of disease. we propose to test for interactions between ho 
hen relate host personality behavior to risk of exposure to insect vectors of blood parasites,  
 the potential to identify variation in risk of infection and transmission among hosts, providi 
9874 3 ral and anthropogenic stressors such as global warming, ocean acidification, rising pollution,  
genic stressors such as global warming, ocean acidification, rising pollution, overfishing, att 
al warming, ocean acidification, rising pollution, overfishing, attacks by predators or pathoge 
11588 1 , virulent parasites that cause obvious disease. however, infections frequently involve more th 
14704 2 s geographic ranges, and the effects of climate change on species distributions are important f 
the future responses of biodiversity to climate change both generally and in threatened montane 
13922 6 hies among boreal ants are regulated by disturbance due to fire and forestry and consequent cha 
nts are regulated by disturbance due to fire and forestry and consequent changes in resource av 
andscapes today. modern forestry alters fire regimes, thus altering the abilities of species to 
oration programs aim to restore natural fire regimes, however their effectiveness for epigaeic  
lated disturbances, may also have large impacts on ant assemblages. i will use large-scale mani 
ted by disturbances due to forestry and fire and consequent changes in resource availability. t 
9876 2 nd therefore potentially increase flood risk; ii erosion, deposition and sediment transport rat 
ore potentially increase flood risk; ii erosion, deposition and sediment transport rates; and i 
12255 1 as the benefits of potentially reducing soil erosion and halting or reversing declines in farml 
11401 3 hanges, such as habitat destruction and global warming. in order to maintain natural ecosystems 
 allow us to make predictions about the impacts of processes such as habitat conversion and cli 
rocesses such as habitat conversion and climate change on the structure of natural ecosystems.  
2167 1 ment , and the strategic plan to manage alien species.  
10488 4 hey have been implicated in a series of extinction events coinciding with their arrival in diff 
e are able to recognise these different extinction events in the recent past from fossil or sub 
onment, and possible effects that their extinction would have had on west indian ecosystem stru 
etermine the full extent of prehistoric species loss, and ultimately use the past to understand 
10520 4 hat exacerbate losses. an unprecedented extinction of species is underway, and climate change i 
 extinction of species is underway, and climate change is affecting species range and phenology 
em services in unpredictable ways. with climate change and continued habitat alteration entaile 
cision makers to consider biodiversity, climate change and human livelihoods together .  
11528 4 hat exacerbate losses. an unprecedented extinction of species is underway, and climate change i 
 extinction of species is underway, and climate change is affecting species range and phenology 
em services in unpredictable ways. with climate change and continued habitat alteration entaile 
cision makers to consider biodiversity, climate change and human livelihoods together .  
9951 4 at ex-acerbate losses. an unprecedented extinction of species is underway, and climate change i 
 extinction of species is underway, and climate change is af-fecting species range and phenolog 
em services in unpredictable ways. with climate change and continued habitat alteration entaile 
cision makers to consider biodiversity, climate change and human livelihoods together .  
13796 4 proposed project i create an impact and risk assessment on several spatial scales with respect  
 and in scandinavia, experience intense human impact. i will analyze moose gps location data fr 
features. to address the spatiotemporal risk for wildlife road-crossings, i will develop a gene 
will develop a general model concerning risk assessment using a multi-year data set of moose gp 
11081 1 at are rarely studied. data obtained on human impacts on corals reefs on reef cryptofauna, in c 
15060 7                                         habitat fragmentation reduces the flow of individuals b 
tween populations, constituting a major risk of biodiversity loss. the great bustard is a globa 
pulations, constituting a major risk of biodiversity loss. the great bustard is a globally enda 
y loss. the great bustard is a globally endangered species that has recently suffered dramatic  
ture intensification, and human-induced habitat fragmentation. the iberian peninsula represents 
ract isolation, and prevent the species extinction. this project aims to assess the impact of c 
tion dynamics indicate ways to minimize human impacts on the conservation of the species and it 
13342 1 , economic and ecological functions and impacts of hunting across a range of contexts in europe 
7658 3 ing environmental contamination and its impacts on the ecosystem. the biological indices curren 
 temporal variability of contamination, invasive species now widely present in temperate aquati 
rritory in terms of modification of the runoff, sources of micro and ecotoxicological impact on 
7047 1 spots, but are endangered by increasing drought periods and forest fires. only two studies on s 
10885 1 e case. the planned research focuses on climate change during a time period known as the oligoc 
1985 1 h and winter survival will benefit from climate change related increases in mean sea water temp 
15480 1  on the biodiversity as a result of the climate change, between other factors, and considering  
15433 1 mmals, including human and domestic and endangered species, depends on gonad development, which 
10102 1  allow to progress in understanding dms degradation in the marine environment.  
6833 1 and an x-linked genetic disorder: fabry disease, too. current modern dna-diagnostic methods hav 
15103 1  its expected tendency in relation with climate change  
12613 1 of which is an essential input into any risk evaluation. the situation is compounded by the cur 
12406 2 at 1 collating key details on collision risk to birds from offshore wind installations, 2 id ra 
farm during certain periods , seriously impacts the financial viability of wind farm proposals  
10502 1 ne and freshwater fish to contribute to environmental impact assessment and regulation of disch 
10244 1 ne and freshwater fish to contribute to environmental impact assessment and regulation of disch 
10246 1 ne and freshwater fish to contribute to environmental impact assessment and regulation of disch 
10742 1 ne and freshwater fish to contribute to environmental impact assessment and regulation of disch 
11220 1 ne and freshwater fish to contribute to environmental impact assessment and regulation of disch 
12227 1 ral resources, their potential negative impacts on local environments and water quality, and th 
11840 1 s is an important topic, because global climate change will expose animals to changing temperat 
11153 2 localisation and enumeration. microbial degradation can break down and detoxify polycyclic arom 
bioremediation technologies and for the risk assessment for impacted ecosystems.  
10202 2 designating catchment zones that are at risk from erosion and sedimentation.  
g catchment zones that are at risk from erosion and sedimentation.  
10514 14 he rise. 2010 has been a year of severe drought and fire in amazonia. over the last months , fi 
0 has been a year of severe drought and fire in amazonia. over the last months , fire ecologist 
ire in amazonia. over the last months , fire ecologists, climatologists as well as forest carbo 
ive analysis of the climatology of this drought, the extent of forest fires and the carbon loss 
ll measure the different facets of this drought in multiple scales to provide a comprehensive a 
ovide a comprehensive assessment of its impacts. we will initially quantify the spatial extent  
ally quantify the spatial extent of the drought and associated forest fires based on a combinat 
 extensive field survey to quantify the impacts of fires on carbon stocks and the functioning o 
arbon stocks and the functioning of the fire-affected forests. finally, we will generate the fi 
te the first basin-wide map of the 2010 drought-induced fire impact on the amazonian carbon sto 
in-wide map of the 2010 drought-induced fire impact on the amazonian carbon stocks by integrati 
ion to help understand and diagnose the impacts of future events, but will also provide support 
of public policies in order to mitigate climate change impacts in this region.  
ies in order to mitigate climate change impacts in this region.  
10490 5 s our warming climate is increasing the risk of disease as parasites become more abundant. dise 
rming climate is increasing the risk of disease as parasites become more abundant. disease is a 
ease as parasites become more abundant. disease is a common threat that could change the amount 
ring behaviours and immune responses to disease are both controlled by the same hormones in a v 
ontrolled and how they change in a high risk environment.  
11543 5 s our warming climate is increasing the risk of disease as parasites become more abundant. dise 
rming climate is increasing the risk of disease as parasites become more abundant. disease is a 
ease as parasites become more abundant. disease is a common threat that could change the amount 
ring behaviours and immune responses to disease are both controlled by the same hormones in a v 
ontrolled and how they change in a high risk environment.  
14196 2                           infection and disease is a complex interplay in which many factors ar 
sually normal viral infections, and the disease becomes quite serious. we have shown that porci 
7295 1 ns, to better control the phenomenon of biological invasions. we want to test the hypothesis of 
10030 2 vertebrate, are afflicted by infectious disease, but in spite of medical and veterinary advance 
y ignorant of the effects of infectious disease on natural to be common.  
10540 2 vertebrate, are afflicted by infectious disease, but in spite of medical and veterinary advance 
y ignorant of the effects of infectious disease on natural to be common.  
15343 1 ades in sediments, and consequently the risk of poisoning remains present. lead poisoning is an 
13733 1 t frequently occurs as a consequence of eutrophication of coastal areas, release from the sedim 
10776 1 knowledge gaps in the evidence base for risk characterisation of mnm, a key requisite for the e 
7175 2 e and settlement of larvae rivers funds invasion modifie- does the structure and functioning of 
es. dreissena polymorpha this increased vulnerability in an unstable environment and current di 
14779 2 gnized as a major serious cause of bird extinction scales explaining biodiversity. results will 
res to alleviate the potential negative impacts of agriculture intensification permitting the c 
12225 3 ility of pesticides in europe will have impacts on all areas of uk agriculture and horticulture 
 looking at the economic and production impacts of changing pesticide availability on a range o 
omic analysis or investigation of wider impacts, such as those from wfd and market pressures on 
161 1 stands under the possible impact of the climate change and ii the impact of warming and increas 
147 3  the north atlantic oscillation index . climate change affects the balance of heat, water and s 
dependant on phytoplankton exudates and degradation products. two estonian large lakes võrtsjär 
e lakes enable to analyse the impact of climate change on the ecosystems. monthly data on phyto 
12435 2 nting the strategic plan of the cod and climate change programme and other co-operative interna 
international studies on the effects of climate change on the marine ecosystem. key customer pu 
7129 3 petition if the increase of co2 promote invasive species over native species in terms of phenol 
t ipcc scenarios and thus determine how global warming may affect biodiversity. in terms of man 
will assess the change in the impact of biological invasions under the influence of the increas 
11147 1 one of the most prominent signatures of climate change is progressively increasing levels of at 
7131 1 is ecosystem will predict the effect of global warming on the regeneration of larch forest, for 
427 1 ldwide has highly increased. the global climate change is probably one of the major causes lead 
7143 1                                   tags: climate change, phylogeography, mammals, refuges, genet 
1933 5  dynamics and rates of colonization and extinction in a model multitrophic system of a plant, a 
 the model system are more sensitive to fragmentation than the herbivore and are more frequentl 
d tot he sensitivity of the pathogen to fragmentation. the results will be used to test the gen 
 general hypothesis that as a result of habitat fragmentation and isolation the stability of mu 
 and iv these processes are enforced by habitat fragmentation and isolation. specific hypothese 
13592 1 ke or an indirect effect leading to the degradation of water quality in nursery grounds. we wil 
14983 3 es which are unique and/or in danger of extinction. these ecosystems are also strategic places  
essure, suffering important degradative impacts. the study will be mainly focused in pedologic, 
onse patterns under continued anthropic impacts. reults and conclusions obtained would constitu 
14110 1                                         climate change scenarios predict wetter conditions for  
14506 1  task is a research on the influence of introduced species on native species. four points wil b 
10305 3 al stability and it s ability to resist erosion, and interact closely with plants to maintain b 
millennium ecosystem assessment. so any impacts of nanoparticles on the normal functioning of s 
y humans, and to indicate the degree of risk associated with their use.  
11140 1  additional dimension to the nerc/defra ocean acidification research programme by not only stud 
15448 5                                     the climate change is an evident fact in our country. the r 
 are revealing the effect on the of the climate change of different plant species, indicating a 
ain a deeper knowledge of the impact of climate change on different plant species in the studie 
will help to predict the effects of the global warming on natural populations and to the develo 
egies of conservation in the context of climate change in the iberian peninsula.  
7626 4 ded land subject to the slope, flood or drought. the objective of the study is to evaluate the  
ts placed in two contexts fight against erosion bioengineered: 1 slope revegetation by planting 
veness of biological engineering works. soil erosion in certain situations justify the establis 
role in soil protection against surface erosion at the recovery of organic waste by finding new 
14440 1 dy could be used for the preparation of environmental impact assessments and ecological assessm 
14223 1 nowledge on measuring heterogeneity and fragmentation of landscape on different levels and link 
11675 4 st because of their economic and social impacts, but are also important to understand from the  
y concentrate on the immediate damaging impacts of extreme flooding, less information is availa 
mation is available about the long term impacts of changes in river channel. the latter is impo 
nnels which may lessen subsequent flood risk. this is accepted within a raft of legislation whe 
543 5 modelling techniques to investigate the impacts of climate change on plant communities comprisi 
echniques to investigate the impacts of climate change on plant communities comprising herbaceo 
espond to elevated temperature , summer drought and elevated atmospheric co2 treatments. we dem 
mitigate the negative effects of summer drought on aboveground biomass, and may facilitate wood 
 montpellier shows a negative effect of drought on net photosynthesis, transpiration rates and  
7469 1 ment of species and their occurrence or extinction 150 years of data on a regional scale. . und 
11433 1  in our ecological understanding of the impacts of parasitic angiosperms in communities where t 
10155 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
10414 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
10422 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
10758 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
10915 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
11423 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
11693 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
11706 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
9879 6 ubstantial environmental and economical impacts. during several recent international meetings s 
 of understanding is a major problem as ocean acidification is a rapidly evolving management is 
t the marine environment in the face of ocean acidification. this consortium brings together 25 
, predict and communicate the impact of ocean acidification on biodiversity and ecosystem funct 
eriments to determine the ways in which ocean acidification will change key physiological proce 
m will also act as a focal point for uk ocean acidification research promoting communication be 
11270 1 a on fish recruitment as a component of climate change. such information is important since cli 
12571 2 cy customers on the potential impact of climate change scenarios, as predicted by ukcp09, and t 
tocks and the potential implications of climate change which will contribute to the development 
12368 1  and government to canvass views on the impacts of these regulations. defra wants to ensure tha 
2054 1 nd earthworms are used as indicators of fragmentation effects on landscape level. four regions  
10032 1 form nitrogen through processes such as nitrification or denitrification. the latter converts n 
11842 1 form nitrogen through processes such as nitrification or denitrification. the latter converts n 
15521 3  and regional scale, exploring a strong drought gradient. we will also analise the histological 
e will study the functional response to drought in different woody species. we will try to know 
e will try to predict the effect of the climate change on the reforestation programs. in summar 
13885 2 ility. 2 to identify the life stages of invasive plants with the most potential for control act 
ocus management actions. in addition to invasive species, the results can be applied to conserv 
12274 3 ems. high water abstraction and diffuse pollution from fertilisers can have negative impacts on 
tion from fertilisers can have negative impacts on adjacent ecosystems. since, water is the mos 
ategy for reducing diffuse agricultural pollution. following recent steep increases in the pric 
12239 2                                         weeds remain a major constraint to cost effective crop  
ny wild plants, which may be considered weeds in cropping situations, are also considered to ha 
11597 1 the project will therefore achieve rcuk impacts through enhancing environmental sustainability  
12035 2 e refugium of fauna during hydrological disturbance . using dna analyses we studied the induced 
the relation between water movement and degradation rates. below a porosity threshold the inver 
13724 2 evidence that inbreeding contributes to extinction. and he was right. not because there were st 
ets these synergistic routes to fitness erosion in a vertebrate group that currently is experie 
13825 1 bility to sarcoptic mange, a prevalanet disease in the population. we will also evaluate the us 
12050 3 ural and social practices, climate, and fire, and will develop a geographic information system  
iodiversity. human practices related to fire will be studied through interviews in representati 
sed and modelled over nc to improve the fire weather index.  
13576 1  this area. one reason for this is that climate change might further reduce the genetic variati 
13745 1 ss scales in space, time, and function. climate change will not only bring about changes in spe 
7188 3  direct influence on the dynamics of an invasion. the particular structure of an invasive popul 
ctly for its ecological effects against invasive species may have evolutionary effects exactly  
 operations targeting mechanisms of the invasive species in order to place it on an "evolutiona 
10151 2 ccurate predictions of population-level impacts of proposed changes to fishery discarding pract 
practices in europe and climate related impacts on the availability of naturally occurring fora 
11419 2 ccurate predictions of population-level impacts of proposed changes to fishery discarding pract 
practices in europe and climate related impacts on the availability of naturally occurring fora 
11771 2 ccurate predictions of population-level impacts of proposed changes to fishery discarding pract 
practices in europe and climate related impacts on the availability of naturally occurring fora 
10521 1 tion in rainfall, food availability and disease. by exploring the unusual ecological mechanisms 
11010 1 tion in rainfall, food availability and disease. by exploring the unusual ecological mechanisms 
1959 2 indirect plant defences act by offering natural enemies of herbivores shelter, food or chemical 
ssicae is aposematic and gregarious. as natural enemies two closely related parasitic wasp spec 
13532 2 esistance in g. vermiculophylla against natural enemies in its new environment are important in 
t are important in order to predict the invasion success of the alga and to outline protocols f 
6740 2 cid composition of barley, the salt and drought tolerance of aegilops biuncialis, and the disea 
lerance of aegilops biuncialis, and the disease resistance of agropyron glael and the exact ori 
7489 1 lic and that methods, ethics, risks and risk assessment are open for debate. the keywords of ou 
15338 1       nowadays, habitat destruction and fragmentation are major threats to the biodiversity con 
13577 1                                         climate change has been predicted to cause increased ri 
10132 1                       the study of past climate change, especially that which has occurred sinc 
10664 1                       the study of past climate change, especially that which has occurred sinc 
15400 2 the increase of anthropogenic land use, fragmentation of habitat conservation is the most frequ 
one of the most serious consequences of fragmentation is the local or regional loss of species. 
7705 3 on to an overall reduction of parasitic risk. this knowledge can then be mobilized to provide e 
els resulting in a natural control this risk, in particular by reducing the colonization potent 
 amplification of biological control by natural enemies. in this context, the general objective 
15437 1 namics due of their contribution to the degradation and incorporation of nutrients to the ecosy 
14171 1 ll receive special attention. as global climate change implies simultaneous modification of mul 
14713 1 n will be used to quantify the rates of nitrification, assimilation and denitrification at the  
14714 1 her limit ecosystem production or favor eutrophication; this in turn, may affect the capacity o 
224 1 ssment of coastal ecosystem response to eutrophication.  
7177 1 ect aims to test two hypotheses: is the invasion determined: and the influence of man  
15085 3 ibians, as well as on their demography, extinction risk and maintenance of genetic variability. 
well as on their demography, extinction risk and maintenance of genetic variability. amphibians 
demism are high evaluation of landscape fragmentation and its impact on amphibian populations.  
15470 2  adopting this phenotype in a potential risk for public health. throughout the year, it has bee 
 is detected again, and some associated disease outbreaks can occur. some physiological and mol 
13500 3 tality in wild birds. raptors may be at risk, particularly those that feed on other birdswe wil 
y difference between groups of birds at risk of acquiring aiv infections. presence of receptors 
ill give knowledge that can be used for risk assessment. the h5n1 is originating in domestic an 
6854 2                      inflammatory bowel disease that belongs to the group of barrier diseases i 
arrier diseases is represented as crohn disease will be responsible for patient recruitment. a  
7483 1 rease in n surplus. this has a negative environmental impact on groundwater . the eu seeks to s 
14288 1                         contextinvasive exotic species  
454 1 in order to measure the fullness of the disease, identify entire set of plants hosting striga a 
403 1  first step a preliminary environmental risk assessment for some of the most common pesticides  
11776 4 m model-based predictions on how future climate change will affect european biodiversity. curre 
pecies distribution models suggest that climate change will cause habitats to shift or contract 
wards, and will result in high rates of extinction for the coming 100 years. however, such pred 
empo and mode of population response to climate change, as well as to evaluate, adjust and empl 
472 4 m model-based predictions on how future climate change will affect european biodiversity. curre 
pecies distribution models suggest that climate change will cause habitats to shift or contract 
wards, and will result in high rates of extinction for the coming 100 years. however, such pred 
empo and mode of population response to climate change, as well as to evaluate, adjust and empl 
12542 1 identified as the causal agent of a new disease on begonia in europe and diseased material was  
10536 4  predicting how species will respond to climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing 
 to alter their range as rapidly as the climate change. there are likely to be interactions bet 
a population changes during a period of climate change due to species changing their distributi 
e expected to evolve during a period of climate change.  
9825 4  predicting how species will respond to climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing 
 to alter their range as rapidly as the climate change. there are likely to be interactions bet 
a population changes during a period of climate change due to species changing their distributi 
e expected to evolve during a period of climate change.  
15304 1 ges of aquatic beetles, and explore the vulnerability of populations and species to a changing  
10425 9 reasingly difficult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threa 
ult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threat of global chan 
d the threat of global changes, such as climate change. until now, conservationists have been m 
r of ways. firstly, many populations of endangered species are isolated and consist of small nu 
se without it, species will be prone to extinction under environmental changes such as climate  
ion under environmental changes such as climate change. secondly, small or isolated populations 
this can act as an additional burden on endangered species, making their populations more diffi 
work for assessing which species are at risk of which genetic problems, or decision-making tool 
 will develop a mechanism to assess the risk of genetic problems faced by any individual specie 
10990 9 reasingly difficult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threa 
ult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threat of global chan 
d the threat of global changes, such as climate change. until now, conservationists have been m 
r of ways. firstly, many populations of endangered species are isolated and consist of small nu 
se without it, species will be prone to extinction under environmental changes such as climate  
ion under environmental changes such as climate change. secondly, small or isolated populations 
this can act as an additional burden on endangered species, making their populations more diffi 
work for assessing which species are at risk of which genetic problems, or decision-making tool 
 will develop a mechanism to assess the risk of genetic problems faced by any individual specie 
11173 9 reasingly difficult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threa 
ult given the extent of degradation and fragmentation of habitats and the threat of global chan 
d the threat of global changes, such as climate change. until now, conservationists have been m 
r of ways. firstly, many populations of endangered species are isolated and consist of small nu 
se without it, species will be prone to extinction under environmental changes such as climate  
ion under environmental changes such as climate change. secondly, small or isolated populations 
this can act as an additional burden on endangered species, making their populations more diffi 
work for assessing which species are at risk of which genetic problems, or decision-making tool 
 will develop a mechanism to assess the risk of genetic problems faced by any individual specie 
11167 1 c modelling is central to research into climate change and air quality. the description of chem 
10649 1  soils and how this will be affected by climate change and soil management.  
15115 9 nge is likely to have its most critical impacts on ecosystem structure and functioning through  
 the world including the mediterranean. fire regime is highly sensitive to climate change, land 
ean. fire regime is highly sensitive to climate change, land use and forest management. in medi 
diterranean regions, current changes in fire regime are expected to produce important shifts in 
tice on the response of bird species to fire regime in dynamic landscapes. these modelling syst 
uantitatively the effects of changes in fire regime and climate derived from the interactions o 
 processes and key interactions between fire regime and species bird distributions in landscape 
dscape level of the relationships among fire regime and species distributions objective 3. proj 
os of landscape changes under different fire regimes of a number of focal bird species with dif 
15200 1 ity, allowing predicting the effects of climate change on biotic communities.  
9882 2 across europe under the joint impact of climate change and human-induced shift in land use. one 
e hypotheses tested that pertain to the impacts of climate and land use changes on biodiversity 
480 2 across europe under the joint impact of climate change and human-induced shift in land use. one 
aneously in much of europe in the 1990s impacts on demographic parameters of predators that exp 
14153 6                          the problem of environmental impacts on forest growth is important in  
that direct and photosynthesis-mediated environmental impacts on plant growth can be separated  
hotosynthesis and growth. previous year environmental impacts via bud formation, the formation  
hambers help to make difference between environmental impacts occurring simultaneously in field 
decide about signifficance of different environmental impacts during predicted climate change.  
 environmental impacts during predicted climate change.  
13826 2 gulates in relation to tree cutting and fire. we aim at quantifying critical thresholds for co- 
n to unravel the relative importance of disturbance and browsing on aspen recruitment. a novel  
9849 1 in exposure modelling and environmental risk assessment.  
15194 3 nuclides, the actinides. the associated risk of the disposal of these wastes depends not only o 
s are able to interact efficiently with heavy metals and radionuclides through different mechan 
l be useful in predicting the microbial impacts on the performance of the waste repositories as 
15500 1 generalized how important is the remote fragmentation of continuous areas are the cases of para 
6863 2  to learn about polymorphism related to disease susceptibilities and some pathogens frequently  
tion of enzyme polymorphisms related to disease susceptibilities, and population genetic studie 
15089 1 n terrestrial ecosystems, acting in the degradation and incorporation of nutrients to the ecosy 
10938 1                  we will use the recent invasion of american lobsters into european waters as a 
10777 1 latively poor at being transmitted as a disease from pest to pest after spraying. improved tran 
11165 1 latively poor at being transmitted as a disease from pest to pest after spraying. improved tran 
15322 6                                         biological invasions in aquatic habitats are among the  
y mechanistic processes that may enable invasive species to establish in the face of novel envi 
eir introduction. the ongoing spread of invasive species in aquatic ecosystems calls for an urg 
for an urgent and detailed study of the invasion history and the interactions with native speci 
ge of invasive crustaceans has negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems. the american brine shrim 
will measure the response of native and invasive species, both in terms of survival and in diff 
2040 1 conceptual model of invasions of marine exotic species. this model considers only one donor reg 
15578 1 will be applied to explore scenarios of impacts on the environment resulting from policies inte 
15254 2                                invasive introduced species are a huge environmental issue, part 
abundance and ecological and economical impacts are formidable. the objective of our project is 
12151 2 cations on spread and naturalization of alien species. the aim of this project is to assess the 
tries will be analysed and the possible invasion of this species in ecosystems of lithuania wil 
14279 1                                         biological invasions are considered an increasing threa 
7176 3 an approach which assigns, rightly, the invasive species qualifier aboriginal and especially th 
iginal and especially that assesses the impacts of this invasion an ecosystem scale  
ially that assesses the impacts of this invasion an ecosystem scale  
7180 5 orticultural trade is a major source of introduced species in the world. in this study, we focu 
the species. b. halimifolia therefore a risk that more High c. selloana for the maintenance of  
he management of these two species, and invasive species in general what their words and attitu 
at the public knows or does not know of invasive species our sociological research is based on  
how that they do not know or little the biological invasion process. many of them even think th 
13594 1 o date been focused on this species, or invasion by phytoplankton in general. the aim of this p 
15316 4                                         invasive species can pose a major threat to the biotic  
establishment and eventual expansion of invasive species in aquatic systems are not well unders 
ns of pumpkinseed at several scales and invasion risk through the prediction of the potential r 
pkinseed at several scales and invasion risk through the prediction of the potential range dist 
10497 3 ental approaches to explore the role of natural enemies in facilitating the coexistence of comp 
 on the impact of assembly sequence, or invasion, on insect community stability and dynamics. t 
oth species and their interactions with natural enemies that differ markedly in life history st 
10580 3 ental approaches to explore the role of natural enemies in facilitating the coexistence of comp 
 on the impact of assembly sequence, or invasion, on insect community stability and dynamics. t 
oth species and their interactions with natural enemies that differ markedly in life history st 
10996 3 ental approaches to explore the role of natural enemies in facilitating the coexistence of comp 
 on the impact of assembly sequence, or invasion, on insect community stability and dynamics. t 
oth species and their interactions with natural enemies that differ markedly in life history st 
7169 1  schistosomiasis were included, but the invasion by the thiaridés concurrently with the disappe 
7243 4                                   goals biological invasions are the second factor responsible  
 for the loss of biodiversity after the disturbance of natural habitats. their impact is on dif 
rent levels: ecologically, invasions by alien species can lead to reduced species diversity in  
of ecosystem functions. socio -economic impacts are as varied as the increase in allergic pheno 
15331 3                                  exotic invasive species assessing the impacts of exotic trees  
  exotic invasive species assessing the impacts of exotic trees on the functions of affected aq 
hree aims we will be able to assess the risk of exotic trees naturalized in floodplains to terr 
7162 3  phenomena in general we selected as an introduced species. it appears that an effective low nu 
ry of endemism. tags: drosophila model, invasive species, ecological intraspecific divergence,  
polymorphism, evolutionary scenarios of invasion  
14841 4                                         invasion by nonindigenous species is recognized as a ma 
 next years. the population genetics of invasive species has been relatively unexplored, even t 
success and provides important data for risk assessment. the eastern mosquitofish . ongoing res 
 identify dispersal routes used by this invasive species. 3- to assess the effect of hydrologic 
14840 2                                         invasive species are the second threat to diversity aft 
re the second threat to diversity after habitat loss and a leading mechanism of global change,  
2199 3 derstood that no field experiments with introduced species are to be carried out unless the spe 
 the area. characterization of areas at risk depends on which type of organisms the applicant w 
se, however, is less well-known. from a risk perspective they are highly important as a dispers 
11624 1  each site, to determine the effects of climate change during the height of the last glaciation 
12552 2  determine which honey bees exhibit efb disease resistance. initially, genetic stock will be so 
wn efb symptoms despite being in a high risk area. these apparently resistant bees will be char 
10605 1  also increase species ability to track climate change. however, such changes have rarely been  
11349 1 ave contributed to glacial-interglacial climate change by modulating oceanic nutrient inventori 
6965 1               one of the most dangerous disease of potato is late blight caused by the pathogen 
11451 2 ocio-economic status of individuals and pollution so the development of the disease can be used 
and pollution so the development of the disease can be used to interpret changing environments  
6864 4 oint of view asthma is a multifactorial disease. this means that the susceptibility to the dise 
is means that the susceptibility to the disease results from interaction of several genes and i 
hma, for the treatment of the developed disease, or for identifying new drug targets, it is nec 
aying role in the pathomechanism of the disease. in our study for the investigation of the gene 
168 1 ies that tend to behave as invasives or weeds show less irregularity in their dynamics. the mai 
11127 5 irst study to determine and compare the impacts of n deposition on the distinctive mechanisms o 
ajor plant types. it will determine the impacts of n deposition on plant p supply and determine 
nt p supply and determine whether these impacts can drive species change. it will also determin 
ether vegetation can recover from these impacts on p supply when n deposition declines as a res 
ty. it will inform policy makers of the impacts of pollutant n loading and allow us to better p 
13522 4 e long run – that there is a so called ‘extinction debt. the empirical evidences for the existe 
rical evidences for the existence of an extinction debt are however weak, probably because data 
he matrix, have experienced a continued species loss for many years, i.e. indication of the exi 
 i.e. indication of the existence of an extinction debt.  
10805 4 scientists to collect information about climate change, in response to growing public concerns  
ng public concerns about issues such as global warming and the hole in earth s ozone layer. sin 
lts and drains into the oceans, causing sea level rise. the costs of this simple relationship c 
r 50 mm. that ice would be seriously at risk if the larsen-c section were to collapse. we have  
10879 1 oceanic islands is well documented. the extinction of macrofauna, such as giant tortoises and f 
7219 1 . these islands are experiencing strong degradation of natural habitats, undisturbed forests re 
12423 1 e used to model the economic and social impacts of changes to ecosystem goods and services, and 
7468 1 l examine and model economic and social impacts of changes to ecosystem goods and services and  
459 1 these islands are subject to an intense degradation of natural habitats, undisturbed forests re 
10544 2 entially have wide reaching deleterious impacts on wildlife and possibly humans, and are at the 
nment agency s agenda for environmental pollution. population level declines in wildlife have r 
10033 1  testing about the causal mechanisms of climate change, especially concerning the relative timi 
10783 1  testing about the causal mechanisms of climate change, especially concerning the relative timi 
11559 1  testing about the causal mechanisms of climate change, especially concerning the relative timi 
2171 2 cidating two likely cascading ecosystem impacts of reindeer overabundance in finnmark. one casc 
de we predict to be induced by loss and fragmentation of riparian willow habitats due to reinde 
2525 3 the currently expanding frontier of the disease, and the aim of this proposal is to provide key 
 causative agent, genetic structure and disease resistance of norwegian ash populations. no pri 
ustainable management of ash stands and disease-free propagation of the tree.  
2520 2 gnificance of red deer migration for an invasive species, the tick, and vice versa at the altit 
havior and performance. in wp3, we link disease in ticks to migratory behavior and performance  
2521 1 tect wild reindeer lands against future habitat loss to piecemeal development. reindeer is a vu 
2545 1 gery to detect deforestation and forest degradation. norut is involved in several tropical fore 
2524 2 ded negatively to forest management and fragmentation. the ecology and distribution of many dea 
fe-history traits are linked with their vulnerability to the effects of forestry. this will ena 
13571 1 onstrated that scape length affects the risk of grazing damage, but also seed predation and pol 
13986 1 persal in patchy landscapes with a high human impact, and to model effects of functional and sp 
12610 4  and have high environmental and social impacts. a number of different methods will be used to  
ded benefits in terms of costs or wider environmental impacts they could bring. this will be us 
essment of the environmental and social impacts and benefits of each remediation technique will 
include direct costs and wider economic impacts and benefits. understanding these aspects will  
13723 2 ion of agricultural landscapes leads to fragmentation and loss of species-rich semi-natural gra 
trol biodiversity. theory predicts that habitat fragmentation will be followed by loss of speci 
15032 2 sity losses at a global scale. however, fragmentation science is still ambiguous and unable to  
ng how ecosystems response to landscape degradation. despite the abundant findings on the funct 
439 1 ing awareness of the adverse effects of habitat fragmentation on natural systems has resulted i 
10411 4 g and regulating es, including pest and disease regulation and pollination that are important f 
that environmental stress and ecosystem degradation is among the main drivers of the slowdown i 
d sustainability while decreasing their environmental impact and ecosystem degradation.  
heir environmental impact and ecosystem degradation.  
10123 4 h is an understanding of the effects of climate change on landscape dynamics and the population 
 these models to predict the effects of climate change and gas exploration on rangeland conditi 
d saiga distribution and to explore the impacts of potential biodiversity offsets. - to analyse 
c programme. it examines the effects of climate change and human activities on a migratory spec 
10314 2  the genetic alterations in response to climate change is unclear. moreover, much understanding 
nk between two divisive public issues - climate change and evolution - that can be used to addr 
12743 1 ilt environment can have in adapting to climate change. •sign post all relevant guidance on the 
11084 1 restoration in relation to land use and climate change. the project develops a pilot study has  
11489 3 mates of the timing and duration of the drought events. the relative timing of these events in  
 the global- scale mechanisms of abrupt climate change. the data can also be used to test clima 
 the accuracy of model-predicted abrupt climate change in the future. a long core record of pas 
11518 3 mates of the timing and duration of the drought events. the relative timing of these events in  
 the global- scale mechanisms of abrupt climate change. the data can also be used to test clima 
 the accuracy of model-predicted abrupt climate change in the future. a long core record of pas 
14935 1 ades in sediments, and consequently the risk of poisoning remains present. several studies have 
14809 4 logical conservation standpoint, global climate change has come to accelerate the rate of destr 
e brought many endemics to the verge of extinction. the study of the past effect of climatic ch 
may shade light on the future impact of global warming on current ecosystems and can help to pr 
nsidered to have promoted speciation by fragmentation of distributional ranges and subsequent d 
14856 1 aluation on the impact of anthropogenic environmental impact on wild areas and habitats. additi 
14155 1 e conservation as it is associated with species loss. considering that vast majority of the pla 
2010 2 both features conceivably increases the vulnerability of exploited fish stocks to catastrophic  
 fish stocks increase or decrease their vulnerability to catastrophic collapses 2. is it possib 
13926 1  importance of size-dependent predation risk during the larval stage. with a combination of met 
10866 1 re investment in immunity due to higher risk and severity of pathogens. i propose that this tra 
15396 20                               actually, climate change and habitat fragmentation are considered 
           actually, climate change and habitat fragmentation are considered the most important 
he potential synergetic effects between climate change and habitat fragmentation. at the southe 
etic effects between climate change and habitat fragmentation. at the southern edge of the spec 
 poleward or up hill is also limited by habitat fragmentation, extinction rates will increase.  
 also limited by habitat fragmentation, extinction rates will increase. do species respond to c 
es will increase. do species respond to climate change by genetic or physiological adaptations, 
in areas with relatively high levels of habitat fragmentation and low levels of spatial cohesio 
 spatial cohesion. species responses to climate change will be influenced by the spatial config 
e, to understand the potential risks of climate change to a species, we must consider the dynam 
the spatial features of the landscapes. habitat fragmentation have negative effects on populati 
een loss of genetic variability, due to habitat fragmentation, and reduced mean fitness is stil 
pulations is the food chain affected by climate change in synergy with the fragmentation procce 
d by climate change in synergy with the fragmentation proccess these are the type of questions  
 warming. 2. to determine the effect of habitat fragmentation on genetic diversity of insectivo 
c diversity of insectivorous birds in a climate change scenario. 3. to determine the effect of  
scenario. 3. to determine the effect of habitat fragmentation on population genetic differentia 
erentiation of insectivorous birds in a climate change scenario. to explore the potential syner 
he potential synergetic effects between climate change and habitat fragmentation.  
etic effects between climate change and habitat fragmentation.  
12228 4                 globally and in the uk, weeds cause greater yield losses than any other crop pe 
ly technology-led and focus on removing weeds from the crop sometimes resulting in negative env 
vironmental, ecosystem and human health impacts. cultural weed management, on the other hand, i 
cally-driven and attempts to limit weed impacts by reducing weed establishment in crops, maximi 
9864 1  there such an extensive lag before the invasion of the land by complex multicellular organisms 
13344 1 necessary preparations in the domain of risk management and quality control. the project is pla 
14720 2 ns and technological improvement on the introduced species response. from that evaluation, simp 
a pilot demonstration project to combat desertification. the proposal focuses on mediterranean  
2485 3 ery year and billions of people live in risk areas. in the southeast asian region both diseases 
 of stored household water for the dual risk of diarrhea and dengue. the aim of this interdisci 
ill assist in development of integrated disease control strategies appropriate for the southeas 
7194 1 ogy of microbial actors involved in the degradation of the mos. more precisely, the objective o 
10118 2  subsidies e.g. emergent insects. thus, climate change impacts on saline lakes via fluctuating  
 emergent insects. thus, climate change impacts on saline lakes via fluctuating volume and sali 
13868 3 project is to be able to understand how climate change may affect the timing and duration of th 
e against increasing nutrient loads and climate change; changes that may otherwise turn the lak 
temperate coastal lakes will respond to global warming has been debated in recent years. i will 
15127 2                                   under climate change scenario, average atmospheric and sea su 
on. despite it is generally agreed that climate change determine how the interacting effect of  
14281 2                                         habitat loss and fragmentation, associated with land co 
                       habitat loss and fragmentation, associated with land conversion for huma 
478 1 c diversity, playing a decisive role in climate change mitigation through adaptation. the effic 
14137 3 factors including construction of dams, pollution and over-fishing. during recent years, there  
 increased pathogen load as a result of global warming, as several dangerous salmonid parasites 
yosalmonae causing proliferative kidney disease compare the spatial patterns of genetic variabi 
10085 1 the forest and driving other species to extinction. one possibility is that differences in frui 
2023 2 nge of coastal marine sediments. carbon degradation in sediments covers the most important biog 
cus will be on bacteria involved in the degradation of different classes of organic substrates  
15439 2 etic structure of the adult population. habitat loss and fragmentation may determine the compos 
 the adult population. habitat loss and fragmentation may determine the composition and behavio 
2044 1 f ecological systems in order to assess human impacts. hitherto measures of structural diversit 
15104 1 odplains of large regulated rivers with impacts of global changes extensively across an habitat 
15570 1 c diversity, playing a decisive role in climate change mitigation through adaptation. the effic 
13345 2 main perspectives; biological diversity risk, socio economic ability and cultural perceptions t 
erceptions to cope with effects of this risk. working in a 15-year perspective, the scenarios w 
9957 3 nce of poor peoples to human and animal disease; and build capacity at all levels to ensure imp 
th particular emphasis on resilience to climate change. we in the south seek a ppd grant to ena 
s including the running of new regional climate change and land surface models with political s 
15268 1 xamine the capacity of reptiles to face climate change in mountain systems. the concrete object 
7406 1 nt to start a reflection face of future climate change, particularly in the context of contrast 
7709 1 and communities and their adaptation to drought, agronomists and animal scientists and research 
10148 2 nges are generally attributed to recent global warming, the effects of which are enhanced in th 
ational focus on long-range atmospheric pollution transport. finally, these modern studies will 
10418 1 anging. this is generally attributed to global warming, effects of which are particularly enhan 
10908 2 nges are generally attributed to recent global warming, the effects of which are enhanced in th 
ational focus on long-range atmospheric pollution transport. finally, these modern studies will 
11751 2 nges are generally attributed to recent global warming, the effects of which are enhanced in th 
ational focus on long-range atmospheric pollution transport. finally, these modern studies will 
11742 1 study is to determine the effect of oil pollution on the population dynamics of the common guil 
12165 2                                    many weeds associated with arable systems have declined subs 
f uncommon arable plants and pernicious weeds. proposals will be made for weed control treatmen 
2101 4 official requirement to avoid long term environmental impacts or effects that may be in conflic 
 the fisheries. the knowledge about the environmental impact of such activities in these region 
 events or its associated environmental risk, so a scenario based approach is used to identify  
e relevant for validation of hazard and risk estimates as well as a support for environmentally 
11849 9 onment. they also store vast amounts of greenhouse gases in their trees and soils. the brazilia 
s. human activities such as logging and forest fragmentation open up the forest habitat and mak 
est has greatly increased the number of fire incidents. furthermore, there is now convincing ev 
 the frequency and intensity of extreme drought events and raising the flammability of enormous 
heights rarely exceed 30-40 cm, and the fire moves through the leaf litter. although these fire 
creasing the severity of any subsequent fire. forests that have burned more than once have lost 
formation on the longer-term effects of fire on tropical forest trees. we need more information 
t tree mortality and regeneration after fire in transitional and core amazonian forests. this i 
 potential consequences of land-use and climate change.  
12065 2 . thereby"biodiversity crisis"and"sixth extinction"are expressions that are based on evidence i 
ct aims to quantify losers contemporary extinction on a group of invertebrates, and offer the t 
226 9                                         habitat loss and habitat fragmentation are considered t 
                       habitat loss and habitat fragmentation are considered to be the primary  
ons. this creates the phenomenon called extinction debt in communities which means that many po 
uitable for them anymore and the future extinction is inevitable. the aim of this grant proposa 
 of this grant proposal is to study the extinction debt as wide-spread phenomenon in recently f 
ty, phylogenetic diversity – respond to habitat loss and fragmentation and how they are related 
diversity – respond to habitat loss and fragmentation and how they are related to the extinctio 
ntation and how they are related to the extinction debt. finally, by comparing the remained are 
ing the remained area, connectivity and extinction debt in different studies we will give a gen 
13804 1 sult pollination interactions may be at risk. the impact of pollinator loss on plant communitie 
12282 1 e pool will be discussed. the impact of climate change and the effects of predicted changes in  
7046 3 rical context - on the issue-complex of climate change, eutrophication and biodiversity loss. o 
on the issue-complex of climate change, eutrophication and biodiversity loss. our multidiscipli 
x of climate change, eutrophication and biodiversity loss. our multidisciplinary results will b 
7181 3 to monitor some protected areas but the risk appears limited impact outside of disturbed areas. 
e new knowledge about the mechanisms of invasion groundsel. the species does not appear as a sp 
changes that appear to have favored the invasion  
13327 10 eta-analyse the existing projections of climate change impacts on biodiversity. it will assess  
 existing projections of climate change impacts on biodiversity. it will assess the available o 
ptions to prevent and minimise negative impacts for the eu25 up to 2050 and review the state-of 
n methods to assess the probable future impacts of climate change on biodiversity. this include 
o assess the probable future impacts of climate change on biodiversity. this includes the revie 
y. this includes the review of possible climate change adaptation and mitigation measures and t 
abitat models that address biodiversity impacts, and are capable of calculating the consequence 
levels to prevent and minimise negative impacts from climate change and from climate change ada 
vent and minimise negative impacts from climate change and from climate change adaptation and m 
ve impacts from climate change and from climate change adaptation and mitigation measures.  
2197 1 lluscs as well as fouling on ships. the risk that some of these algae or vascular plants may po 
11059 8 ows that there have been times when the risk of extinction has been particularly high. however, 
 there have been times when the risk of extinction has been particularly high. however, it has  
t which species are formed, the rate of extinction, or both. nor can they give us direct inform 
ution. how have rates of speciation and extinction changed through the last 65 million years do 
gh diversity suppress speciation, cause extinction, neither, or both do individual species prob 
logical characters shape speciation and extinction rates does the tendency towards larger size  
ges, or does size affect speciation and extinction rates too how do morphological characters ev 
 are there different sets of rules when extinction rates are high, as opposed to normal; or whe 
11304 8 ows that there have been times when the risk of extinction has been particularly high. however, 
 there have been times when the risk of extinction has been particularly high. however, it has  
t which species are formed, the rate of extinction, or both. nor can they give us direct inform 
ution. how have rates of speciation and extinction changed through the last 65 million years do 
gh diversity suppress speciation, cause extinction, neither, or both do individual species prob 
logical characters shape speciation and extinction rates does the tendency towards larger size  
ges, or does size affect speciation and extinction rates too how do morphological characters ev 
 are there different sets of rules when extinction rates are high, as opposed to normal; or whe 
7163 1 sms invasive processes and characterize invasive species as well as the most invaded areas. the 
10716 1 model how environmental changes such as climate change alter the balance of these processes.  
11704 1 model how environmental changes such as climate change alter the balance of these processes.  
10854 1  used in the control of insect vectored disease. we propose to investigate one wolbachia phenot 
11686 1 ve altered due to human interference or climate change. tetraploids often have different charac 
15275 2 omestic animals and wild species on the risk of extinction are spatially structured. thus, meth 
animals and wild species on the risk of extinction are spatially structured. thus, methods for  
15276 2 omestic animals and wild species on the risk of extinction are spatially structured. thus, meth 
animals and wild species on the risk of extinction are spatially structured. thus, methods for  
14632 3 d will explore possible consequences of habitat fragmentation on population genetics of the spe 
in mediterranean wetlands. the loss and fragmentation of habitat may affect resource availabili 
vicariance and more recent events, like habitat fragmentation or dispersal to the genetic struc 
7617 3 d and are still at work are mainly: the fire that is an essential component to explain the comp 
nforcements of extreme events including drought. these processes have generated forest formatio 
juvenated by disturbances, including an erosion of species diversity, an under representation o 
12526 2 nd handling of plant produce generate a risk of introduction or spread of plant pests and patho 
ment of biowaste with high plant health risk. the use of temperature sensitive materials and ot 
12156 1  have been associated with the loss and degradation of breeding habitat mainly through changes  
2210 1 o identify areas with particularly high risk of being negatively affected , and to explore how  
13715 2 blooms are a main problem of baltic sea eutrophication, and a common argument against reducing  
m. blooms are toxic and increase baltic eutrophication by fixing 200-400 kton nitrogen/yr. they 
10902 2 h dependency on one commodity increases vulnerability to fluctuating prices and other market ri 
africa are managed now and under future climate change so that the income farmers receive is in 
10986 2 h dependency on one commodity increases vulnerability to fluctuating prices and other market ri 
africa are managed now and under future climate change so that the income farmers receive is in 
11231 1                       deforestation and land degradation contribute significantly to human-indu 
13718 3 standing the causes and consequences of degradation of the marine environment have failed. alth 
rients to lessen the harmful effects of eutrophication, marine ecosystems are not responding as 
n land-use changes nutrient enrichment, eutrophication, and climate. we will contribute to deve 
10276 1  may play an important role in avoiding eutrophication, particularly in coastal areas. similarl 
1923 1 ent plant and animal species have major impacts upon ecosystem processes. thus, changes in biod 
10732 4                                  global climate change and the large-scale loss of the tropical 
treme drying. in the event of increased drought frequency in the amazon region, the leakage of  
nted by combining information about the fire classes and empirically-calibrated relationships b 
elease and the net balance of carbon in fire-affected forest sites in recent years, to quantify 
10810 4                                  global climate change and the large-scale loss of the tropical 
treme drying. in the event of increased drought frequency in the amazon region, the leakage of  
nted by combining information about the fire classes and empirically-calibrated relationships b 
elease and the net balance of carbon in fire-affected forest sites in recent years, to quantify 
10987 3 ople who depend upon them modelling the impacts of changes to the ecosystem upon the population 
n dependant upon its services including climate change developing practical responses to both e 
d potential problems, aimed at reducing impacts upon the ecosystem and alleviating poverty and  
12673 1 or the management of their biodiversity impacts. this work was a preliminary assessment of avai 
13328 1 and how marine ecosystems will adapt to climate change, we need addressing especially the long- 
13573 1  particularly prone to be influenced by climate change because of its close connection with the 
10128 1  policy makers concerning the potential impacts of future environmental change.  
12437 1 y the impact that fishing has on marine biodiversity loss. there are indications that we are im 
2110 1 d aw masses in this high arctic region. climate change effects can be studied in kongsfjorden b 
7459 1 ill respond to combinations of multiple climate change and anthropogenic drivers. with an empha 
2178 3 ovide critical new understanding on the impacts of climate change on the structure and function 
cal new understanding on the impacts of climate change on the structure and functioning of mari 
m will assess how decadal to centennial climate change will promote ecosystem modifications due 
12381 1 bill, water framework directive, marine climate change impact partnership, uk marine monitoring 
10588 3 stability and resilience to predict the vulnerability and responses of populations to changes i 
 or under consideration, for predicting vulnerability to population declines and extinction. th 
ulnerability to population declines and extinction. this research should therefore lead to a be 
12573 1  stocks will respond and be affected by climate change.  
12431 1 astics’ differ in their potential ‘harm impacts.  
11042 2 anism, and its enzymes and genes of dms degradation will lead to understanding of the mechanism 
o understanding of the mechanism of dms degradation in an environmentally relevant marine organ 
12408 2        summary objectives: to determine impacts and benefits of large-scale marine renewable en 
nitude and extent of the consequences / impacts of wave energy extraction on ecosystem services 
10392 2 oastal environment s natural resources, impacts of contaminants and climate change, and, as des 
 resources, impacts of contaminants and climate change, and, as described above, all with an em 
2470 2 hange. drivers include those acting via climate change and variability as well as those acting  
ence and policy formulation in terms of risk management as suggested by the european science fo 
2469 3 ale that follows that predicted for the global warming, we are to expect local extinctions of t 
he north of their usual range and local extinction or decreases in abundance in cold temperate  
 populations and the rear edge near the extinction zone. indeed, although much insight has been 
10941 11 nds on what the animal considers is its risk of starvation or being eaten. in birds, how an ind 
ual views both starvation and predation risk is neatly measured by its weight. fat birds are un 
nd to find fatter birds when starvation risk is relatively important such as during the cold wi 
ficult and thinner birds when predation risk is relatively important such as when hawks are com 
e importance of starvation or predation risk simply from a measure of birds weight and how this 
ful because measuring either starvation risk or predation risk is complicated involving a lot o 
ing either starvation risk or predation risk is complicated involving a lot of detailed field m 
irds to assess starvation and predation risk and so draw conclusions about how they may be dete 
are suffering from increased starvation risk, leading to their population decline, then they sh 
se sparrows are under greater predation risk and this was confirmed because we found that weigh 
 importance of predation and starvation risk in determining house sparrow population decline. w 
7503 1  to develop the freezing of semen in an endangered species in france, goose. interspecific diff 
2467 1 ts. our main goal is to investigate the vulnerability of marine systems to environmental change 
11368 4    some of the clearest signs of global climate change are those associated with shifts in the  
es. our findings will help forecast the impacts of climate change on the north sea ecosystem an 
dings will help forecast the impacts of climate change on the north sea ecosystem and also be o 
ch areas: earth s life support systems, climate change and sustainable economies.  
10932 1 rategies by determining the ontogeny of disease resistance in the pups. effects on the female s 
10088 2  accurate models of the consequences of species loss or invasion on ecosystems to be constructe 
 of the consequences of species loss or invasion on ecosystems to be constructed.  
10224 2  accurate models of the consequences of species loss or invasion on ecosystems to be constructe 
 of the consequences of species loss or invasion on ecosystems to be constructed.  
2464 2 ecent change in pipefish habitat due to eutrophication and global warming, presumably affecting 
efish habitat due to eutrophication and global warming, presumably affecting both population de 
10048 2 o use habitats with increased predation risk. the second idea suggests that males and females m 
hat guppies living under high predation risk segregate by sex, with male guppies testing predic 
10226 2 o use habitats with increased predation risk. the second idea suggests that males and females m 
hat guppies living under high predation risk segregate by sex, with male guppies testing predic 
10896 5 flooding. the underlying causes of this degradation stem from the unsustainable use of the mari 
 have been many attempts to reverse the impacts of environmental degradation on the people who  
to reverse the impacts of environmental degradation on the people who are reliant on marine goo 
nd their interactions cause change. wp3 impacts and interactive effects of changes - will inves 
fects of changes - will investigate the impacts of the changes on the ecosystem, ecosystem serv 
1981 1 g the effects on biodiversity of global climate change, of which climatic warming is currently  
14129 11 wn in our lab that significant ribosome degradation in fact occurs in growing e. coli cells . t 
tion is to study mechanisms of ribosome degradation in bacteria. to this end we will measure ri 
a. to this end we will measure ribosome degradation in e. coli strains, which are defective in  
 with the hope of finding strains where degradation is reduced. direct measurment of ribosome d 
 reduced. direct measurment of ribosome degradation will be combined with northern analysis and 
agments that accumulate during ribosome degradation. in addition, we will test different toxins 
i genome for possible roles in ribosome degradation. by using mutagenesis of ribosmal rna we wi 
try to determine what triggers ribosome degradation. we will also study the possible role of ri 
lso study the possible role of ribosome degradation in the mechanisms of growth inhibition of v 
tics. we will determine the kinetics of degradation of various ribosomal proteins upon ribosome 
arious ribosomal proteins upon ribosome degradation using a mass-spectroscopy based approach.  
7124 1  is increasingly clear that the current global warming influences ecosystems and, in particular 
15132 1 nd test novel approaches to incorporate vulnerability traits into population assessment tools.  
14834 3 r in this proposal project we implement fire effects on soil microbiology, as well as we want t 
e in the decisions about restoration of wildfire affected areas, and therefore to assist in how 
d therefore to assist in how to use the fire as a fuel management tool.  
14835 3 r in this proposal project we implement fire effects on soil microbiology, as well as we want t 
e in the decisions about restoration of wildfire affected areas, and therefore to assist in how 
d therefore to assist in how to use the fire as a fuel management tool.  
11603 2 rning will be evaluated alongside other disturbance factors including storms, floods and faunal 
able us to identify the extent to which disturbance is event related, the return period of even 
11146 3 ssed in the biofilm and responsible for degradation of the cellulose substrate. this first desc 
genes responsible for adsorption to and degradation of cellulose, and enabling the identificati 
f the species responsible for cellulose degradation in the natural aquatic and managed landfill 
14885 2 lant tolerance to high concentration of heavy metals. to test this idea, we will design experim 
esistant to high level concentration of heavy metals and rhizosphere microorganisms from our sa 
12591 1 ic materials and to determine the local impacts of changing the maximum permissible soil metal  
10019 7                                         habitat loss and climate change together represent a gr 
                       habitat loss and climate change together represent a great threat to bio 
n combination. the complication is that climate change itself alters habitat quality and quanti 
ble projections of species responses to climate change can be made. we will develop a new appro 
pecies distributions as they respond to climate change, and the importance of climate, habitat  
on actions can alleviate the effects of climate change on biodiversity, and which actions are m 
his process of adapting conservation to climate change. we will make the software that we devel 
11572 7                                         habitat loss and climate change together represent a gr 
                       habitat loss and climate change together represent a great threat to bio 
n combination. the complication is that climate change itself alters habitat quality and quanti 
ble projections of species responses to climate change can be made. we will develop a new appro 
pecies distributions as they respond to climate change, and the importance of climate, habitat  
on actions can alleviate the effects of climate change on biodiversity, and which actions are m 
his process of adapting conservation to climate change. we will make the software that we devel 
13772 4           from data on colonisation and extinction rates it is possible to predict current and  
ible. methods to interpret colonisation-extinction dynamics from snapshot studies have been dev 
lity obviously affects the colonisation-extinction dynamics; species in recently dead trees col 
 be used to parameterise a colonisation-extinction model - the incidence function model - and m 
13938 2  to airborne microorganisms which makes risk assessments practically impossible. this project i 
asic science and for the performance of risk analysis related to airborne transfer of microorga 
10633 1 c organisms also have a role to play in disease in pulmonary exacerbations  
14936 2  change in climate, could result in the extinction of the microbiota. in this project, we inten 
 data in areas very sensitive to global climate change, such as deserts. finally, this multidis 
2486 1  a source for release of climate gases. degradation of organic carbon involves a consortium of  
12559 3 ancient plant material identified as at risk from the exotic/quarantine plant pathogens phytoph 
ross the uk and for a wider range of at-risk genera and species that may benefit from microprop 
o routinely process a wider range of at-risk plant material identified by individual gardens. a 
14169 5                                         disturbance regimes, and how climate change alters thes 
           disturbance regimes, and how climate change alters these, are of particular importan 
natural regeneration conditions in post-disturbance microsites. in established permanent sample 
 population dynamics and growth of post-disturbance and advance natural regeneration will be de 
n dynamics during a longer period since disturbance. in economic terms, the study is important  
1955 1  and hence the likelihood of decline to extinction. the model species used in this project is t 
14738 1 pact of threats such as longlining, oil pollution and off shore wind mills, which kill hundreds 
12520 1 ion about animal health and welfare and disease prevention in advisory systems and farmer group 
12061 2                                  global climate change and other human-induced pressures on the 
rder to be able to protect species from extinction, either by improving habitat quality or by f 
12021 1 by females: the presence of cubs, human disturbance, topography, vegetation. for buffaloes, the 
2003 2 he analysis of the long-term effects of climate change on bog ecosystems requires a model that  
ied to analyse the long-term effects of climate change on plant species composition and carbon  
10408 10 help fill knowledge gaps related to how climate change will impact provisioning and regulatory  
plement policy relevant research on the impacts of climate change on ecosystem services and rur 
icy relevant research on the impacts of climate change on ecosystem services and rural liveliho 
t cases, national economies, and are at risk of major disruption from climate change. these sit 
nd are at risk of major disruption from climate change. these sites include the great ruaha riv 
esearch program to assess the impact of climate change on ecosystem services provision and loca 
rchers with the skills needed to assess climate change impacts on ecosystem services and rural  
 skills needed to assess climate change impacts on ecosystem services and rural livelihoods for 
l, economic and social shocks linked to climate change. as a result of this proposed program, o 
ons will be better prepared to adapt to climate change and to manage ecosystem services for the 
11413 10 help fill knowledge gaps related to how climate change will impact provisioning and regulatory  
plement policy relevant research on the impacts of climate change on ecosystem services and rur 
icy relevant research on the impacts of climate change on ecosystem services and rural liveliho 
t cases, national economies, and are at risk of major disruption from climate change. these sit 
nd are at risk of major disruption from climate change. these sites include the great ruaha riv 
esearch program to assess the impact of climate change on ecosystem services provision and loca 
rchers with the skills needed to assess climate change impacts on ecosystem services and rural  
 skills needed to assess climate change impacts on ecosystem services and rural livelihoods for 
l, economic and social shocks linked to climate change. as a result of this proposed program, o 
ons will be better prepared to adapt to climate change and to manage ecosystem services for the 
10543 2 s model will be used to investigate the impacts of different management options on the individu 
scenario analysis to predict the likely impacts of these regimes on the spatial distribution of 
7277 3 omena that act synergistically to cause erosion of biodiversity in fish: global warming, invasi 
 cause erosion of biodiversity in fish: global warming, invasions of species and overfishing. i 
the mediterranean coast to counter this erosion and maintain resource sustainability. in this c 
11838 6  ~15% to the annual global carbon sink. climate change, particularly altered precipitation regi 
 welfare and economy, understanding the impacts of future environmental change on savannas is c 
asize tree-grass competition for water, fire-induced bottlenecks to tree establishment, and lar 
ffects of rainfall, soil properties and disturbance on savanna tree demography. specifically, w 
s changes across gradients of rainfall, fire and geomorphology. we will use these data to devel 
es the effects of spatial structure and disturbance on tree demography. we will use the model t 
15234 2 make a reconstruction of the historical eutrophication process, based on recent sedimentary seq 
lanctonic community before last century human impact. the modelization of the processs that reg 
13330 4 ective, and the impact of environmental pollution as causative factor, 4to provide methods for  
to provide methods for state-of-the-art risk assessment and decision support systems for the se 
d of impact assessment of environmental pollution on aquatic eco- systems and their biodiversit 
ffective tool selection and appropriate risk and site prioritisation.  
7676 1             in agricultural landscapes, weeds are the main constituent of wild plant biodiversi 
13972 3 turbidity and overgrowth of macroalgae. eutrophication is regarded as driving force in this pro 
stem that may work synergistically with eutrophication and result in decreased grazing and incr 
rrence of top predators in concert with eutrophication results in excess growth of macroalgae i 
2183 3 iting and exploiting ecosystems. hence, climate change is likely to have serious ecological, ec 
the world. to date, the consequences of climate change on lake fish communities are very poorly 
 strategies for natural resources under climate change.  
13771 2 ith slow dynamics. however, data on the fire history of the landscape is required. within the p 
pe is required. within the project, the fire history of the landscape is planned to be mapped.  
11614 1 hy is it so diverse and will it survive global warming to answer these questions we propose usi 
13763 1 ty in fragmented landscapes with a high human impact. the project applies for an open post-doc  
12593 5  the present day soil conditions. under climate change, the anticipated changes in temperature  
tter. this has the potential to enhance global warming, so is particularly important. an unders 
 of the specific changes expected under climate change. our existing knowledge is built into pr 
 in important soil properties under the climate change scenarios generated by ukcp09. these sce 
es in temperature and precipitation: 1. erosion 2. loss of soil organic matter 3. compaction 4. 
7681 2 mic response of fishing fleets, and the impacts on marine living communities. an interdisciplin 
rine fisheries systems, including their impacts on biodiversity.  
12359 1 he in-water-column dispersion of marine pollution such as could arise from a damaged container. 
12378 5 on and ospar to combat the threats that eutrophication poses to the marine environment. a key o 
ent. a key ospar objective is to combat eutrophication in the ospar maritime area in order to a 
ieve a healthy marine environment where eutrophication does not occur. the target date for achi 
uk caused a significant contribution to eutrophication problems in the oyster grounds and the g 
aries might contribute significantly to eutrophication problems in the waters of other countrie 
6967 1 ion ecology. they can form the basis of climate change modelling and can assist effective natur 
10493 7  nature of uk rivers. the potential for human impact on riverine nutrient and carbon fluxes by  
ter quality significance than projected climate change impacts. recent uk work has shown that g 
nificance than projected climate change impacts. recent uk work has shown that groundwater-domi 
tude of these influences with potential impacts of climate change over a sufficiently long peri 
se influences with potential impacts of climate change over a sufficiently long period. the pro 
will help to identify whether projected climate change impacts will be as big a threat to water 
entify whether projected climate change impacts will be as big a threat to water quality as lar 
14595 2 oaccumulation in trophic webs and their degradation or persistence in environment. the main obj 
ary producers 4. to study the bacterial degradation of microcystins  
7154 2 ace of global changes including climate risk, take into account uncertainty and arrival informa 
obal dynamics will be seen initially as impacts. this project builds on two application fields: 
12062 2 morocco suffers from moderate to severe degradation, notably of the forests. about 10% of its o 
 was the modern behaviour influenced by climate change and for recent periods, did modern human 
15423 1 tant acid ph and high concentrations of heavy metals. these unusual conditions along with the s 
11630 2  in the environment can check to see if disease is caused in fish and can look for possible pol 
rmful in fish before it is too late and disease occurs. in recent years there have been fantast 
11385 1 n hierarchies were subject to simulated drought or spate, rank 2 ended to lose its position to  
15078 2 l history of the gene susceptibility to disease and the biological history of human populations 
ist data on the evolutionary history of risk variants of the nos genes for cardiovascular and o 
6907 2 create new apple cultivars selected for disease resistance, fruit quality or tree growth charac 
fy tightly linked molecular markers for disease resistance genes. microsatellite markers are id 
10843 2 ecially important in the face of global climate change. perhaps the biggest impediment to unloc 
 remarkably successful for the study of disease-related genes in admixed human populations. the 
6811 1 of domestic animal breeds threatened by extinction.  
7304 1  conservation purposes, in a context of fragmentation of their habitat  
14101 1  of ahrr pro185ala in the modulation of disease susceptibility, including changes in spermatoge 
14210 1 is of crucial importance for developing drought resistant crops, which will be a lucrative init 
6777 1 nally thought of as a connective tissue disease. while a spectrum of mutations within the abcc6 
13708 1 ading to over-exploitation and resource degradation. unfortunately, observational data are ofte 
15392 2 anges in traditional land uses, and the global warming . a thorough exploratory study of the wh 
h future changes in biodiversity due to global warming will occur, depending on the responses o 
13814 1 cies and as refuges for pollinators and natural enemies of crop pests, and to evaluate the ecos 
7265 1 s between development, biodiversity and climate change; - mobilize naturalists local knowledge  
13358 1 al of this project is to determinate of drought tolerant and sensitive cowpea landraces by scre 
10864 2 nd term options: ecological management, pollution management, global environmental change polic 
bal environmental change policy, health risk assessment policy and management, water management 
536 2 pending on the location. this is due to introduced species but also to warming which favours ra 
h temperature, and the possible role of natural enemies to regulate abundant species is being d 
13974 2 ocontrol agent phlebiopsis gigantea and endangered species phlebia centrifuga, were occasionall 
ibute to our better understanding about human impact on fungal biodiversity in forest ecosystem 
1086 2 ism, hunting and fishing, together with habitat fragmentation, that modify both structure and g 
salvelinus alpinus. finally, effects of habitat fragmentation due to human action to achieve ta 
12483 1 lue of ecosystem services and potential impacts that takes data and model uncertainty into acco 
14527 1 ystems where the atmosphere is the only pollution source. recent results indicate that the kine 
11278 5 ems in this region, such as for example climate change impacts. this project will develop novel 
ion, such as for example climate change impacts. this project will develop novel statistical me 
quantify the different scale effects of eutrophication and climate change. the project will als 
ent scale effects of eutrophication and climate change. the project will also aim to quantify b 
ng the complex interactions of climate, eutrophication and plankton abundance. by combining the 
14362 5 ctor and pathogen distribution, for the disease to be transmitted to humans, there must be an o 
successful at mapping either vectors or disease cases. however, the knowledge that is currently 
vironmental factors dictating vector or disease distribution indicates that factors acting at m 
a with data from other sources, such as disease incidence. - a better understanding of the infl 
 diseases, carried by the main european disease vector, the tick. other significant outcomes of 
542 2 indicates widespread bottlenecks during fragmentation and expansion. alternate contraction and  
tualisms, as ants were more affected by climate change than plants. preliminary results of expe 
15371 1 on eggs hatching success and on feather degradation. similar to subproject number one, this sub 
11096 1 ictions of how these forests respond to global warming, and influence the way that forest manag 
12201 6 , and make an essential contribution to risk analysis. risk analysis will therefore be based on 
ssential contribution to risk analysis. risk analysis will therefore be based on completed epid 
velop models that will assess long-term risk, the risk of mycotoxin contamination of grain prod 
ls that will assess long-term risk, the risk of mycotoxin contamination of grain produced in th 
 grain produced in the current year, or risk of severe disease in the current or following seas 
 in the current year, or risk of severe disease in the current or following seasons crops. this 
11579 1  to the environment for the clean up of pollution is an emerging technology. at the forefront i 
15063 1  and philopatry are basic components in invasion and colonization patterns, and in the genetic  
13887 2 resistance change over time. initially, invasive species may reach very high population densiti 
itude of negative ecological effects of invasive species. despite this, little is known about h 
12144 12 aim of this project is to determine the vulnerability of the native species and forest stand pr 
stand productivity in the conditions of biological invasions and climate change, and offer cost 
 conditions of biological invasions and climate change, and offer cost-based measures for fores 
project will identify the impact of the biological invasions and intensive spreading of the spe 
tensive spreading of the species to the vulnerability, productivity and structure of forest sta 
these changes. the potential effects of climate change on the populations of native tree growth 
ndition, the frequency, periodicity and risk of the main forest tree species vulnerability due  
nd risk of the main forest tree species vulnerability due to the biological invasions and clima 
t tree species vulnerability due to the biological invasions and climate change will be assesse 
ity due to the biological invasions and climate change will be assessed. after the completion o 
nd more sustainable condition stands on climate change and biological invasions conditions.  
 condition stands on climate change and biological invasions conditions.  
6849 1 nteractions it will allow us generating disease-tolerant grapevine plants using either traditio 
14452 1              nowadays the environmental risk assessment in model insects and small mammalians w 
10367 1 ecosystems and how they survived global extinction events.  
12242 4 t greenhouse gas emissions, and diffuse pollution of waterways have strengthened the need for f 
des a source of genes for adaptation to climate change. forage grasses, especially perennial ry 
ial ryegrass, and legumes adaptation to climate change through enhanced water use efficiency. t 
sed water use efficiency under times of drought. the exploitation of our developing understandi 
11560 2  significance for overall productivity. climate change is likely to increase stratification in  
e north sea and we will also assess the impacts of such changes on phytoplankton productivity a 
14498 2 iods with high irradiance combined with drought or low temperatures. the imbalance between ligh 
m-oak regeneration by resprouting after fire.  
13936 2                during the 20th century, eutrophication of the baltic sea has increased signific 
fine our understanding of the effect of eutrophication on the nitrogen-fixation activity and he 
2071 3  raised. these plantations have several impacts on local biodiversity and landscape, especially 
c parts of norway. different degrees of disturbance will be included in the experiment. the pro 
anges that follow an introduction of an alien species. the project is a collaboration between n 
2108 2 e ecosystem response to possible future climate change and its possible economic impact. the pr 
eanography of the barents sea and their impacts on the ecosystem. this will include a combinati 
2156 1 objective approach to evaluation of the endangered species status for the new editions of the n 
12313 2 l benefit of minimising or removing the risk of food-web residue contamination and minimising t 
esidue contamination and minimising the risk of secondary poisoning of non-target species. the  
12402 4               summary objective: the uk ocean acidification programme is a programme of researc 
tem, and to understand the responses to ocean acidification and other climate change related st 
ponses to ocean acidification and other climate change related stressors by marine organisms, b 
ible size and timescale of the risks of ocean acidification to allow for development of appropr 
13776 4 ~ 0.4 units lower than at present . the impacts of this change have barely begun to be understo 
sceptible. this project will assess the impacts of an up to 0.4 ph unit decrease in ocean ph on 
tion of predictive models regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the resilience, dynam 
dictive models regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the resilience, dynamics and int 
10894 3 atmosphere is a greenhouse gas, causing global warming; co2 entering the sea makes it more acid 
e changing chemistry of seawater due to ocean acidification is mostly well understood and not s 
 ta for other research groups in the uk ocean acidification programme who lack the appropriate  
10003 5 atmosphere is a greenhouse gas, causing global warming; co2 entering the sea makes it more acid 
e changing chemistry of seawater due to ocean acidification is mostly well understood and not s 
s, and the life within, will respond to ocean acidification. most of what we know about biologi 
. most of what we know about biological impacts, and the source of the current concern about th 
future response of the surface ocean to ocean acidification. in order to carry out this experim 
10153 5 atmosphere is a greenhouse gas, causing global warming; co2 entering the sea makes it more acid 
e changing chemistry of seawater due to ocean acidification is mostly well understood and not s 
s, and the life within, will respond to ocean acidification. most of what we know about biologi 
. most of what we know about biological impacts, and the source of the current concern about th 
future response of the surface ocean to ocean acidification. in order to carry out this experim 
11687 5 atmosphere is a greenhouse gas, causing global warming; co2 entering the sea makes it more acid 
e changing chemistry of seawater due to ocean acidification is mostly well understood and not s 
s, and the life within, will respond to ocean acidification. most of what we know about biologi 
. most of what we know about biological impacts, and the source of the current concern about th 
future response of the surface ocean to ocean acidification. in order to carry out this experim 
14987 8                                     the invasion of alloctonous species is considered as one of 
of the system as a whole. nowadays, the invasion of species and its consequences on marine syst 
icular interest within the framework of global warming given that the changes induced by human  
therefore, the study of the dynamics of invasive species, their interaccions with other key org 
how this can be affected by the gradual global warming are key tools towards conservation of bi 
y. the project propose the study of the invasive species oculina patagonica aspects of its auto 
tribute to determine the impact of this invasive species on natural and human altered communiti 
potential methods for mitigation of the impacts and to provide elements of judgement for the ma 
7303 1 ican and lizard ruins, recently arrived invasive species on the island. a second part concerns  
6768 1 rrestrial biodiversity caused mainly by human impact is being recorded. one of the most suitabl 
15421 1 een predicted that, as a consequence of global warming, the distribution area of sandflies and  
2058 1 understand the possible consequences of climate change to biotic systems.  
12451 1 and to use this data to investigate how climate change and fishing have impacted the distributi 
15211 1  biomarkers for detecting and assessing pollution levels in freshwater ecosystems. in order to  
7544 2              basal stem rot is a fungal disease from land causing serious damage to oil palm in 
ant track to contain the impact of this disease. . therefore it is particularly important to de 
12616 2 nerations. remediation removes negative impacts and leads to benefits for society. potential be 
e methodology needs to address economic impacts such as the impact on neighbouring house prices 
188 3 ted to give new knowledge to understand eutrophication processes of shallow eutrophic lakes. st 
yses are timely both from the aspect of eutrophication and climate change impact analyses. few  
h from the aspect of eutrophication and climate change impact analyses. few studies have been d 
14872 3 le regulation and their consequences on climate change. land use and soil management influence  
occur in forest ecosystems involve soil degradation that can be reversible. the use of organic  
from a land reclamation experience of a fire-declined area by vegetation cover establishment an 
10322 1 e proposed combination has far reaching impacts in further understanding the successful radiati 
10000 1 icroenvironments with greater levels of disturbance and higher fertility.  
12394 3  objective: to coordinate and draft the climate change contribution for the ospar qsr in 2010.  
uction of section 3.1 of the ospar qsr `impacts of climate change on the north-east atlantic ec 
ection 3.1 of the ospar qsr `impacts of climate change on the north-east atlantic ecosystem`, l 
11843 5 ematic and are held responsible for the extinction or catastrophic declines of some native spec 
by actively removing individuals of the invasive species. removing the last individual however  
necessary to continue controlling those invasive species for the foreseeable future. this is ex 
conservationists learn to control those alien species as effectively as possible, so that the n 
e likelihood of species not causing the extinction of other species. ecologists now realise tha 
13481 2  occurrence of a serious reproductional disturbance in baltic fish know as m74: oxidative stres 
ge-scale environmental changes, notably eutrophication. in 2006-2008 we will study mechanisms a 
12531 2 echniques to measure the development of disease on rhododendron plants infected with either p.  
m or p. kernoviae. data on inoculum and disease levels will be analysed in relation to seasonal 
14757 4 the construction of models of taxonomic extinction, the study of the origin and long-term dynam 
omponent of models for the survival and extinction of hominids in the iberian peninsula. a cruc 
el that give to inertia, resilience and vulnerability of terrestrial ecosystems an adequate rol 
historical processes including episodic disturbance. the possible causal links between ecologic 
7149 1  registration of old data is subject to degradation indices markers of the environment due to a 
10219 3 r climatic changes were involved in the extinction of homo floresiensis whether the extinction  
nction of homo floresiensis whether the extinction of homo floresiensis coincided with substant 
 points may have been needed to trigger extinction.  
10905 3 r climatic changes were involved in the extinction of homo floresiensis whether the extinction  
nction of homo floresiensis whether the extinction of homo floresiensis coincided with substant 
 points may have been needed to trigger extinction.  
7450 1 g of the species contributes to genetic erosion of its populations, and whether extraction can  
13346 1 g of the species contributes to genetic erosion of its populations, and whether extraction can  
12070 2 ses in habitats, and services , and the global warming. the fact that a lot of coastal dinoflag 
 sediment is an inflating parameter: an invasive species becoming rapidly a recurrent problem i 
15145 1  in the case of ecosystems perturbed by fire, constitute the main objectives of the present pro 
10985 1 semi-quantitative models to explore the impacts of scenarios on es and wellbeing of particular  
10782 1 ion of phytoplanktonic activity, and of ocean acidification for the uk shelf seas.  
11318 1 ion of phytoplanktonic activity, and of ocean acidification for the uk shelf seas.  
13841 2 ain the effects on species diversity of fragmentation, landuse change and habitat loss in grass 
ty of fragmentation, landuse change and habitat loss in grassland and small grassland habitats. 
10265 4                  since the discovery of fire and the development of agriculture, humans have be 
om laboratory experiments it seems that ocean acidification will affect marine organisms, parti 
ce, dwarfism, or reduced activity, with impacts further the ecosystem. unrestricted industrial  
rine organisms will be able to adapt to ocean acidification. by the time we know the answer, it 
10791 4                  since the discovery of fire and the development of agriculture, humans have be 
om laboratory experiments it seems that ocean acidification will affect marine organisms, parti 
ce, dwarfism, or reduced activity, with impacts further the ecosystem. unrestricted industrial  
rine organisms will be able to adapt to ocean acidification. by the time we know the answer, it 
2187 1 first, we investigate the occurrence of extinction thresholds, i.e. abrupt declines in patch oc 
6730 1     the proposed research will focus on disease-causing genomic mutations of the vhl, men2, nf- 
2048 1  process with environmental and fishery impacts, and explaining the differences between the var 
14164 3 he earth. the possible impact of global climate change on oceanographic conditions brings atten 
n primary production, and the impact of eutrophication or consumer-mediated facilitation on pri 
erstand and predict the consequences of eutrophication or community changes at different hydrol 
15387 1 f amphibian species are threatened with extinction. we will test whether rates of phenotypic ev 
14938 2  under different scenarios of landscape fragmentation. the proposal is designed to understand t 
ionary potential for coping with global climate change, and to help in designing appropriate ma 
11111 1 n economically important traits such as disease resistance in crops or insecticide resistance i 
9837 1 n economically important traits such as disease resistance in crops or insecticide resistance i 
10409 20  across europe are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and secondly, to develop  
 are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and secondly, to develop meaningful ind 
ly, to develop meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe 
 meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe are major glo 
 support a unique biological community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the 
gical community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the structure and function 
 of europe. there is also evidence that climate change will disturb peatland hydrology, through 
d how the combined stresses of nitrogen pollution and changing climate will affect biodiversity 
ream-water and rising concentrations of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. we anticip 
at these negative responses to nitrogen pollution will worsen under climate change due to incre 
to nitrogen pollution will worsen under climate change due to increased microbial activity seen 
ure of the interaction between nitrogen pollution and climate on peatland biodiversity and biog 
 and how these are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding w 
 are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding will help us de 
 will help us develop bio-indicators of risk to peatland ecology and functional integrity cause 
sed by elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change. for example, we will be able to better  
, we will be able to better account for climate change in the setting of nitrogen critical load 
ly, assess more accurately how nitrogen pollution affects the vulnerability of peatlands to spe 
tely how nitrogen pollution affects the vulnerability of peatlands to specific degrees of warmi 
 specific degrees of warming and summer drought. this is the first study investigating the inte 
13611 15  across europe are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful 
 are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful indicators of 
and to develop meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe 
 meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe are major glo 
 support a unique biological community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the 
gical community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the structure and function 
 of europe. there is also evidence that climate change will disturb peatland hydrology through  
l solution and rising concentrations of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. we anticip 
cipate that these responses to nitrogen pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, 
pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, and under extreme conditions may lead t 
re of the interactions between nitrogen pollution and climate on peatland biodiversity and biog 
 and how these are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding w 
 are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding will help us to 
ll help us to develop bio-indicators of risk to peatland ecology and functional integrity cause 
sed by elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change. on a national and european scale, this  
15571 15  across europe are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful 
 are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful indicators of 
and to develop meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe 
 meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe are major glo 
 support a unique biological community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the 
gical community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the structure and function 
 of europe. there is also evidence that climate change will disturb peatland hydrology through  
l solution and rising concentrations of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. we anticip 
cipate that these responses to nitrogen pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, 
pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, and under extreme conditions may lead t 
re of the interactions between nitrogen pollution and climate on peatland biodiversity and biog 
 and how these are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding w 
 are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding will help us to 
ll help us to develop bio-indicators of risk to peatland ecology and functional integrity cause 
sed by elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change. on a national and european scale, this  
12376 1 he contribution of uk nutrients towards eutrophication in remote areas cannot be shown to be in 
15220 1  when and where seabirds are exposed to human impacts. tracking the movements of pelagic seabir 
12535 1 er states where pepmv poses a potential risk. adoption of the new pra will allow eu plant healt 
15358 1 namics of species in response to modern climate change are likely to be determined largely by p 
457 1 tems, source of biodiversity or even as pollution buffer has been proved in other regions. more 
7208 1 eaks phenological timing in response to climate change. the experimental device used, as well a 
2083 1   an immediate and observable effect of global warming in norway is a transition in the seasona 
14953 1 ch effort make owing to the problems of eutrophication. in addition to its central role in lake 
10301 1               reducing diffuse nutrient pollution is a prime focus of measures to improve the e 
15454 1 rbon balance as well as its response to climate change. the aim of this project is to tackle so 
14767 3 oject may be also useful to predict the impacts of climate change. we hypothesize that in a sea 
e also useful to predict the impacts of climate change. we hypothesize that in a seasonal clima 
s must increase with leaf longevity. if climate change leads to variations in the strength of t 
10811 1 ll respond to perturbations such as the invasion by a new species and design experiments to tes 
10087 1 ial evolution, the origin and spread of disease, conservation biology, and the history of the m 
2477 1 lable it will generate new knowledge of human impacts on marine ecosystems particularly the sho 
2066 1 brid cladogenesis, and the interglacial invasion of fennoscandia. results of the project will f 
14648 2 s such as the expansion of agriculture, habitat fragmentation or global warming have determined 
f agriculture, habitat fragmentation or global warming have determined the demography and, thus 
15329 1 ful studies that examine the effects of habitat fragmentation and connectivity. we will check w 
12060 1 lenge of both rapid climatic change and biodiversity loss as consequences of anthropogenic caus 
13453 1 ts we will test priority effects and if invasion sequence matters. this research has implicatio 
14503 2  of tropospheric ozone, contributing to pollution episodes and influencing the climate. the fun 
herbivorism and abiotic factors such as eutrophication. we will investigate the mechanisms by w 
14512 1 quatic systems coming from agricultural runoff, exerting their toxic action on non target photo 
12558 5 and species in the uk and cause serious disease on a wide range of garden shrubs found within h 
es for replanting in situations of high disease pressure. this research project will directly s 
directly support the defra phytophthora disease management programme for p. ramorum and p. kern 
ners and garden end-users, facilitating disease management. core outputs from the work will be  
ecommendations and practical guides for disease management and eradication action at outbreak s 
15203 3 ns, if they happen, are affected by the eutrophication gradient. it is essential to know to wha 
iorated environments, its viability and vulnerability faced with new conditions. this project a 
stablish the effect of uv radiation and pollution by nutrients on the plankton-submerged macrop 
14133 5 o simultaneous anthropogenic pressures: eutrophication and climate change. the predicted runoff 
ropogenic pressures: eutrophication and climate change. the predicted runoff changes in the bal 
ation and climate change. the predicted runoff changes in the baltic sea catchment area, due to 
n the baltic sea catchment area, due to climate change, imply decreasing surface salinities pot 
on. this trophic feed-back mechanism to eutrophication within the plankton food-web modifies th 
10381 1 cales to monitor the effects of the new pollution climate.  
11114 1 tocarpus gets infected by a fungus-like disease-causing organism called eurychasma. firstly, in 
14526 1                                         habitat fragmentation modifies the outcomes of plant-an 
14211 1 hreatened species and to combat harmful invasive species or deceases. the most prevalent theory 
15008 4                                     the climate change affects the functional biodiversity caus 
ioning of the plant communities and the vulnerability of the species. these processes are descr 
 functional characters that predict the climate change and can be used as ecological indicators 
biodiversity changes as a result of the climate change in sierra nevada . sierra nevada is the  
15506 4 genetic structure of plant communities. fire also stamps a genetic fingerprint on primary produ 
s proposal it is intended to survey the fire-induced shifts in the genomes, biogeochemical func 
ecular basis of adaptation to recurrent fire is essential for revealing evolutionary and ecolog 
g can be altered through the increasing wildfire frequency caused by temperature rise.  
12287 2 rotinia sclerotiorum causes sclerotinia disease on more than 400 plant species including both i 
in the uk, the incidence of sclerotinia disease is increasing in crops determine the frequency  
14212 2 search on the causes of invasiveness in introduced species suggests that the existence of commo 
nt species that naturally co-occur with invasive species in their native ranges show little res 
10549 1  new approaches to reduce the burden of disease in the community.  
11047 1  new approaches to reduce the burden of disease in the community.  
7682 2 y in mountainous zones. quantifying the impacts on biodiversity of particular farming practices 
pes manipulating farming treatments and drought levels to parameterize these trait-based models 
14662 9 operties relevant to soil resistance to erosion processes. these changes lead to positive feedb 
positive feedbacks that might result in desertification processes. considering these prediction 
rated rhythm of mediterranean ecosystem degradation, there is an urgent need to know the effect 
an urgent need to know the effects that climate change might have on ecosystems and their compo 
 the effects of the interaction between erosion and aridity on vegetation cover, floristic comp 
s resulting from the intensification of erosion and aridity, and to identify which species are  
on of species or plant types useful for erosion control in a scenario of climatic change. 3. to 
s in relation to the intensification of erosion and aridity and their interaction, in order to  
o restore degraded ecosystems and fight desertification by providing useful criteria for the se 
10292 1 ferences were critical for survival, or extinction. we will reconstruct the ecologies of the ex 
11086 1 ferences were critical for survival, or extinction. we will reconstruct the ecologies of the ex 
7475 1 led in seeking to address anthropogenic climate change by attempting to shift patterns of consu 
14849 1 studies related to the human origin air pollution, which is affecting to the population life qu 
14850 1 studies related to the human origin air pollution, which is affecting to the population life qu 
14851 1 studies related to the human origin air pollution, which is affecting to the population life qu 
15027 1 ctors in predicting the real outcome of fragmentation on population genetic diversity and struc 
15363 1 ong distance dispersal events after the extinction of the raven corvus corax 25 years ago. in t 
2067 1  diversity, stability and resilience to disturbance. currently, there is growing awareness of a 
11445 1 annot cope and are therefore faced with extinction. a recent theory by p.a. aigner, challenges  
475 15  across europe are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful 
 are impacted by nitrogen pollution and climate change, and to develop meaningful indicators of 
and to develop meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe 
 meaningful indicators of risk to these impacts. the peatlands of northern europe are major glo 
 support a unique biological community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the 
gical community. climate change and air pollution, however, threaten the structure and function 
 of europe. there is also evidence that climate change will disturb peatland hydrology through  
l solution and rising concentrations of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. we anticip 
cipate that these responses to nitrogen pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, 
pollution will become exacerbated under climate change, and under extreme conditions may lead t 
re of the interactions between nitrogen pollution and climate on peatland biodiversity and biog 
 and how these are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding w 
 are affected by nitrogen pollution and climate change. increased understanding will help us to 
ll help us to develop bio-indicators of risk to peatland ecology and functional integrity cause 
sed by elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change. on a national and european scale, this  
12028 1  domestication. polyploidy has profound impacts on biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem function 
11149 3 w effluent over one and two generations impacts the development of the testes and ovaries and c 
m rivers sites with different levels of pollution with oestrogenic wwtw effluent. ultimately, o 
ly improve the assessment of the health impacts of exposure to complex mixtures of chemical dis 
11696 3 w effluent over one and two generations impacts the development of the testes and ovaries and c 
m rivers sites with different levels of pollution with oestrogenic wwtw effluent. ultimately, o 
ly improve the assessment of the health impacts of exposure to complex mixtures of chemical dis 
15156 2 ted and real landscapes, with different fragmentation levels due to land use intensification. f 
 deepen our knowledge on the effects of habitat fragmentation on the viability of populations,  
13835 2 e in abundance in the initial stages of degradation of semi-natural grasslands. the aim is to s 
onditions or landscape changes, such as fragmentation, is of importance both in a general ecolo 
10297 1 poral autocorrelations, coincident with climate change. as such, it serves as a rare model syst 
13472 3 scape has experienced a loss of natural disturbance processes and current management recognizes 
 focus wood fungi confined to burned or fire-influenced dead pines. their occurrence is tempora 
 during the initial stages after forest fire; ii fungal spore availability in different landsca 
11392 1 nutrients, decompose waste and clean up pollution. of course, some of them also make us ill or  
13746 2 in assessing population persistence and extinction risk for a threatened species.  
g population persistence and extinction risk for a threatened species.  
11709 2 ntinuing exploitation and the uncertain impacts of climate change are adding further pressures  
ploitation and the uncertain impacts of climate change are adding further pressures on fish res 
10028 2 ntinuing exploitation and the uncertain impacts of climate change are adding further pressures  
ploitation and the uncertain impacts of climate change are adding further pressures on fish res 
13969 2 stic forecasts of population growth and extinction risk in a changing environment. many of the  
sts of population growth and extinction risk in a changing environment. many of the most seriou 
14799 3 eristics and mechanisms conferring post-fire persistence. in these ecosystems, the two main per 
el, and the capacity of seeds to resist fire, which confers persistence at population level. in 
ogical and evolutionary consequences of fire history in the persistence mechanisms and in other 
11633 1 re of managed populations of farmed and endangered species.  
15502 4                                         biological invasions are one of the major causes affect 
terization of the invasive potential of alien species is, however, unresolved. in recent years, 
d. in recent years, the hypothesis that exotic species undergo rapid evolution when they invade 
portant to unravel the basic aspects of biological invasions and provide information on the fun 
10078 2 iations of plant av-ptgs in relation to climate change, because laboratory experiments has demo 
 predict the ecological consequences of global warming and the climate changes in the uk.  
14734 10 , but the potential consequences of the global warming have not been considered yet. the main o 
 project are: to estimate the potential extinction of vascular plant species as a consequence o 
e a medium-term monitoring plan for the endangered species. the underlying hypothesis is that t 
ography of the region, will lead to the habitat loss and/or fragmentation for many species thus 
n, will lead to the habitat loss and/or fragmentation for many species thus inducing their disa 
eir disappearance. additional secondary extinction is expected to occur due to the disappearanc 
 to estimate the magnitude of potential extinction by habitat loss, palaeoecological methods su 
he magnitude of potential extinction by habitat loss, palaeoecological methods such as pollen a 
ing the bases for impact evaluation and risk analysis, which are needed to classify the endange 
lysis, which are needed to classify the endangered species by their threaten degree and to defi 
11073 2 il. the arctic tundra receives such air pollution from around the northern hemisphere and is ve 
unt in the development of international pollution control legislation. our arctic experiment co 
12612 17 well as land causing or likely to cause pollution of controlled waters. harm with respect to hu 
n health is assessed using quantitative risk assessment which considers: concentrations of cont 
ed land. the first is that estimates of risk of health impacts from contaminated land do not qu 
rst is that estimates of risk of health impacts from contaminated land do not quantify the very 
ing dose and inferring potential health impacts. instead, this uncertainty is compensated throu 
protective estimate of potential health impacts associated with a particular site. the project  
se uncertainties associated with health impacts from contaminated land and then target quantifi 
ormation on the extent to which current risk estimates may be under- or over-protective of huma 
ample, one might hypothesise that total impacts on human health associated with air pollution f 
cts on human health associated with air pollution from road transport are several orders of mag 
t the relative costs to mitigate health impacts via the two sources and thus inform a debate ab 
ll generate information on total health impacts from contaminated land and then compare this wi 
 an overview of the direct and indirect impacts of contaminated land on human health and compar 
e an overview of the different types of risk to human health posed by contaminated land. 2. ass 
inty associated with determining health impacts from contaminated land and undertake quantitati 
y contaminants. 3. estimate the overall risk to human health due to exposure to contaminated la 
to the contaminants. 5. compare overall risk to human health from exposure to contaminated land 
14780 5 out to identify the potential impact of climate change upon the biota of montane aquatic system 
 regarded as particularly threatened by climate change and a change in their degree of permanen 
ns 3 community composition, 4 impact of exotic species and 5 impact of emerging diseases. gener 
se required to anticipate the degree of vulnerability to climate change and the corresponding p 
ticipate the degree of vulnerability to climate change and the corresponding preventive or miti 
13469 3 ollowing questions which are related to climate change: 1 is there less genetic variation at ra 
are northern species more vulnerable to climate change than southern species 3 how do community 
istic laboratory experiments simulating climate change are and if it is possible to extrapolate 
11163 6 re consequences of human activities and climate change on key environmental conditons. but ther 
mplex ways, as with flooding and forest fire, but when humans are involved these changes can be 
elatively long timescales. for example, pollution of rivers and lakes by sewage and fertlizers  
e several decades from the start of the pollution to the whole water system reacting in terms o 
nmental problems. there is accelerating soil erosion on the hilly lands; deteriorating water qu 
ver-present threat of flooding; coastal erosion from rising sea-levels; pressure to produce mor 
12537 3 sing economic, environmental and social impacts. work package 3: enhancing techniques for stand 
 for standardising and summarising pest risk assessments. objective is to enhance techniques fo 
apping endangered areas and summarising risk work package 4: enhancing techniques for pathway a 
1982 1 ces in silk investment affect predation risk and predator-prey dynamics, as well as how these d 
13584 1 r by moving away from areas with higher risk. these studies, however, either used caged predato 
9945 5                                         global warming is creating an extensively modified worl 
 events e.g., breeding season and local extinction. new evidence suggests that the underlying s 
these ecosystems will respond to future global warming are unknown. an understanding of these p 
ponds to simulate the effects of future global warming. the combination of these approaches wil 
ucial predictive tools for the study of global warming on ecosystems. while our experimental ma 
11798 1 heir potential as long-term archives of climate change. this interest is demonstrated by three  
10714 1  over the past 40.000 years. this rapid climate change is likely to have pronounced effects in  
9851 2                                   rapid climate change and habitat fragmentation are expected t 
               rapid climate change and habitat fragmentation are expected to disrupt ecologica 
13884 1  have a limited life-time, ii study the extinction debt, i.e. analyze to what extent the curren 
10108 2 ver, novel challenges and risks such as climate change, genetic modification, invasive species  
s climate change, genetic modification, invasive species and the loss of biodiversity, mean tha 
13596 2 andscape scale, and how this relates to nitrification and nitrate leaching in different crop pr 
g in different crop production systems. nitrification is a two-step process, in which nh3 is ox 
11454 2  interest in the consequences of abrupt climate change, and uses these data to parameterise age 
 between variations in these indices of climate change and key population parameters.  
2069 2  the project extends beyond the current risk assessment of transgenes, which is focused primari 
us be instrumental in ensuring adequate risk assessments of novel gene constructs prior to regu 
12167 1 stem services and within the context of climate change. to update the evidence base and identif 
12562 3 native fish species under conditions of climate change; refine the hazard identification and as 
 prioritising actions; and evaluate the impacts of non-native species on native species and str 
 ecosystem function so as to inform the risk assessment process. key customer purpose: analyse  
2190 4 ty considerations in physical planning, environmental impact assessments . the project will mai 
ve tools dealing with the evaluation of impacts on biodiversity. the development of ecological  
tructure, recreation and forestry cause fragmentation and disturbance effects on natural habita 
on and forestry cause fragmentation and disturbance effects on natural habitats. the method is  
14518 1 bundance of agrochemicals released. the risk of exposure to agrochemicals will be assessed, pay 
13869 6                              prescribed fire is becoming an increasingly used conservation and  
eas that have been altered by long-term fire suppression, thereby providing appropriate habitat 
rom forest fires. the effects of forest fire can be divided into specific direct effects depend 
 into specific direct effects depend on fire-created substrates. this laboratory-based objectiv 
ependence of selected fungal species on fire-killed and non fire-killed wood substrates  
d fungal species on fire-killed and non fire-killed wood substrates  
461 2 ought about decline or maybe even local extinction of numerous populations. in tropical zones s 
l scale. eventually we hope to stop the erosion of biodiversity among seabirds in the region wh 
13837 3 w evidence indicate that pre-industrial human impact in northern sweden. our hypothesis is that 
be carried out to identify gradients of human impact and to direct detailed investigations. the 
comparative studies, and for studies on disturbance and resilience in forest ecosystems and to  
14123 1  volatile compound on air quality under climate change and provides relevant information on the 
2105 8  sequestration of climate gases. future climate change is of vital interest for forestry and en 
y, and it is important to analyze which impacts climate changes may have on forests, forestry a 
 prognosis from regclim to estimate the climate change impacts on main forest ecosystem functio 
 regclim to estimate the climate change impacts on main forest ecosystem functions. s3: integra 
ting bio-economic models to analyze the climate change impacts on forest management, carbon seq 
ic models to analyze the climate change impacts on forest management, carbon sequestration, and 
ing the relative importance of the main risk factors. the project will be done in cooperation w 
orest process modeling, and be based on climate change data provided by regclim.  
14617 1 atorralization in the central pyrennes. disturbance value of alpine grassland.  
12560 2                                    many weeds occur in patches but farmers frequently spray who 
ently spray whole fields to control the weeds in these patches. given a geo-referenced weed map 
2076 2 cal diversity are represented by marine pollution from different sources and from over-fishing  
e living resources. fishing has serious impacts on the biological diversity, and the project wi 
11145 1 g decades, which suggest more prolonged drought periods as well as more intense precipitation e 
12189 3  clean water, flood control, storage of greenhouse gases and pollination of crops. they also in 
iment and nutrients and so reduce water pollution. while the potential is clear, the evidence f 
ll collate and analyse the evidence for impacts of environmental stewardship and similar land m 
12360 1 rms of monitoring and/or mitigating the environmental impact.  
10628 3 , the tables may be turned if predation risk is high and the greater activity of the bold anima 
 styles cope with environmental change. climate change, such as global warming and other human  
nmental change. climate change, such as global warming and other human influences e.g. toxicant 
15451 1 ased on the mass spectrometric analysis risk assessment of the bacteriological water quality fo 
15348 1  ancestry. also we evaluate the role of climate change, dispersal and plate tectonics in confir 
12540 1 d expansion of the eu and the impact of climate change. currently identifying pathogens . the o 
11183 4 pture and storage / potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage call. quantifying  
ying and monitoring potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage to a small scale t 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
9858 2 he urban environment from biodiversity, climate change adaptation, air quality management, envi 
 for the region, such as the manchester climate change and biodiversity strategies and the gm a 
2016 3 ffects of chemical stressors is causing erosion in public acceptance of expensive environmental 
s. one should realize that although the pollution peaks in surface waters in the 1970s have now 
ultimately be a basis for environmental risk management. firstly by underpinning environmental  
10166 3                                         climate change caused by increasing emissions of co2, p 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
10215 4 pture and storage / potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage call. quantifying  
ying and monitoring potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage to a small scale t 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
10415 3                                         climate change caused by increasing emissions of co2, p 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
10671 3                                         climate change caused by increasing emissions of co2, p 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
10931 4 pture and storage / potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage call. quantifying  
ying and monitoring potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage to a small scale t 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
11719 4 pture and storage / potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage call. quantifying  
ying and monitoring potential ecosystem impacts of geological carbon storage to a small scale t 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
11182 3                                         climate change caused by increasing emissions of co2, p 
 scientific tools necessary to form ccs risk assessments and quantitative knowledge of the ecol 
uantitative knowledge of the ecological impacts of leaks. we will develop model tools that can  
11850 1 ental policy. we are in the midst of an extinction crisis. for example, in 2004 the iucn report 
13761 1 position and structure, all with direct impacts on basic ecosystem services and biodiversity. c 
10274 1 these changes will be. will we see more extinction will life in the oceans become less abundant 
10359 1 ean succession a new method of tracking climate change will be used to calculate for the first  
11227 3 ropical pacific, it has near world-wide impacts because of the way it affects the circulation o 
o activity, or how enso will respond to climate change. to help answer some of these questions, 
volcanic eruptions, solar radiation and greenhouse gases in these models. by comparing the mode 
9895 3 ropical pacific, it has near world-wide impacts because of the way it affects the circulation o 
o activity, or how enso will respond to climate change. to help answer some of these questions, 
volcanic eruptions, solar radiation and greenhouse gases in these models. by comparing the mode 
15572 7 species are experiencing some degree of extinction threat and even widespread species are disap 
phibians are dying in the wild from the disease chytridiomycosis. nevertheless the extent that  
he extent that this invasive infectious disease is impacting on amphibian biodiversity is almos 
ler of amphibians, race will assess the risk that bd poses to european amphibians and will impl 
 first pan-european attempt to mitigate disease. we will do this by identifying the natural and 
technologies to rapidly acquire spatial disease and biodiversity data from field-teams of resea 
ly integrated into the global amphibian disease surveillance effort. alongside field-data on th 
10779 14                                      if global warming runs its course, what will be the effect 
ed million years, the earth experienced global warming on a massive scale, completely melting t 
pical rainforests began to dieback. did global warming trigger extinction not everyone agrees.  
 to dieback. did global warming trigger extinction not everyone agrees. others point the finger 
ed decline or an abrupt crunch, and was global warming or mountain building responsible to achi 
n that a cause of change. so what about global warming to find out what the climate was doing d 
t what the climate was doing during the extinction event we plan to study pores in the leaves o 
ut together a high-resolution record of climate change through the key time interval. we will t 
val. we will then see how the timing of climate change corresponds with the timing of rainfores 
ncide, it doesn t necessarily mean that climate change caused rainforest dieback. you can never 
s will test to see whether our observed climate change would lead to the observed rainforest di 
lp support any inferences we make about climate change and extinction. although our three hundr 
rences we make about climate change and extinction. although our three hundred million year old 
te of rainforest dieback in the face of climate change, and help us better predict future chang 
12420 1 lities for managing and advising on the impacts of human activities in the marine environment a 
12068 2                 the sixth event of mass extinction differs from the five previous one on three  
r to propose concrete solutions to curb extinction events.  
10694 1 ntial impact of the current man-induced climate change on modern plankton, analogous, rapid eve 
15199 1 the understanding of the development of disease within aquatic hosts. specifically, the aim of  
14800 2             recent climatic changes and risk of malaria reappearance in sw andalusia . our hypo 
 have an effect on the virulence of the disease in those zones where the direct wetlands-climat 
14973 6              in order to predict future impacts of global warming on species distributions it i 
  in order to predict future impacts of global warming on species distributions it is necessary 
utional limits and therefore, the local extinction/introduction of species can be considered as 
e consequences of the local, non-random extinction of these ecosystem engineers on ecosystem fu 
 properties as consequence of the local extinction of this two seaweeds. such studies linking b 
udies linking biodiversity changes, and extinction processes, are not common on marine systems. 
2001 1                              effects of climate change on the biodiversity and carbon accumulat 
14871 3 gical restoration of forest soils after fire could be improved by the addition of organic amend 
rea of forest previously destroyed by a fire, in the vicinity of the city of burgos. this exper 
in the regeneration of land affected by fire or the revegetation of agricultural land.  
7164 4 ioners and indigenous, can not curb the invasion or even to establish themselves seriously leaf 
verdrafts few guests. the extent of the invasion, the environmental and financial cost of curre 
er. then control can take place and the invasion of miners halt or recede. a method of practica 
oblem of biotic cascading effects of an invasion is always topical, both in basic research quap 
11180 1 and production of gases associated with climate change such as carbon dioxide. there are curren 
12207 1 levels of weed control with the minimum risk of crop damage and residues and with substantial r 
13348 9 water ecosystems will respond to future climate change is essential for the development of poli 
 also dependent on changes in land-use, pollution loading and water demand. in addition the mea 
o be designed either to adapt to future climate change or to mitigate the effects of climate ch 
te change or to mitigate the effects of climate change in the context of changing land-use. gen 
es that account for the expected future impacts of climate change and land-use change in the co 
ount for the expected future impacts of climate change and land-use change in the context of th 
e taken to minimise the consequences of climate change on freshwater quantity, quality and biod 
of freshwater ecosystems is affected by climate change; ii new indicators of functional respons 
tional response and tools for assessing vulnerability; iii modelling ecological processes; iv i 
15587 1 ell as those underpinning robustness or vulnerability of the entire system coupled through land 
2012 2 ading on microbial abundance, microbial degradation pathways and benthic community structure wi 
ing between oxic, suboxic and anaerobic degradation pathways as well as the influence of benthi 
13795 1  ecosystem-based management options for eutrophication and fishing and taking into account thei 
15093 1 est communities along environmental and disturbance gradients. the specific objectives are: 1 t 
1935 3  of environmental stresses, such as air pollution, eutrophication or lowering of the water tabl 
mental stresses, such as air pollution, eutrophication or lowering of the water table. several  
ed to determine the actual seed bank of endangered species in these degraded situations. the fi 
10655 1  act as a means of minimising the heath risk to humans of shellfish consumption. hwever, throug 
11583 1  act as a means of minimising the heath risk to humans of shellfish consumption. hwever, throug 
15382 5 f wetlands as green filters: effects of eutrophication, plant species and the season of the yea 
and scientific innovation 2008-2011, ...pollution and degradation of ecosystems, depletion of r 
 innovation 2008-2011, ...pollution and degradation of ecosystems, depletion of resources, lost 
f biological and cultural diversity and global warming..., we propose a project in which the ef 
ropose a project in which the effect of eutrophication will be studied jointly with carbon sequ 
193 3 esources of l. peipsi forming potential risk to the ecosystem structure and functioning as well 
e are under the threat of anthropogenic eutrophication and are strongly influenced also by larg 
nian interests in preventing fish stock degradation and ensuring stability of the vulnerable ec 
10275 11  many amphibian species threatened with extinction as bird species. disease has been identified 
atened with extinction as bird species. disease has been identified as one of the major contrib 
led out as the most dangerous amphibian disease identified to date. batrachochytrium dendrobati 
ch to determine the distribution of the disease, how this distribution was achieved and the con 
on was achieved and the consequences of invasion of the pathogen for local amphibian communitie 
idwife toad, one of the most critically endangered species of amphibian. we now need to add to  
nfection in natural populations lead to extinction. firstly, we will intensively survey five fo 
survey five focal study sites where the disease is present, but is causing different effects in 
 the pathogen in their ability to cause disease, and to test this idea we will perform challeng 
icit goal of predicting the dynamics of disease emergence across several scales. we have strong 
obal-warming on the distribution of the disease within europe. our aim is that these short and  
11303 11  many amphibian species threatened with extinction as bird species. disease has been identified 
atened with extinction as bird species. disease has been identified as one of the major contrib 
led out as the most dangerous amphibian disease identified to date. batrachochytrium dendrobati 
ch to determine the distribution of the disease, how this distribution was achieved and the con 
on was achieved and the consequences of invasion of the pathogen for local amphibian communitie 
idwife toad, one of the most critically endangered species of amphibian. we now need to add to  
nfection in natural populations lead to extinction. firstly, we will intensively survey five fo 
survey five focal study sites where the disease is present, but is causing different effects in 
 the pathogen in their ability to cause disease, and to test this idea we will perform challeng 
icit goal of predicting the dynamics of disease emergence across several scales. we have strong 
obal-warming on the distribution of the disease within europe. our aim is that these short and  
14550 1 ogical conservation models to depend on fragmentation and destruction of continuous habitats by 
13460 1 ity management and research, especially invasive species surveys.  
11859 3 on stored in the terrestrial biosphere. climate change may affect the bog s water balance, whic 
s is because degraded peatlands release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, instead of abs 
tant variable to monitor in relation to climate change. plant communities living on the bog sur 
14365 3 he rate, spatial patterns and ecosystem impacts of forest cover change in these environments is 
- monitoring of forest-cover change and degradation; - mapping of ecosystem services with high  
forest transition are very relevant for climate change policies and possible future obligations 
7130 1 d objectives of reform are to study how climate change and rising atmospheric co2 levels will a 
14694 1 ffected by overexploitation and habitat degradation belonging to the instituto canario de cienc 
14860 1 project will include the study of three endangered species of gazelles which are part of captiv 
15227 2 edigree information are unrealistic for endangered species, leading to serious underestimates o 
rm aneuploidies and levels of sperm dna fragmentation. we will examine the role of protamines i 
14791 1 ogy on distribution and conservation of endangered species of ferns, and also to contribute to  
7005 1 o more suitable habitats in the case of climate change.  
12181 1  will require may have implications for climate change.  
12415 1 mproved evidence base for assessment of eutrophication required to meet a range of current poli 
13828 6 e, i.e. the ability of system to resist disturbance and the rate at which it returns to equilib 
ich it returns to equilibrium following disturbance to a large degree determines the fragility  
rmines the fragility of an ecosystem to disturbance caused by human activities. an understandin 
 insects, saproxylic parasitic wasps to disturbance resulting from forest practise and, by that 
cosystem level, thus minimizing overall species loss.we will use a unique field experiment that 
cosystem level, thus minimizing overall species loss.  
15069 1              on august 2003, a woodland fire of 4543 ha in sant llorenç del munt natural park a 
6925 1 eaf rust is one of the most devastating disease of the wheat occuring every year in hungary. it 
10256 5 infectious particle. alternatively, the disease can be vertically transmitted following adult r 
 be uninfected. these are called covert disease infections because the pathogen does not cause  
nce horizontal transmission of a lethal disease kills the host, it will clearly impede the vert 
y variable densities, such as pests and invasive species. identifying the conditions that favou 
 mode and their impact on both host and disease ecology is crucial.  
11267 5 infectious particle. alternatively, the disease can be vertically transmitted following adult r 
 be uninfected. these are called covert disease infections because the pathogen does not cause  
nce horizontal transmission of a lethal disease kills the host, it will clearly impede the vert 
y variable densities, such as pests and invasive species. identifying the conditions that favou 
 mode and their impact on both host and disease ecology is crucial.  
15394 4 to global environmental changes such as climate change and habitat destruction has prompted a p 
onstraints, but also by the type of the disturbance, the demographic characteristics of the pop 
e response to changes in the context of biological invasions, the urbanization process and clim 
invasions, the urbanization process and climate change.  
2529 2 rrent modelling tools for environmental risk assessment of offshore oil drilling activities. st 
o mitigate environmental and ecological impacts to marine benthic habitats. furthermore, this p 
15442 2 is project aim to assess the effects of eutrophication over natural assemblages inhabiting inte 
reventing or mitigating their potential impacts.  
2532 2 0, resulting in increased temperatures, ocean acidification and dominant copepod species, dom p 
template for transformative research on impacts of oa on biologically mediated elemental flux t 
15151 1 ber of episodes of particularly intense drought that had often produced serious defoliation and 
15360 1 ntal stressors to minimize irreversible impacts over seagrass meadows constituted by c. nodosa  
15125 1 responses of organisms to the projected global warming are a major handicap for the adoption of 
12142 6 eshwater environment were mainly due to global warming and human activities. the most significa 
t problem of the affected ecosystems is biological invasion. recently, a large number of europe 
the invasive algae gonyostomum semen on vulnerability of the native species, their adaptation f 
he native species, their adaptation for biological invasions, and structural organization of pl 
the local community resistance to algal invasion will be characterized. analysis of intraspecif 
rder to mitigate the negative impact of invasive species.  
11500 2  of how tree species respond to habitat disturbance, especially for partially clonal species fo 
 how tree species respond to widespread disturbance as a result of human activities in order to 
15357 3  of humankind has caused a major global ecological footprint that is associated to loss of biod 
m services will depend upon the initial degradation of restored ecosystems and the time that ec 
as a function of the ecosystems initial degradation and the time that ecological restoration ha 
1934 1 e netherlands by soil acidification and eutrophication as a result of atmospheric deposition. i 
7615 3  specific case of arenaria grandiflora, endangered species forest of fontainebleau. we propose  
 . issues related to the restoration of endangered species populations are particularly acute i 
 in the context of the 6th biodiversity extinction crisis. the convention on biological diversi 
10946 4 nique area also has some of the highest extinction rates in the world with extensive habitat de 
tes in the world with extensive habitat degradation and widespread impact from introduced speci 
 degradation and widespread impact from introduced species. the islands therefore present one o 
nstruct the long-term impact of natural disturbance and human presence on the native plant comm 
13809 5 ntal variables, such as the quality and fragmentation of habitats, may have an important effect 
bitats, may have an important effect on invasion success and distribution pattern of an invadin 
because we have not suffered from large extinction events as a result of invading species, as h 
 and new zealand. however, with ongoing climate change, increased shipping of goods and increas 
weden is likely to expect an increasing risk of species’ invasions in the future. the aim of th 
12152 1 phagnum moss, which is very sensitve to disturbance of water supply. britain is one of the main 
12737 3 and deliverables against the adaptation climate change principles, and to identify where furthe 
edding process towards development of a climate change adaptation strategy as part of the ebs b 
re self sufficient in taking account of climate change in their areas  
12352 1 equirements, methods, data, results and impacts in order to make recommendations for monitoring 
12733 1 ils, statutory undertakers, the police, fire service, health and transport authorities.  
12240 2 e the incidence of soil-borne pests and disease. crop rotation and its associated management pr 
, through host alternation and physical disturbance. in recent years there has been considerabl 
14198 1 e conclusions related to the aspects of climate change will be introduced to the estonian socie 
476 7 species are experiencing some degree of extinction threat and even widespread species are disap 
phibians are dying in the wild from the disease chytridiomycosis. nevertheless the extent that  
he extent that this invasive infectious disease is impacting on amphibian biodiversity is almos 
ler of amphibians, race will assess the risk that bd poses to european amphibians and will impl 
 first pan-european attempt to mitigate disease. we will do this by identifying the natural and 
technologies to rapidly acquire spatial disease and biodiversity data from field-teams of resea 
ly integrated into the global amphibian disease surveillance effort. alongside field-data on th 
2202 5 is to develop a general methodology for risk analysis of invasions by alien species in aquatic  
ology for risk analysis of invasions by alien species in aquatic environments. the general meth 
 characteristics of the three phases of invasion are the most important for management and for  
he development of a methodology for the risk analysis is not foreseen to be the major challenge 
 extrapolations, the uncertainty of the risk analysis will be larger than if data were availabl 
7527 1                              facing the extinction of many species, the scientific community is 
7179 1  an updated and documented inventory of alien species present on our territory is becoming a ne 
10790 1 eld studies on methanotrophs, assist in climate change studies, and provide a tool for predicti 
11250 1 ra is to understand how the environment impacts upon the genome. it is likely that much of the  
11253 1 ra is to understand how the environment impacts upon the genome. it is likely that much of the  
11482 1 ra is to understand how the environment impacts upon the genome. it is likely that much of the  
11792 1 ra is to understand how the environment impacts upon the genome. it is likely that much of the  
15058 7                                     the invasion of exotic species is an important factor affec 
                        the invasion of exotic species is an important factor affecting biodive 
wn but important aspect in the study of invasion dynamics is to understand what factors determi 
 what factors determine the capacity of invasion when an exotic species colonizes a new habitat 
ermine the capacity of invasion when an exotic species colonizes a new habitat. from the multip 
 however, once in the introduced range, invasive plants may also be colonized by local herbivor 
ic aspects of ecosystem dynamics during invasion.  
7640 3 l areas, lowering the levels of diffuse pollution is associated with the installation of grassy 
pollutants and particles present in the runoff thus promoting them treatment while limiting ero 
promoting them treatment while limiting erosion. phytobandes the project aims to characterize t 
14485 1 iversity on the ecosystem resistance to biological invasions. ants has been chosen as the indic 
14099 2  future agriculture in order to develop drought resistant crops, but also in the context of ana 
text of analyzing processes affected by climate change.  
7715 3               in the current context of climate change and the increasing world population, sol 
nd in the world were degraded mainly by erosion and landslides, loss of land resulting also hav 
 the role of roots in the fight against erosion and landslides will also be clarified through e 
12760 3 lders; risks to biodiversity and social impacts are likely. it is essential that any future mit 
his project will focus on the potential impacts to agriculture and on possible management techn 
management techniques to mitigate those impacts. the study will provide a comprehensive review  
13332 3  problem in developing policies to stop biodiversity loss is translating threats into a tangibl 
olicies, which are essential to halting biodiversity loss. nature is fundamentally dynamic, as  
 freshwater ecosystems by reviewing the impacts of global change on those components of biodive 
11213 3 h s atmosphere are driving a process of global warming that will have a profound effect on plan 
t photosynthesis. some models of future climate change predict alarming scenarios for the latte 
tant challenge in the context of global climate change.  
10855 1 and production of gases associated with climate change such as carbon dioxide. accurate determi 
14378 1 on rates in order to create liver fluke risk maps at the landscape scale.  
15428 1  colonizing schist, and their potential impacts on stone properties. 6.- to establish conservat 
11474 1 of soil, seas through to freshwater and disease. however, the assembly of large communities in  
7480 1 applications: a forest surveillance and fire detection system in portugal and distant learning  
13349 2 the resulting scale-dependencies of the impacts of these pressures on various levels of biodive 
s of management and policy responses to biodiversity loss in terms of their scale-relevance and 
10841 1 hts into the biology of this critically endangered species, allowing managers to better protect 
12426 2  seas, and recognises that since marine pollution and other impacts often transcend national bo 
s that since marine pollution and other impacts often transcend national boundaries, national a 
12064 3 neration of models of plant response to climate change that can address several of the key shor 
gers with quantitative estimates of the impacts of climate change and climate extremes on plant 
uantitative estimates of the impacts of climate change and climate extremes on plant diversity  
12708 1 rs, with reference to issues concerning climate change and wetlands, linking as appropriate to  
12183 1  compaction, in its various forms, also impacts on above and below ground biodiversity, the flo 
12180 2 crop cover, and phosphate losses due to soil erosion. in order to assess whether agri-environme 
t of habitat restoration vs the overall environmental impact in fiscal terms, including the con 
12188 2 england’s uplands, and to contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation, by supporting 
e indicators which can be used to model impacts on the target environmental variables. a range  
12289 2 ems. high water abstraction and diffuse pollution from fertilisers can have negative impacts on 
tion from fertilisers can have negative impacts on adjacent ecosystems. nitrogen . this will pr 
13787 1 undance and condition of prey. indirect impacts will be addressed more specifically, by studyin 
10481 1 loping biological markers for assessing climate change.  
7466 2 the resulting scale-dependencies of the impacts of these pressures on various levels of biodive 
s of management and policy responses to biodiversity loss in terms of their scale-relevance and 
13949 2  cod, a process that causes substantial disturbance to the sediment. however, the extent and im 
er, the extent and implications of this disturbance have not been investigated. the aim of this 
228 1 ifferences can determine the rarity and vulnerability of an orchid. the main objectives of the  
11237 2 illion. because hematodinium-associated disease can cause high death rates amongst crustacean s 
species against hematodinium-associated disease.  
11578 4                                         climate change is proceeding apace. many populations ar 
 ratios, and hence may cause population extinction due to lack of males. the frequency of this  
n into potential agricultural pests and disease vectors, whereas other species risk going extin 
 disease vectors, whereas other species risk going extinct. it will also be of value to captive 
11830 4                                         climate change is proceeding apace. many populations ar 
 ratios, and hence may cause population extinction due to lack of males. the frequency of this  
n into potential agricultural pests and disease vectors, whereas other species risk going extin 
 disease vectors, whereas other species risk going extinct. it will also be of value to captive 
10984 3 rtility, mobility and ability to combat disease. however, the question is why is this one evolu 
ossibility of dying through accident or disease, genes which benefit us early in life will be b 
 die through being eaten, starvation or disease. as a consequence, we know very little about wh 
10953 2                                   early impacts of oxidised and reduced n on a blanket bog comm 
and identify areas of uk blanket bog at risk from n deposition. the use of p and k amelioration 
10054 1 e the functional basis of resistance or vulnerability to environmental change and impact in a c 
11582 1 e the functional basis of resistance or vulnerability to environmental change and impact in a c 
13333 1 ation of biodiversity and mitigation of climate change through carbon sequestration in water an 
12191 1  the objective of the uk bap is to halt habitat loss and species decline. in the bap, targets a 
10080 7 ities such as finding food and fighting disease. to be successful in reproduction, both sexes n 
erefore vital for females to reduce the risk of dying. bacteria, viruses and other natural enem 
k of dying. bacteria, viruses and other natural enemies of animals are widespread and can be de 
ker immune systems and be more prone to disease compared to females. our research will test thi 
 good as monogamous females at fighting disease. studies of insects are important. they can rev 
f the devices used by mammals to combat disease and infection. this fascinating research will h 
hich will alter the number of hosts and natural enemies that live in our environment and also h 
15081 1 mpetitiveness, which could increase the risk of polispermy to females. females will respond to  
11844 1 ponse to emergencies such as floods and disease outbreak. the internet is a very useful means f 
15588 2 ionale: studying the effects of extreme drought on biodiversity and ecosystem functions is a ke 
tem functions is a key facet of current climate change research. in particular, identifying mec 
12668 4 onitoring aims to understand effects of climate change and atmospheric pollution on biodiversit 
fects of climate change and atmospheric pollution on biodiversity and to provide evidence in su 
n and policy making to mitigate adverse impacts. it involves measurement of aspects of climate  
s measurement of aspects of climate and pollution with assessment of biodiversity, such sensiti 
13867 5 uth swedish habitats and determine soil disturbance influence on am fungal communities; diversi 
weden will be studied and the impact of disturbance and successional stage on the am fungal com 
udied in order to test the intermediate disturbance hypothesis for am fungal diversity. specifi 
: 1. to determine the influence of soil disturbance on the diversity, species composition, biom 
munities. 2. to investigate if observed disturbance-induced changes in diversity and community  
12632 10 relating to soil functions, quality and degradation. the five principal outputs will provide ev 
ctive b: to address the effects of soil degradation on the ability of soils to function and ide 
eview the overall costs and benefits of soil erosion measures and to identify cost-effective mi 
ar view of the current knowledge on the impacts of climate change on soil processes, functions  
the current knowledge on the impacts of climate change on soil processes, functions and its rel 
xternal inputs; explore evidence on the impacts of soil degradation on soil functions; review t 
explore evidence on the impacts of soil degradation on soil functions; review the costs and ben 
s of mitigation measures used to reduce soil erosion; and review the potential impacts of clima 
 soil erosion; and review the potential impacts of climate change on soil processes, functions  
on; and review the potential impacts of climate change on soil processes, functions and biota.  
7477 2 es, computational models that integrate soil erosion, solute transport, carbon dynamics and foo 
 soil formation, its productive use and degradation. existing data sets will be augmented with  
13350 2  consequences for outbreaks of pests or invasive species. soilservice will link ecological and  
il ecosystem services are vulnerable to disturbance. • detecting processes that indicate when e 
11246 4 centrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. assuming greenhouse 
sment of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, the high latitudes will experience the  
 melting of polar ice-sheets and global sea level rise. for a further understanding of potentia 
that we rely upon for simulating future climate change.  
12447 1 nnel, and the potential consequences of climate change upon these processes. develop a forecast 
15016 5 everal investigations have revealed the risk of species adapted to low temperatures in the moun 
rature elevation. although not only the climate change will have important effect on the dynami 
ly sensitive to the land use change and climate change. in consequence, this ecosystem and can  
 it is too late to prevent irreversible degradation. the analysis will be performed analyzing a 
 identify cascade mechanisms leading to biodiversity loss. in short, cebce project aims is to i 
10347 1 nsequences of habitat deterioration and fragmentation on population structure and the maintenan 
10541 1 espond to environmental change, such as habitat loss or changes in climate. we know that densit 
11510 2 ternative ways to control the spread of disease. one promising alternative is the use of bacter 
s a mechanism for controlling bacterial disease. further, this research will emphasise that coe 
7686 2 ental policies and contribute to reduce vulnerability landscapes. to meet this lock pointed to  
one second case study will focus on the vulnerability of water resources directly related to th 
15531 3 mate changes, and associated changes in disturbance frequency and severity. understanding the r 
sity determine ecosystem functioning in fire-prone mediterranean woodlands. the project will fo 
f the project are: on plant response to fire. the project will be carried out in the framework  
15282 3 rigin of this enigmatic distribution: a fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
ctors that have shaped it through time: fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
inental flora by vicariance and gradual extinction, or dispersal and recent diversification bet 
14684 2 uniperus oxycedrus subsp macrocarpa, an endangered species which that has in doñana one of thei 
ement plans for the dune system and for endangered species such as the maritime juniper.  
2128 5       the movement and establishment of invasive species in new habitats is a global economic a 
petence building in order to reduce the risk of spread and establishment of invasive forest pes 
eetles. because direct experiments with introduced species are too dangerous, we will use a com 
e in bark beetle ecology, modelling and biological invasions . the budget includes a recruitmen 
as a part of the competence building on invasive species. the final results will include recomm 
2507 1                           the potential risk for fisheries imposed by the proposed petroleum ac 
14802 1 a to contribute to the knowledge of the endangered species and to obtain information that allow 
10826 1          global rates of speciation and extinction are estimated, in a comparison of assemblage 
15222 1 s in the iberian peninsula in different climate change and land-use change scenarios, reasonabl 
11765 5                                         climate change has the potential to cause massive disru 
 species, communities and ecosystems to climate change are among the greatest challenges facing 
tion. i will investigate the effects of climate change on communities of dung beetles, a guild  
group composition as a result of recent climate change, using data from four well-documented du 
e opportunity to evaluate the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems as a function  
10808 1 cal networks raising the possibility of extinction vortices in the networks, where the loss of  
14771 1 nomy of species usually not studied the risk of transmission of these parasites between ratites 
11380 1 ence applied research on the effects of climate change. combining life history theory with the  
11181 2 n functions to reduce sperm competition risk will be tested against the idea that it is a form  
tion to i dominance status and ii local risk of sperm competition, according to these predictio 
12567 1 er fish populations, including rare and endangered species. the study will also support the imp 
6721 2 lantations will be characterized by the fire danger index under various climatic scenarios and  
ion with the kew gardens. the impact of fire on the soil structure and element composition will 
6914 1 edator-two prey system. assume that the risk of predation is high in the habitat where food is  
15266 1 d effect of current aridity with future climate change is expected to particularly threaten for 
15265 1 d effect of current aridity with future climate change is expected to particularly threaten for 
11778 2 e impact of environmental measures thus risk assessment becomes a key driver of regulation, wit 
nd uncertainty. many factors, including climate change, interact to produce a complex environme 
14576 5                                         biological invasions have become so widespread as to co 
 routes. two others scalesof status and invasion spread dynamics will be considered: medium sca 
arras massif and the expansion range of invasion front. the potential of invasion related with  
nge of invasion front. the potential of invasion related with land uses, wild fires and conside 
h land uses, wild fires and considering climate change scenarios will be estimated and modelled 
7317 7 ional traits associated with particular risk, develop a red list of some european pollinator gr 
ntial drivers of such change, including climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agriche 
 such change, including climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogen 
luding climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogens, alien species, 
ragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogens, alien species, light pollution, and their interactions. 
micals, pathogens, alien species, light pollution, and their interactions. we will measure the  
ill measure the ecological and economic impacts of declining pollinator services and floral res 
13352 7 ional traits associated with particular risk, develop a red list of some european pollinator gr 
ntial drivers of such change, including climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agriche 
 such change, including climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogen 
luding climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogens, alien species, 
ragmentation, agrichemicals, pathogens, alien species, light pollution, and their interactions. 
micals, pathogens, alien species, light pollution, and their interactions. we will measure the  
ill measure the ecological and economic impacts of declining pollinator services and floral res 
12357 1 ospar current state of knowledge on the environmental impacts of the location, operation and re 
14750 1 rasitoids constitute the most important natural enemies for solitary wasps ; the form of the de 
12250 7 ect is to: define strategies to exploit risk assessment, genetic resistance and natural defence 
e more efficient use of natural assets. disease and its management affects the use of resources 
he use of resources – energy, water and disease resistance genes – that have wide implications  
ing spoilage. considering the effect of disease on the efficiency of use of each resource: wate 
s shown that certain important types of disease resistance to pathogen infection impact on wate 
e new findings and advocate sustainable disease risk management strategies which avoid waste of 
ndings and advocate sustainable disease risk management strategies which avoid waste of resourc 
10803 2 yanobacteria and model the influence of climate change on potentially toxic cyanobacteria produ 
d within the proposal. the human health risk from direct and indirect exposure to the toxins is 
11241 2 yanobacteria and model the influence of climate change on potentially toxic cyanobacteria produ 
d within the proposal. the human health risk from direct and indirect exposure to the toxins is 
11768 2 yanobacteria and model the influence of climate change on potentially toxic cyanobacteria produ 
d within the proposal. the human health risk from direct and indirect exposure to the toxins is 
11851 2 yanobacteria and model the influence of climate change on potentially toxic cyanobacteria produ 
d within the proposal. the human health risk from direct and indirect exposure to the toxins is 
11783 2 yanobacteria and model the influence of climate change on potentially toxic cyanobacteria produ 
d within the proposal. the human health risk from direct and indirect exposure to the toxins is 
11550 3                                         climate change is now recognised as one of the major gl 
amenable areas as temperatures rise and habitat fragmentation intensifies. those that are unabl 
ortunately, few empirical data exist on climate change effects on freshwater communities and fe 
15253 4                                invasive introduced species are a huge environmental issue, part 
abundance and ecological and economical impacts are formidable. the objective of our project is 
nvasibility of freshwater ecosystems by exotic species. we aim to quantify how much of the inva 
cal alteration and how much to chemical pollution with strong ecological impact: we will analys 
7023 2 ed to continue over the coming decades. human impacts on biodiversity take place against a back 
research recognises the consequences of biodiversity loss for the services and goods ecosystems 
11478 5  evolved to improve their resistance to disease. the chalkbrood parasite is also an excellent m 
how host and parasite genetic diversity impacts the evolution of the chalkbrood parasite. recen 
collapse disorder, have highlighted the vulnerability of honeybees to disease, but honeybees su 
ghted the vulnerability of honeybees to disease, but honeybees suffer from a number of widespre 
nd agriculture in the uk. the threat of disease is the principle concern of uk beekeepers today 
10897 3 hed management, national action plan on climate change and desertification, assessment of waste 
ional action plan on climate change and desertification, assessment of wasteland, new forest po 
tem services and the costs of ecosystem degradation. people depend on those services but the le 
2488 2 concerning the mechanisms of infectious disease pathogenesis and how diseases might be controll 
t future evolutionary events related to disease. recent phylogenetic studies of yersinia pestis 
14207 1 ge quantities for controlling pests and weeds, and thus greatly improve food production. howeve 
9956 1 ible relationships between porosity and vulnerability to cavitation while the membrane is under 
14915 1 munity. finally, we will assess whether invasive plants are less likely to interact with native 
15054 1 ewater is an essential process to avoid eutrophication in those streams receiving inputs from w 
10318 1 ed to become more common in the face of climate change. if my research shows that such variatio 
12628 1 . in contrast to some of the other soil degradation threats, the costs associated with soil com 
12635 4 oils and soil resilience in relation to climate change. the relationships between soil pollutan 
sing carbon storage in soil to mitigate climate change. objective b: to determine the relations 
w and make an initial assessment of the impacts of climate change on soils in the urban environ 
an initial assessment of the impacts of climate change on soils in the urban environment, addre 
7628 6  to meet many stresses, including water pollution. our team has recently shown that the diversi 
ese structures decreases in response to pollution, suggesting quune bacterial community can res 
 can respond specifically to particular pollution by disseminating in certain population integr 
ronments in response to various organic pollution, metal, pharmaceutical, and explore modalitie 
 to meet many stresses, including water pollution. . moreover our team has recently shown that  
versity, inti, decreases in response to pollution, suggesting that the bacterial community can  
7253 1 l perspective, ie, how men perceive the fragmentation of the landscape. the objective of this p 
7241 2 the contribution to emissions of n2o of nitrification and denitrification processes in the cont 
continuum formed by agricultural soils, runoff and drainage and waterways, along a transect a s 
14530 1  scholarships towards the environmental risk.  
14838 1 rms a separate branch within the border disease virus cluster. in 2005, 3 new outbreaks have be 
15034 1 bution system becoming an environmental risk. although there might be several causes, the main  
14917 5 is project is to evaluate the impact of drought stress in the life cycle of the desert truffle  
 is negatively influenced by the strong drought in these areas of the last years. the research  
elium and the mycorrhizal system, under drought stress; the evaluation of the participation of  
der water deficit and their role in the drought tolerance of the mycorrhizal plants, by physiol 
 mycelial and mycorrhizal levels, under drought stress conditions, which can affect its field s 
15239 1 velopment, under exteme temperature and drought. for this purpose, measurements of some defence 
13486 1 anging productivity levels, e.g. due to eutrophication and changes in ocean currents and upwell 
7431 2 th -calais region not in the context of climate change. this project will establish rapid diagn 
howing the evolution of exploitable and invasive species, information that will be taken over b 
14368 4  the last decades. population dynamics, climate change and market forces have led to overexploi 
forces have led to overexploitation and degradation. counteracting further impact to these ecos 
ly important in order to decrease their vulnerability to the naturally recurring drought in eas 
ulnerability to the naturally recurring drought in eastern africa. as a result, there is an inc 
12546 3 aim of this project is to better inform risk assessment and risk management approaches for the  
is to better inform risk assessment and risk management approaches for the specific emerging pe 
ibed above and to develop or strengthen risk management methods for soil phases of invertebrate 
6794 1 ation-units and the rare and endangered weeds will be provided on ceu mapped system.  
10936 8                                         biological invasions by alien species are occurring wit 
                biological invasions by alien species are occurring with increasing frequency i 
ts the susceptibility of communities to invasion. we will investigate how functional algal dive 
unities affects their susceptibility to invasion by an alien species, sargassum muticum, a succ 
 their susceptibility to invasion by an alien species, sargassum muticum, a successful invader  
l diversity that can be seeded with the alien species. the susceptibility of communities to inv 
s. the susceptibility of communities to invasion, and the impacts on community structure and ec 
ity of communities to invasion, and the impacts on community structure and ecosystem function w 
10010 1  affecting wild populations is loss and degradation of habitat, leading to altered availability 
14501 1 nditions in areas of high environmental risk  
13470 1 rrent populations might adapt to global climate change. in the present project we will build up 
7482 2 main perspectives; biological diversity risk, socio economic ability and cultural perceptions t 
erceptions to cope with effects of this risk. working in a 15-year perspective, the scenarios w 
14474 1 n models. we also want to analyse other human impacts . this gis will be based on the environme 
7206 2 patterns, determining factor of species extinction events at local and global scales, lead to t 
 to the destruction, transformation and fragmentation of natural habitats.  
11688 3  and protection from floods and coastal erosion. despite the importance of mangroves they are s 
 areas. we will combine these maps with risk maps and value maps that show areas under high thr 
on financing, such as those coming from climate change negotiations. unfortunately there is oft 
10943 3   this study aims to quantify the local extinction rates of forest vertebrates in both hunted a 
source fauna persistence and history of disturbance of 60 fragments in different size classes ; 
gistic interactions between hunting and habitat fragmentation affect tropical forest wildlife,  
12139 1 e the adaptation capacity of baltic sea invasive species prorocentrum minimum to adverse biotic 
13850 2 provide a preliminary assessment of the vulnerability of the swedish biosteres species to human 
 the swedish biosteres species to human environmental impact. the studied species will be docum 
7524 4                 the rabbit haemorrhagic disease or rhd is a scourge for the populations of wild 
r resistance to the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus viral. search the frequency of these muta 
 of breeding rabbits lines resistant to disease. secondly, a mathematical model, developed in t 
species taking into account the role of disease in the population dynamics  
14769 1 ble conclusions. c endemic or danger of extinction species. 2º in the accomplishment of these p 
15036 1 rasite and responsible for the whipworm disease which is, probably, the second most common huma 
2165 1 ocusing on still missing indicators for eutrophication and acidification of rivers and lakes, s 
15405 5 generated a proliferation of studies on climate change. we should be able to discern changes in 
hanges in ecosystem processes caused by climate change from those caused by natural variability 
of the national action on adaptation to climate change. the effects of climate change on ecosys 
ation to climate change. the effects of climate change on ecosystems, including those of headwa 
systems in the context of the projected climate change scenarios.  
15406 5 proliferate studies within the scope of climate change. we will be able to discern changes in e 
hanges in ecosystem processes caused by climate change from those of natural variability if we  
 a national action on adaptation to the climate change is enough to understand that it is very  
of temperature on earth. the effects of climate change on ecosystems, the headwater streams inc 
n stream ecosystems under the projected climate change scenarios.  
10220 10 gy is the study of how the frequency of disease changes over time, and the drivers of this chan 
 drivers of this change. for infectious disease , and may be very important in affecting diseas 
 and may be very important in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between g 
 in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between generations to persist. the 
the parental generation, and increasing disease transmission to it. one of the problems in cond 
ing a contact that exposes an animal to disease. we will circumvent this by examining a sexuall 
into how climate affects the pattern of disease in insects from temperate regions. it should pr 
 regions. it should predict how current disease patterns will vary over space, and also how dis 
erns will vary over space, and also how disease patterns of insects may change in the uk follow 
 insects may change in the uk following climate change.  
11430 10 gy is the study of how the frequency of disease changes over time, and the drivers of this chan 
 drivers of this change. for infectious disease , and may be very important in affecting diseas 
 and may be very important in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between g 
 in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between generations to persist. the 
the parental generation, and increasing disease transmission to it. one of the problems in cond 
ing a contact that exposes an animal to disease. we will circumvent this by examining a sexuall 
into how climate affects the pattern of disease in insects from temperate regions. it should pr 
 regions. it should predict how current disease patterns will vary over space, and also how dis 
erns will vary over space, and also how disease patterns of insects may change in the uk follow 
 insects may change in the uk following climate change.  
9902 9 gy is the study of how the frequency of disease changes over time, and the drivers of this chan 
 drivers of this change. for infectious disease , and may be very important in affecting diseas 
 and may be very important in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between g 
 in affecting disease transmission- the disease has to pass between generations to persist. the 
the parental generation, and increasing disease transmission to it. one of the problems in cond 
ing a contact that exposes an animal to disease. we will circumvent this by examining a sexuall 
into how climate affects the pattern of disease in insects from temperate regions. it should pr 
 regions. it should predict how current disease patterns will vary over space, and also how dis 
erns will vary over space, and also how disease patterns of insects may change when climate alt 
11377 2 nts in earth history, such as meteorite impacts and periods of extreme climate change, and biol 
eteorite impacts and periods of extreme climate change, and biological developments then the ag 
14785 1 t an evaluation about all those changes impacts and elaborating new strategies for a more intel 
11350 1 ous environments to derive criteria for invasion and persistence of saprotrophs and the creatio 
11068 3 aging specialisation may mean a greater vulnerability to the threat from climate change, fisher 
reater vulnerability to the threat from climate change, fisheries or pollution. if pre-breeders 
hreat from climate change, fisheries or pollution. if pre-breeders do not exhibit these consist 
10482 1 o the choice of immigrant genes and the risk of outbreeding depression. material from our exper 
10026 4 isms in nature experience an inevitable risk of death from environmental causes, and this leads 
cal theory predicts that increasing the risk of mortality will result in the evolution of faste 
es of variation in individual mortality risk and senescence rates in natural populations is req 
onments on variation in adult mortality risk. i will also test for differences in senescence ra 
10303 1 to demographic changes caused by global climate change.  
11233 8 tly experiencing unprecedented rates of habitat loss and environmental change. climate change a 
 habitat loss and environmental change. climate change alone is predicted to condemn at least o 
n at least one in ten of all species to extinction this century unless they can adapt to deal w 
hanging conditions. such a high rate of biodiversity loss is likely to have catastrophic effect 
he consequences of changing climate and habitat loss are likely to be for biodiversity. at spec 
ich species and populations are most at risk of extinction, it will also provide guidance on wh 
ies and populations are most at risk of extinction, it will also provide guidance on which stra 
duce, or plan for, the massive rates of biodiversity loss predicted for the coming centuries.  
9860 4  close by or in their social group. the disease therefore spreads spatially through the populat 
l spread can have a major effect on the disease dynamics. recent work has shown that this spati 
 local interactions on the evolution of disease causing organisms. given that anthropological c 
 implications are to wildlife and human disease.  
10421 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
10663 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
10685 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
10914 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
11692 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
9897 1 d biogeochemistry within the context of climate change. the cruises will also enable formal tra 
9821 2 stand the importance of large meteorite impacts on the earth and other planets in the solar sys 
he solar system. not only are meteorite impacts implicated in mass extinctions, they form traps 
15344 1 l activity have increased environmental pollution and caused major changes in territories and h 
15121 1 effect on the vegetation of the natural climate change is distinguished from the effect of the  
12448 1  frame in order to monitor responses to climate change. investigate links between cpr data and  
12509 3 ement of difficult-to-control perennial weeds in organic farming systems. the project was initi 
nts successful in controlling perennial weeds in the experiments would be modelled. data on cro 
eading to improved control of perennial weeds in organic stockless and pasture systems. better  
174 5 s known about the actual role of forest wildfire in the maintenance and recruitment of steppe o 
 species in boreal forests. in the past fire was the main factor causing large-scale disturbanc 
hind the decline of several potentially fire related plant species, e.g. geranium bohemicum, ar 
burning, direct and indirect effects of fire should be distinguished. the former include those  
 will be established in estonian forest wildfire areas and in the prescribed burning experiment 
11481 2  to change plant communities: dutch elm disease is a good example of this. the most common plan 
t microbe interaction however, is not a disease. the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi , and this sy 
10503 1 hese environmental factors will include climate change, the project being particularly relevant 
10505 1 hese environmental factors will include climate change, the project being particularly relevant 
10691 1 hese environmental factors will include climate change, the project being particularly relevant 
11002 1 hese environmental factors will include climate change, the project being particularly relevant 
10975 10                                         fire in natural ecosystems is a major agent of biome st 
ent of biome structure formation, biome degradation, atmospheric pollution and carbon emission. 
rmation, biome degradation, atmospheric pollution and carbon emission. in this proposal we will 
his proposal we will focus attention on fire dynamics on a potentially important but barely stu 
determine the environmental controls on fire ignition and spread, quantify the carbon emissions 
tial of remote sensing data to scale up fire emissions to the wider andean region. our project  
owing componets: 1. construction of the fire detailed fire history and fire map of a region of  
s: 1. construction of the fire detailed fire history and fire map of a region of the andean tre 
n of the fire detailed fire history and fire map of a region of the andean treeline, covering t 
calibrate satellite-based estimates for fire occurrence, extent and intensity 7. using calibrat 
10669 1 tal conditions - for example systematic climate change. long-term studies of individually-recog 
10886 1 tal conditions - for example systematic climate change. long-term studies of individually-recog 
11865 1 ated with protozoa, and will assess the impacts of sewage sludge and waste water treatment effl 
11683 1 ble these organisms might be to ongoing climate change. a necessary first step in understanding 
15141 5               earths biodiversity is at risk. species are disappearing at a rate only rivalled  
 rate only rivalled by episodes of mass extinction recorded in the fossil record. the sixth ext 
ecorded in the fossil record. the sixth extinction, however, has been driven by human activity. 
lomorphs are particularly vulnerable to extinction. we will combine population genetic tools wi 
nsis, and will predict future effect of global warming on the distribution and viability of the 
13595 3 n abundance is the result of fishing or climate change is a never ending debate among fishery m 
erstanding of how fishing mortality and climate change and variability affect marine fish popul 
asticity patterns will be compared with risk analysis using simulations in terms of credibility 
15308 3 lso need to assess the impact of global climate change on the variation of these factors and, c 
and scots pine, and the implications of climate change on the phenology of scots pine seed disp 
 and to anticipate the impact of global climate change on the interaction between these species 
10364 2 te the effect of contrasting dewatering disturbance regimes on the magnitude and distribution o 
ed monthly and at the end of a 21-month disturbance experiment. feeding links will be expressed 
14167 7 bal scenarios list the land-use change, habitat loss and fragmentation as the major factors of  
t the land-use change, habitat loss and fragmentation as the major factors of changes in terres 
even if the loss of forest area and its forest fragmentation has been reported to occur in high 
 two approaches to study the effects of habitat fragmentation and isolation on species dispersa 
evoted to the analysis of the effect of habitat loss, blurred by extinction delay debt. alterna 
 the effect of habitat loss, blurred by extinction delay debt. alternatively, exploring the col 
ation, possible dispersal corridors and anthropogenic disturbance on dispersal success of fores 
10268 4                                         invasive species have been identified by the iucn as th 
owever, the precise mechanisms by which invasive species impact native biodiversity are often p 
ng at several trophic levels, but their impacts on anything other than high-profile vertebrates 
sponsibility for uk islands, and to the invasive species community, both within the wider uk an 
2062 1 chanistic framework linking the grazing impacts on certain life stages to the dynamics of the p 
12702 1 will predict the likely consequences of climate change on internationally important bird popula 
2082 1 tify under which conditions an expected climate change will most strongly affect vertebrate pop 
13820 2 abundance or enhance the performance of natural enemies and improve biological control of pests 
rove the fitness of the parasitoids own natural enemies, then this would impact on the theory a 
12587 1 glish and welsh conditions. the 2006 uk climate change programme includes a policy commitment t 
2153 1 population dynamics will be affected by climate change. finally, the project will quantify unce 
2043 1 ing on the high seas in many cases also impacts adversely on fisheries resources inside the eez 
10530 6 ppeared in the aftermath of the biggest extinction event to have affected life on earth around  
ors of modern sea creatures. this major extinction event, which took place in the late permian  
astrophes, with similar combinations of global warming and expanding dead zones. all of these e 
. all of these events caused widespread extinction. we will undertake the first study of the ef 
take the first study of the effect that global warming, changes in ocean circulation, and expan 
 the resistance of marine ecosystems to extinction and collapse brought on by changes in temper 
13930 2 feri s. l.; the causative agent of lyme disease. like many other vector-borne pathogens, the ab 
changes of the environment, for example global warming. the long-term consequences for humans a 
14925 1  applied field of conservation biology. invasive species are nothing more than species that in  
11668 4 ny natural populations and communities. disease, and in particular disease that is shared betwe 
communities. disease, and in particular disease that is shared between more than one host are a 
ingly implicated in the decline of many endangered species. we therefore need to understand why 
 of host parasite evolution. infectious disease agents such as viruses typically have much shor 
11093 2 t aims to test whether the responses to climate change observed in tamiasciurus hudsonicus over 
 evolution in the direction of expected climate change. these analyses will be based on the rec 
2508 4 rway, as a consequence of over-fishing, eutrophication, coastal development and climate change, 
eutrophication, coastal development and climate change, and often bring with them substantial n 
antial negative ecological and economic impacts, which have been the focus of attention in nume 
ical and species-specific variation and climate change.  
11580 3                      the major cause of climate change is the atmospheric reintroduction via fo 
nfrared radiation, which contributes to global warming. an effective way to limit the effects o 
n effective way to limit the effects of global warming is through the removal of carbon contain 
6746 1  in hungary that almost avoided all the human impact. moreover some new water power plants are  
10247 1 imescales events like el nino can cause drought. our understanding of these different variation 
10672 1 e populations from a period when marine pollution, exploitation and global anthropogenic impact 
2487 3 es include environmental threats due to global warming, habitat fragmentation, and introduction 
onmental threats due to global warming, habitat fragmentation, and introduction of alien specie 
itat fragmentation, and introduction of alien species. to cope with such threats and persist, p 
10926 1 of the biogeochemical fluxes that drive climate change. for such an important group of organism 
11224 2  fundamental processes in evolution are extinction where species die out, and speciation, where 
nge seems linked to both speciation and extinction is in the holarctic, a region from europe ac 
14593 1 , and enter into aestivation during the drought periods. despite their phyletic position, and o 
10205 2 seed assemablages and phytolith and the weeds associated with different agricultural practices  
gan to elevate methane levels and cause global warming. our new methods will allow us to test t 
12407 1 s species are more susceptible to noise impacts. it will feed into the model being created unde 
10698 1 ur climate is changing. the emission of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and methane, are  
11316 6 sea temperature increases due to global climate change have already caused mass mortality of co 
 the last 5-10 years. given the current climate change predictions from organisations like the  
s have proposed that these increases in disease are linked to climate change and we aim here to 
hese increases in disease are linked to climate change and we aim here to test whether temperat 
ss increases a corals susceptibility to disease by monitoring indicators of health, antimicrobi 
s therfore vital that we understand the disease process so that appropriate and effective measu 
11689 7 ronmental informatics programme and the climate change cross-cutting theme there is an emerging 
ity of animal species are responding to climate change, and that many species are at risk of ex 
te change, and that many species are at risk of extinction from climate warming. the main metri 
e, and that many species are at risk of extinction from climate warming. the main metrics of ch 
open up a new avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. it will prov 
ew avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. it will provide specifi 
. conservation strategies must adapt to climate change, but conservationists are uncertain abou 
11845 7 ronmental informatics programme and the climate change cross-cutting theme there is an emerging 
ity of animal species are responding to climate change, and that many species are at risk of ex 
te change, and that many species are at risk of extinction from climate warming. the main metri 
e, and that many species are at risk of extinction from climate warming. the main metrics of ch 
open up a new avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. it will prov 
ew avenue of research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. it will provide specifi 
. conservation strategies must adapt to climate change, but conservationists are uncertain abou 
12618 1 nd, safeguarding our soils the land use climate change report to the welsh assembly government. 
12568 2 w the levels expected in the absence of human impacts, including pollution. the research is the 
the absence of human impacts, including pollution. the research is therefore needed to provide  
2007 2 ct on a long term. it was expected that global warming would result in higher temperatures of t 
 in order to study the relation between climate change and variations in biodiversity. in parti 
10780 1 ssue, as it will help us understand how climate change and management will interact to influenc 
11307 1 ssue, as it will help us understand how climate change and management will interact to influenc 
12145 3 economic effects caused by this mollusk invasion in the us amount to billions, while there are  
empts to grow this species to fight the eutrophication and improve the water quality in natural 
to use the dresena farming to fight the eutrophication and improve the water quality.  
13985 2 stance dispersal determine the relative vulnerability of ferns to climate change.  
 the relative vulnerability of ferns to climate change.  
11553 2 . the selective pressure was industrial pollution containing a group of compounds known as quat 
s to study the contribution of man made pollution to the evolution of antibiotic resistance. re 
175 1 rojects explores to what extent natural disturbance regimes indicate the reaction of forest bio 
12686 2  parakeets are thought to have negative impacts on native hole-nesting bird species. this proje 
he need for control of this potentially invasive species, in the context of the emerging policy 
12249 1 sity and soil protection, and policy on climate change through studies of alternative energy cr 
13489 1 cosystem structures, but their relative impacts depend on ecosystem productivity. the main obje 
12569 1 o investigate how the impact of diffuse pollution on salmonid populations may be modified by ch 
10050 6  governance frameworks. such tradeoffs, impacts and linkages are evident along the pongola rive 
service provision and high incidence of disease. as a result the downstream communities are exc 
makers, empowering them to consider the impacts of their actions on both ecosystem functioning  
who are mandated to address many of the impacts of decreased ecosystem services such as reduced 
ed agricultural potential and increased disease thereby influencing poverty. a key component of 
apacity to improve understanding of the impacts on ecosystem services and the complex links to  
11772 2  exposure to harmful elements, and also pollution arising from human activities with the releas 
rmful changes caused by mankind through pollution.  
13975 4 ing prey population dynamics evaluating impacts of biodiversity loss on ecosystem function requ 
pulation dynamics evaluating impacts of biodiversity loss on ecosystem function requires expand 
ow, are more vulnerable and at a higher risk of extinction due to inappropriate antipredator de 
more vulnerable and at a higher risk of extinction due to inappropriate antipredator defenses w 
10640 1 factors influencing river ecosystems is disturbance, particularly that related to flooding. flo 
9982 1 factors influencing river ecosystems is disturbance, particularly that related to flooding. flo 
9980 1 factors influencing river ecosystems is disturbance, particularly that related to flooding. flo 
10208 1 ered. there are uncertainties about the impacts of this wooded area because of uncertainties ab 
14193 4 recent decades. human induced drainage, climate change, fire events and isolation of peatlands  
human induced drainage, climate change, fire events and isolation of peatlands within an agricu 
sed hydrological shifts resulted in the disturbance of natural development of a bog ecosystem.  
r determining the possible responses to climate change, also for modeling water movement dynami 
7172 2 w to reconstruct the main stages of the invasion. located in the basin of aix -en- provence in  
its presence is clearly perceived as an invasion often attributed to a"disruption of nature"  
14812 1 the high rates of population growth and global warming are expected to further exacerbate the t 
14188 2 to the development of prescriptions for disease management, including the development of a risk 
agement, including the development of a risk assessment and preliminary advice to the public wh 
10076 5 ian crisis marks the largest known mass extinction of life. about 50% of families of plants and 
 successions had not achieved their pre-extinction diversities by the end of the mid triassic,  
munities apparently recovered their pre-extinction diversity and complexity. it s important to  
 today: release of gases and acid rain, global warming over hundreds of years, stagnant waters, 
estions: how do timings and patterns of extinction on land match those in the sea can the cw an 
6963 1  target for almond rootstocks to become drought and ecological tolerant. 487 hybrids are observ 
12579 1 nt of policies on soil protection where heavy metals are applied to agricultural land, by evalu 
10348 2 idely accepted is due to the effects of pollution in the atmosphere. it is also well-known that 
ead crop diseases, so their response to climate change could have significant implications for  
10888 3 s and physical protection against shore erosion and storm surges. mangroves also trap carbon fr 
are maintained and that the emission of greenhouse gases is minimised. aims this research has t 
the sources of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are lost from the soil in mangrov 
6983 1 ir floral components, are threatened by human impact. the biodiversity of such habitats is decr 
9826 1 ides excellent proxies of oceanography, climate change, biodiversity and evolutionary processes 
13863 2 ion behaviors of adult females directly impacts the overall ability of these insects to detect  
proactive against future mosquito-borne disease invasions.  
10055 1 s plant traits that reduce the negative impacts of herbivores, such as the ability to regrow fo 
10317 4  seawater is dropping; a process called ocean acidification. the concern is that these changes  
eady altered their calcification due to ocean acidification. all this information is needed to  
how vulnerable marine ecosystems are to ocean acidification, how likely they are able to adapt  
possible size and timescale of risks of ocean acidification to marine ecosystems.  
2174 1 anges taking place in the region due to climate change via determining what harbour seals are e 
11039 1  the uk government s plans for tackling climate change. one of the major causes of increased at 
10035 1  the uk government s plans for tackling climate change. one of the major causes of increased at 
203 2 rch teams from estonia and from abroad. environmental impacts of cultivating hybrid aspen will  
pplying short rotation forestry and its impacts on estonian nature, landscape, land use, rural  
15283 3 rigin of this enigmatic distribution: a fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
ctors that have shaped it through time: fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
inental flora by vicariance and gradual extinction, or dispersal and recent diversification bet 
15284 3 rigin of this enigmatic distribution: a fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
ctors that have shaped it through time: fragmentation of a macrocontinental flora by vicariance 
inental flora by vicariance and gradual extinction, or dispersal and recent diversification bet 
9959 5                                         global warming due to increasing concentrations of gree 
ing due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the earth s atmosphere is a growing 
 for managing the potential threat from climate change, there has been a push by many governmen 
emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in a future framework. known as reducing em 
ducing emissions from deforestation and degradation or redd, this concept proposes to put in pl 
1089 1 of selective regimes related to habitat degradation. again, the comparison with microsatellite  
2015 3  abundance over the past century due to habitat loss and reductions in dispersal via waterways. 
n dispersal via waterways. furthermore, climate change, through higher temperatures in the alps 
how signs of resilience, delaying local extinction for long but finite periods. plastic express 
10884 2                            a widespread drought is affecting much of south-east england. since  
 below 1961-1990 average rainfall. this drought represents a major threat to the continued supp 
11879 1 l environment in england in the face of climate change and other environmental insults. their r 
10771 3                                man-made climate change poses a grave threat to the survival of  
e able to move quickly enough to escape climate change or will be trapped on islands of suitabl 
 of success or failure of species under climate change on other members of the community. final 
10046 1 interface processes which affect global climate change.  
13805 1 y and field experiments where different extinction scenarios are generated. by shifting the foc 
10143 1 s such as plant eating insects and many disease-causing parasites are so specialised, however,  
10410 1 s such as plant eating insects and many disease-causing parasites are so specialised, however,  
11178 6 ndscapes. because of this human-induced habitat loss, many species with poor dispersal ability  
s can shift their ranges in response to climate change whilst others cannot, is crucial for imp 
n will be crucial for understanding the impacts of climate change on the distribution of biodiv 
rucial for understanding the impacts of climate change on the distribution of biodiversity. the 
rch on understanding and predicting the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation 
rstanding and predicting the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation strategies 
11398 6 ndscapes. because of this human-induced habitat loss, many species with poor dispersal ability  
s can shift their ranges in response to climate change whilst others cannot, is crucial for imp 
n will be crucial for understanding the impacts of climate change on the distribution of biodiv 
rucial for understanding the impacts of climate change on the distribution of biodiversity. the 
rch on understanding and predicting the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation 
rstanding and predicting the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. conservation strategies 
14669 4 cal processes in semiarid areas and the vulnerability to drought phenomenon. the analysis will  
semiarid areas and the vulnerability to drought phenomenon. the analysis will be done using rem 
 in detail the most vulnerable areas to drought occurrence and also to develop future scenarios 
op future scenarios of vegetation cover degradation according to the present climate models.  
14148 1 w genetic diversity referring to higher vulnerability in changing environments. the results des 
15232 2 n hardly be considered an adaptation to fire but rather an exaptacion; however, the characteris 
eristics related to germination in post-fire conditions .  
14176 3 s, we would expect to find the roots of invasive plants to be preferentially colonized by gener 
t the roots of successfully established invasive plants should be colonized by non-generalist a 
pect the am fungal community colonizing invasive plants to be different from those associated w 
13923 2 ts, and thereby protects plants against drought and root pathogens. rhizobacteria, which have c 
of wild barley, grown under contrasting drought stress conditions will bring an insight to plan 
9883 1 s, we hypothesise that colonisation and extinction dynamics at scales of a few metres within a  
11023 1 ultimately how phytoplankton may impact climate change. unlike land plants, phytoplankton are o 
11277 1 d release methane and result in further global warming. at the moment scientists are trying to  
11301 1 d release methane and result in further global warming. at the moment scientists are trying to  
11837 1 d release methane and result in further global warming. at the moment scientists are trying to  
11238 2                                         climate change represents a challenge to conservation b 
tion strategies that are relevant under climate change, and then to bring together appropriate  
2181 4 understand, and predict, the effects of climate change on the temporal and spatial scales relev 
e gradients to explore how climate, and climate change, affects the role of seed recruitment ac 
herefore hypothesize that any impact of climate change on this life-history stage is likely to  
 expertise in the ecological effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems . this project 
14772 1 for the conservation of fauna and flora endangered species, studying the temporary ponds system 
14975 1 gged partridge game management on these endangered species. additionally, we will gather blood, 
10534 1 icaceous plants enzymes involved in the degradation of litter will be studied using ppo enzyme  
15491 1  responses of ecological communities to climate change.  
12138 2 t genetic changes took place during the invasion. in order to gain an insight into the nature o 
that parallel investigations of several alien species could identify certain mechanisms and evo 
11157 3 e are times when this constant churn of extinction and evolutionary replacement is interrupted  
e end of the permian, the greatest mass extinction of them all. there are 5 of these big mass e 
ool aridity was a cause of the f/f mass extinction.  
10874 2  are able to infect bumblebees and what impacts they have on their new hosts. experiments will  
dd to our understanding of the level of risk posed by pathogen spillover to the uk s ecological 
11239 2 g, which will influence future rates of sea level rise. one way to approach this question is to 
is question is to examine past rates of sea level rise associated with known periods of ice she 
12636 2 wever, much evidence suggests that soil degradation, associated with the loss of integrity in t 
llow a spatially explicit estimation of degradation costs in different landscapes and regions a 
11740 1 eric methane concentrations. similarly, global warming will likely cause increased precipitatio 
15066 3 iterranean.presence of a.franciscana as invasive species. implications, supported by mec for th 
008. the previous project evidenced the biodiversity loss for autochthonous species of the genu 
re their disparition by the threatening invasion.  
12263 2 echanisms underlying genotype variation drought tolerance and crop water use efficiency - ident 
her tissue based resistance to take-all disease and / or ability to restrict soil inoculum buil 
13707 1 o, more worrying, that it runs a severe risk of inbreeding problems. the wolf is a film that te 
10320 3 lly about the future. to predict future biodiversity loss in partly cleared natural habitat, a  
d and the loss of species through local extinction. this classic theory does not cover more dis 
lex balance exists between immigration, extinction and the evolution of new species. islands ar 
2050 1 hern species is expected as a result of global warming. paradoxically, however, the svalbard po 
9915 2               evidence for high species extinction rates emphasises the need to identify priori 
mple counts of species and threats, but extinction is complex and results from interactions bet 
13858 7 enya and uganda, is threatened by a new disease. our recent results show that it is serious, wi 
ol, but when spread to a lot of farmers disease problems are becoming more evident. scaling up  
ore trees on the farms and an increased risk for spread of tree pests, like this disease, forci 
isk for spread of tree pests, like this disease, forcing farmers to uproot their trees and hamp 
e agroforestry technologies more robust disease management needs to be developed. the increased 
types. to meet the overall objective of disease control, research will be directed to the follo 
ill be directed to the following areas: disease and pathogen distribution, on local and regiona 
10846 1  to monitor natural variability so that impacts on deep-sea bed biodiversity from industrialisa 
2157 3 ia are a main consequence of freshwater eutrophication. despite considerable research efforts,  
mework directive to reduce the level of eutrophication until 2015, which in many lakes will req 
d and used to illuminate the effects of eutrophication, lake restoration and natural environmen 
12432 4 ding framework to tackle the dangers of climate change. the climate change act received royal a 
ckle the dangers of climate change. the climate change act received royal assent on 26 november 
ernment meets its commitments to tackle climate change, and this includes the establishment of  
ion policy in the uk. specifically, the climate change act requires that a national adaptation  
1966 1  which species and communities react to climate change.  
10903 1 and is potentially threatened by global climate change. these are striking examples of many sit 
11801 1 and is potentially threatened by global climate change. these are striking examples of many sit 
10757 1 od, salinity, temperature or sub-lethal pollution exposure, experienced during the larval phase 
11265 1 od, salinity, temperature or sub-lethal pollution exposure, experienced during the larval phase 
13534 1 s a response to changed land use and/or climate change is whether the forest flora is able to c 
11298 1 critical role in determining the global impacts of climatic change because they cover a signifi 
13977 1 ungi with a view to minimising negative impacts. the project will help verify that the long ter 
12769 5 pronounced and this approach has direct impacts on the conservation of the species concerned. f 
ween individuals resulting in increased risk of disease transmission. fertility control would,  
ividuals resulting in increased risk of disease transmission. fertility control would, in princ 
ing and thus be less likely to increase disease transmission. 3. fertility control could reduce 
ntially reduce vertical transmission of disease . 2. proof of concept of a potentially orally a 
15048 1                           environmental risk assessment requires the use of efficient and sensi 
11598 1  atmosphere to cause a net reduction in global warming potential . the motivation is to establi 
10574 2  affecting the chemical composition and pollution in the region. at the same time, the most rec 
neration of climate models suggest that climate change will have dramatic consequences in the r 
11876 2  affecting the chemical composition and pollution in the region. at the same time, the most rec 
neration of climate models suggest that climate change will have dramatic consequences in the r 
6792 1 ent of cattle. polled cattle reduce the risk of injury by horns to animal breeders and prevent  
11852 1 mal additional deforestation or habitat degradation.  
2482 2 tter understand and mitigate effects of global warming, eutrophication and fisheries. contempor 
and mitigate effects of global warming, eutrophication and fisheries. contemporary models a lim 
15168 1 imilar to spanish ones, and most of the invasive species are associated with this cultural scen 
15226 1 n in wild populations and the potential impacts they may have on the genetic and phenotypic com 
13872 1 m of the present study is to assess the risk and to evaluate the consequences of transmission o 
12450 1 ted by anthropogenic changes, including climate change, to the coastal environment. provide ins 
15523 2  the consequences that this type of bio-invasion has had on other islands devoid of large herbi 
so be meant to detect possible signs of climate change. also, we will carry out a comparative s 
13720 1 hey should thus be avoided. interaction risk should increase with increasing size and decreased 
10157 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
10174 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
10426 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
11426 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
11711 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
11712 3  other factors such as soil conditions, fire and disturbances such as grazing and human influen 
nd mass balances - thereby accelerating global warming and tropical drying. significant transit 
l collaborators to examine climate/soil/disturbance associations in key hot spot rainforest/sav 
7287 2 he response of tropical tree species to climate change remains unclear. one approach is to expl 
e propose to evaluate the potential for climate change adaptation of plant lineages building on 
11627 2 eric and groundwater transport, and the impacts of land use and climate change. the project wil 
nsport, and the impacts of land use and climate change. the project will have a major training  
7159 4 ies have shown that the consequences of global warming are already perceptible, particularly in 
development cycles. study the impact of climate change on biodiversity necessarily involves a s 
s. all of the findings of the impact of climate change comes into effect substantial database r 
sitive species and groups of species to climate change and quune more complete analysis of the  
12262 3 t greenhouse gas emissions, and diffuse pollution of waterways have strengthened the need for f 
rch will assist uk farming in combating climate change and the uk in developing the appropriate 
s from the more extreme consequences of climate change and the need for environmentally sustain 
10831 1  response from o3 in the troposphere to climate change. tropospheric o3 is a greenhouse gas tha 
10400 3  a number of costs. one of these is the risk of becoming infected by a parasite or pathogen fro 
th this density-related increase in the risk of becoming infected. this strategy is known as de 
n mediating key aspects of immunity and disease resistance in insects. longer-term, we hope to  
10133 4 ce established, the negative effects of invasive plants on native plants and animals, and the a 
o a better strategy is to identify high risk species and take measures to prevent this from hap 
t will actually turn invasive and cause biodiversity loss. invasive plants are a major threat t 
n invasive and cause biodiversity loss. invasive plants are a major threat to global biodiversi 
7668 1 as had ecological as well as livelihood impacts. while lucrative, it has led to the loss of bio 
13770 6 tify critical processes associated with fragmentation, isolation and habitat quality at a lands 
o spatial issues, temporal processes of habitat fragmentation are poorly understood although th 
e scenarios will be modelled to predict risk of species extinction and to detect extinction deb 
 be modelled to predict risk of species extinction and to detect extinction debt. these models  
isk of species extinction and to detect extinction debt. these models may also enable sustainab 
policy options to minimize and mitigate biodiversity loss resulting from future land use change 
11292 3                                         ocean acidification represents one of the most signific 
l change is likely to have far-reaching impacts on the ecology and chemistry of the oceans. cer 
era and corals are affected directly by ocean acidification because it lowers the critical conc 
11599 9 and the potential for severe ecological impacts. wildfires can cause significant damage to ecos 
e also associated with a range of other environmental impacts such as increased soil erosion. d 
environmental impacts such as increased soil erosion. despite the serious environmental consequ 
ious environmental consequences of such impacts, almost all of the scientific knowledge of the  
 all of the scientific knowledge of the impacts of moorland wildfires comes from a single event 
ut potential feedbacks between climate, fire frequency, fire severity and carbon fluxes from pe 
dbacks between climate, fire frequency, fire severity and carbon fluxes from peatlands. for thi 
l this fundamental knowledge gap on the impacts of wildfires on uk moorlands. we will visit and 
nd the distribution of broad classes of fire severity. in areas of differing severity we will m 
15330 7                                         drought-induced tree mortality is emerging as a global  
o increase in the future as a result of climate change, particularly in water-limited regions s 
derstand the factors that determine the vulnerability of different species to changes in enviro 
echanisms have been proposed to explain drought-induced mortality in trees: hydraulic failure u 
 in trees: hydraulic failure underlying drought-induced tree mortality in relation to the main  
ion to the main strategies to cope with drought that have been identified in plants, an improve 
nsport and the way they are affected by drought, and the development of more realistic models o 
10313 1 ncrease in cardiovascular and metabolic disease in adulthood, sometimes 50 years after they exp 
15526 9 in the iberian peninsula, due to direct impacts on fish and their habitat and to their facilita 
e description and quantification of the impacts of river damming on river ecosystems, focusing  
o these aims, we will analyze reservoir impacts at different scales, from the microhabitat and  
 and separating upstream and downstream impacts. upstream impacts will be assessed through the  
stream and downstream impacts. upstream impacts will be assessed through the establishment of n 
parameters. most of the research on the impacts of different pressures on freshwater fish has u 
ach specifically designed to assess the impacts of reservoirs and that aims to be maintained at 
d at the mid- and long-term. downstream impacts will be studied through the analysis of current 
communities, including the dominance of invasive species and their biotic integrity. the findin 
13744 1  reproductive rates in explaining local extinction.  
15581 5 are facing enormous challenges, such as climate change and transformation to a future beyond fo 
to cope with problems such as increased risk of heat waves and flooding. to address these chall 
sity may also be part of decreasing the ecological footprint. research challenges and questions 
hey interact across scales what are the impacts of climate and other environmental changes vers 
evels of quality of life is questioned. climate change, natural resource shortage and patterns  
10542 1 e winter and spring periods, when flood risk is greatest. no data are currently available to co 
9958 5                                         climate change is predicted to result in warmer, drier  
changes in plant community composition. fire and nitrogen deposition are major drivers of ecosy 
em services. a recent, severe heathland fire at our long term nitrogen manipulation study site  
e of the microbial community to a major fire, with knock on effects on nutrient cycling and nut 
ill provide important insight into post-fire microbial community dynamics in soils of contrasti 
12055 5                         anticipation of climate change effects on the environmental and sanitar 
fects on the environmental and sanitary impacts associated with the expansion of pine processio 
el for the study of the consequences of climate change. its colonies, made up of irritant larva 
ng the mapping of the areas at sanitary risk. a set of complementary methods for an integrated  
y populations, of their competitors and natural enemies, as well as the susceptibility of human 
15133 3 ich resists the chemical and biological degradation. when talking about basidiomicetes, the so  
ructure to the ones produced during the degradation of lignin. among such compounds, it is nece 
they represent new alternatives for the degradation of aggressive compounds for the environment 
14483 2 especially appropriate for the study of endangered species. it enables animal populations to be 
eces in the field without environmental degradation significantly affecting hormone level and t 
10548 6 esrc espa research programme recognises climate change as a key driver of change in ecosystems, 
ll not have the skills and tools to use climate change information in espa research. through a  
ties living in ecosystems vulnerable to climate change. there will be three activities. first,  
heir livelihoods and raise awareness of climate change impacts in these communities using surve 
s and raise awareness of climate change impacts in these communities using surveys, communicati 
e a unique group of climate and climate impacts researchers from world-leading institutions con 
11324 6 esrc espa research programme recognises climate change as a key driver of change in ecosystems, 
ll not have the skills and tools to use climate change information in espa research. through a  
ties living in ecosystems vulnerable to climate change. there will be three activities. first,  
heir livelihoods and raise awareness of climate change impacts in these communities using surve 
s and raise awareness of climate change impacts in these communities using surveys, communicati 
e a unique group of climate and climate impacts researchers from world-leading institutions con 
10878 1                       a bleeding canker disease epidemic is afflicting the circa 470,000 ecolog 
15101 3                                  global climate change represents a major threat to biodiversit 
ategies for conservation in the face of climate change. habitat models, mathematical equations  
e responses of species distributions to climate change.  
13812 1 ut a broad-scale perspective there is a risk of depletion of biodiversity in the future. as man 
11078 2                                         global warming is occurring at an unprecedented rate in 
ost research to date has focused on the impacts at the simpler levels of biological organisatio 
11357 3 c record contains the effects of global climate change, human invasion, and the megafaunal mass 
effects of global climate change, human invasion, and the megafaunal mass-extinction. the curre 
human invasion, and the megafaunal mass-extinction. the current application seeks to use these  
11609 1 n, and evidence of recovery after major extinction events.  
9836 2 mpts to interpret the effects of global climate change hinge on the analysis of ice and sedimen 
uture effects of current trends such as global warming.  
11063 1 ified subject areas for review from its climate change strategy implementation plan. the agency 
10765 1 or understanding the context of current climate change. for example, investigations of the oxyg 
10248 1  floodplain habitats is increasingly at risk from changes in land management and hydrology. our 
10453 1  floodplain habitats is increasingly at risk from changes in land management and hydrology. our 
9989 1  floodplain habitats is increasingly at risk from changes in land management and hydrology. our 
153 2  state of the riparian communities, the human impact and the land use of the riparian communiti 
ridors and the impact of landuse to the fragmentation of species populations will be found.  
10893 1                            the loss and degradation of tropical forest ecosystems and the assoc 
10900 1 ace diminishing access to resources and degradation of es provision. the large commercial inter 
2496 1 ight lead salmon populations into local extinction by positive density-dependent processes coll 
2497 4 osystem services, and the resistance to biological invasions. lakes are ideal systems for testi 
 saturation, ecosystem functioning, and vulnerability to bioinvasions by field sampling of natu 
ngle effects of multiple stressors like eutrophication, climate change, and invading species on 
multiple stressors like eutrophication, climate change, and invading species on the ecosystem s 
2163 2 nerate insights required to predict the impacts of current climate change scenarios on atlantic 
uired to predict the impacts of current climate change scenarios on atlantic salmon populations 
2161 8                                         exotic species represent an increasing global threat re 
g global threat resulting in ecological disturbance and biodiversity loss in natural ecosystems 
resulting in ecological disturbance and biodiversity loss in natural ecosystems. in spite of re 
rol by predator enhancement. ecological impacts of the invasion involve large changes in popula 
 enhancement. ecological impacts of the invasion involve large changes in population dynamics o 
cess and adaptations, acute and chronic invasion impacts, cost-benefit analyses of management i 
adaptations, acute and chronic invasion impacts, cost-benefit analyses of management implicatio 
 of potential alleviation means after a biological invasion in a northern ecosystem.  
2158 1 ation, sampling induced uncertainty and human impact. the aim of this study is to test species  
2198 1 . an overview of the characteristics of introduced species, linked to aquatic habitats in swede 
1106 1 lian coasts due to different effects of climate change will be predicted in six selected areas: 
465 1 as dreadful vectors of human and animal disease agents. these are sand flies for sand flies and 
13487 1 gen deposition will result in increased disease severity triggering vegetation change, while bo 
12293 7 tuation and potentially how serious the disease will be under our conditions. this project sets 
vide tools for efficiently studying the disease and to start laying the ground for sustainable  
gus in the soil will enable us to study risk factors and predict disease levels. moreover, rapi 
le us to study risk factors and predict disease levels. moreover, rapid and cost effective diag 
s. we need to study many aspects of the disease and its behaviour under uk conditions; how wide 
 aims to provide the tools to study the disease and to begin to begin broadening our knowledge  
 of providing sustainable approaches to disease management.  
15574 3 nctional responses to management, their impacts on microbial functional diversity, and their co 
hange, including extreme changes. their impacts on ecosystem services will be modelled using bo 
ing ecosystem services delivery, and of impacts of management change. their feedbacks and perce 
7247 3 ant system as a result of diffuse metal pollution occurring over several decades and appreciate 
ncy for the appearance and resorption ' pollution of the forest ecosystem. it is hoped to relat 
steps in the evolution of anthropogenic pollution. based on analytical data and technical prese 
12583 4 mplications of these future threats and impacts. work will be done using internationally-renown 
te of organic soils and their potential vulnerability to future management of climate change th 
l vulnerability to future management of climate change threats. the causes and types of organic 
s. the causes and types of organic soil degradation will be identified and prioritised for engl 
15118 4          the intergovernmental panel on climate change predicts an increase of global warming a 
 climate change predicts an increase of global warming and changing patterns of rainfall freque 
tors might interact in a perspective of climate change where rising temperature will be combine 
ature and intensifying the frequency of drought episodes will have an additive effect when decr 
15119 4          the intergovernmental panel on climate change predicts an increase of global warming a 
 climate change predicts an increase of global warming and changing patterns of rainfall freque 
tors might interact in a perspective of climate change where rising temperature will be combine 
mittent streams, naturally subjected to drought and flood events, the benthic organisms usually 
10479 3  of an increasing global population and climate change is water availability. however, we are n 
shows some evidence of being adapted to drought conditions in a way that is not seen in the mod 
ey genome most likely to be affected by drought stress in archaeobotanical samples from nubian  
10145 3 rial processes. climate variability and climate change have significant impacts on river basin  
ity and climate change have significant impacts on river basin landscapes, through changes to r 
nge patterns of vegetation. alternating drought and flood are constant features in many river b 
10979 3 rial processes. climate variability and climate change have significant impacts on river basin  
ity and climate change have significant impacts on river basin landscapes, through changes to r 
nge patterns of vegetation. alternating drought and flood are constant features in many river b 
13854 1 ed by incorporating landscape and urban disturbance variables.  
14859 2 echniques will aim at managing invasive weeds such as canadian thistle, one of the most invasiv 
ch as canadian thistle, one of the most invasive species in dryland crops.  
12719 1 xamine the current and potential future disease and nuisance threats to humans and livestock fr 
12155 1 a for paired ponds, assesses ecological impacts of maintenance,*** and makes new assessment of  
11860 1 edict how coccolithophores may react to climate change. due to the inclusion of both calcite an 
13937 1 d in swedish research and monitoring of eutrophication and fisheries, and there is no on-going  
10382 2 anding of the mechanisms underlying the impacts of climatic change on biodiversity is rudimenta 
opment of accurate predictions of these impacts, and appropriate adaptation and mitigation. the 
10658 7 stresses including nutrient enrichment, climate change and invasion of nonindigenous species. t 
nutrient enrichment, climate change and invasion of nonindigenous species. this latter stress i 
ity has enhanced rates of dispersal and climate change is opening new niches at high latitudes. 
multiple stressors and possible species extinction caused by species invasion. the results will 
le species extinction caused by species invasion. the results will also be highly relevant to t 
o be even more stringent in the face of climate change and disruption of food-chains caused by  
and disruption of food-chains caused by invasion of nonindigenous species.  
9901 7 stresses including nutrient enrichment, climate change and invasion of nonindigenous species. t 
nutrient enrichment, climate change and invasion of nonindigenous species. this latter stress i 
ity has enhanced rates of dispersal and climate change is opening new niches at high latitudes. 
multiple stressors and possible species extinction caused by species invasion. the results will 
le species extinction caused by species invasion. the results will also be highly relevant to t 
o be even more stringent in the face of climate change and disruption of food-chains caused by  
and disruption of food-chains caused by invasion of nonindigenous species.  
10122 1 jor role in the global carbon cycle and climate change may have a significant impact on this pr 
2060 3 ing the rate and expanding the scope of disturbance and habitat change, man has undermined the  
e, but with distinct populations at the risk of extinction. investigating the role wolverines h 
ith distinct populations at the risk of extinction. investigating the role wolverines have in e 
11590 1  of offsetting to reduce the ecological impacts of development in the uk is under detailed eval 
12284 1 ive public goods; specifically, diffuse pollution to air and water. mitigating greenhouse gas . 
12170 1 at set-aside loss will have detrimental impacts on bird populations at the local and the nation 
190 4 t indicator for tracking the effects of eutrophication/pollution, changes in chemical compositi 
 tracking the effects of eutrophication/pollution, changes in chemical composition of the sea w 
ture and dynamics is the human-mediated invasion of alien species. zooplankton plays an essenti 
amics is the human-mediated invasion of alien species. zooplankton plays an essential role in p